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  • 1.
    Alvarez López, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Português vernáculo brasileiro e a hipótese da semi-crioulização2003In: Revista da ABRALIN Associação Brasileira de Lingüística, ISSN 1678-1805, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 111-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the possible semi-creole status of Brazilian Vernacular Portuguese and questions some of the literature on semi-creoles in general. It presents some differences between Brazilian Vernacular Portuguese and creole languages and makes a revision of the semi-creoles. Finally, it proposes new delimitations for the semi-creole concept.

  • 2.
    Bakker, Peter
    et al.
    Research Centre for Grammar and Language Use, Aarhus University .
    Daval-Markussen, Aymeric
    Research Centre for Grammar and Language Use, Aarhus University.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Plag, Ingo
    Universität Siegen.
    Creoles are typologically distinct from non-creoles2011In: Journal of Pidgin and Creole languages ( Print), ISSN 0920-9034, E-ISSN 1569-9870, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 5-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In creolist circles, there has been a long-standing debate whether creoles differ structurally from non-creole languages and thus would form a special class of languages with specific typological properties. This debate about the typological status of creole languages has severely suffered from a lack of systematic empirical study. This paper presents for the first time a number of large-scale empirical investigations of the status of creole languages as a typological class on the basis of different and well-balanced samples of creole and non-creole languages. Using statistical modeling (multiple regression) and recently developed computational tools of quantitative typology (phylogenetic trees and networks), this paper provides robust evidence that creoles indeed form a structurally distinguishable subgroup within the world's languages. The findings thus seriously challenge approaches that hold that creole languages are structurally indistinguishable from non-creole languages.

  • 3. Bakker, Peter
    et al.
    Daval-Markussen, Aymeric
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Plag, Ingo
    Creoles are typologically distinct from non-creoles2013In: Creole languages and linguistic typology / [ed] Parth Bhatt, Tonjes Veenstra, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2013, p. 9-45Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4. Berggren, Max
    et al.
    Karlgren, Jussi
    Östling, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Inferring the location of authors from words in their texts2015In: Proceedings of the 20th Nordic Conference of Computational Linguistics: NODALIDA 2015 / [ed] Beáta Megyesi, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, ACL Anthology , 2015, p. 211-218Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the purposes of computational dialectology or other geographically bound text analysis tasks, texts must be annotated with their or their authors' location. Many texts are locatable but most have no ex- plicit annotation of place. This paper describes a series of experiments to determine how positionally annotated microblog posts can be used to learn location indicating words which then can be used to locate blog texts and their authors. A Gaussian distribution is used to model the locational qualities of words. We introduce the notion of placeness to describe how locational words are.

    We find that modelling word distributions to account for several locations and thus several Gaussian distributions per word, defining a filter which picks out words with high placeness based on their local distributional context, and aggregating locational information in a centroid for each text gives the most useful results. The results are applied to data in the Swedish language.

  • 5. Borin, Lars
    et al.
    Brandt, Martha D.
    Edlund, Jens
    Lindh, Jonas
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Svenska språket i den digitala tidsåldern2012Book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Dahl, Östen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Divan får se upp - nu kommer divalaterna!2010In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no aprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Engstrand, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Helgasson, Petur
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The beginnings of a database for historical sound change2008In: Papers from the 21st Swedish Phonetics Conference, 2008, p. 101-104Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We report a preliminary version of a database from which examples of historical sound change can be retrieved and analyzed. To date, the database contains about 1,000 examples of regular sound changes from a variety of language families. As exemplified in the text, searches can be made based on IPA symbols, articulatory features, segmental or prosodic context, or type of change. The database is meant to provide an adequately large sample of areally and genetically balanced information on historical sound changes that tend to take place in the world’s languages. It is also meant as a research tool in the quest for diachronic explanations of genetic and areal biases in synchronic typology.

  • 8.
    Jansson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Strimling, Pontus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Modeling the Evolution of Creoles2015In: Language Dynamics and Change, ISSN 2210-5824, E-ISSN 2210-5832, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Various theories have been proposed regarding the origin of creole languages. Describing a process where only the end result is documented involves several methodological difficulties. In this paper we try to address some of the issues by using a novel mathematical model together with detailed empirical data on the origin and structure of Mauritian Creole. Our main focus is on whether Mauritian Creole may have originated only from a mutual desire to communicate, without a target language or prestige bias. Our conclusions are affirmative. With a confirmation bias towards learning from successful communication, the model predicts Mauritian Creole better than any of the input languages, including the lexifier French, thus providing a compelling and specific hypothetical model of how creoles emerge. The results also show that it may be possible for a creole to develop quickly after first contact, and that it was created mostly from material found in the input languages, but without inheriting their morphology.

  • 9. Jansson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Strimling, Pontus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Modelling the evolution of creoles2012In: The Evolution of Language: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference (EVOLANG9) / [ed] Thomas C. Scott-Phillips et al., Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Company , 2012, p. 464-465Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Jon-And, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Developing a pidgin corpus2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Jon-And, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Funcke, Alexander
    Is Language Less Cumulative than Other Culture? Indicators of Breakdown and Build-up of Complexityin Pidgins, Creoles and Non-contact Languages2018In: Applications in Cultural Evolution: Arts, Languages, Technologies: Conference abstracts, 2018, p. 18-19Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the study of cultural evolution, human culture is generally assumed to be cumulative, implying increasing complexity and diversity over time (Enquist et al. 2011, Lewis & Laland 2012). Recent studies suggest that evolutionary mechanisms operate differently in different cultural domains (Tamariz et al. 2016), but it has not been discussed whether all mechanisms result in cumulativity. Experiments have shown that compositional language structure emerge as a trade-off between learnability and expressivity (Kirby et al. 2008, 2015), but there is no evidence of languages generally becoming more compositional, or regular, over time. As all modern natural languages are expressive enough for human communicative needs and compressed enough for generational transmission, we suggest that linguistic complexity is 19 not currently cumulative but breaks down and builds up in cycles triggered by demographically determined variation in learnability and expressivity pressures. We focus on pidgins, a special case of natural languages where the expressivity pressure is presumably weaker and learnability pressure stronger than in other languages. We compare pidgins to creoles, where both expressivity and learnability pressures are presumably high, and non-contact languages where the learnability pressure is presumably lower, allowing for more complexity. We analyze compiled material from spoken and written pidgins, spoken creoles and non-contact languages and a parallel bible corpus, applying two complexity measures: the relation between word length and frequency, and pronominal morphology. We observe a smaller degree of exponentiality in the negative correlation between word length and frequency in pidgins than in their lexifiers, likely reflecting the loss of short and common grammatical words. Creoles expose a higher exponentiality in this correlation, which may reflect a newly built up analytical grammar. For pronouns, we observe expected reduced marking of person, number, case and gender in pidgins, increasing in creoles, being highest in non-contact languages.

  • 12.
    Jon-And, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Funcke, Alexander
    Word Length and word frequency in pidgins and creoles2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Den flerspråkiga världen i siffror2003In: Låt mig ha kvar mitt språk: den tredje SUKKA-rapporten = Antakaa minun pitää kieleni: kolmas SUKKA-raportti / [ed] Raija Kangassalo, Ingmarie Mellenius, Umeå: Inst. för moderna språk, Umeå univérsitet , 2003, 11, p. 13-32Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14. Klein, Raymond M.
    et al.
    Christie, John
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Does multilingualism affect the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease?: A worldwide analysis by country2016In: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 2, p. 463-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been suggested that the cognitive requirements associated with bi- and multilingual processing provide a form of mental exercise that, through increases in cognitive reserve and brain fitness, may delay the symptoms of cognitive failure associated with Alzheimer′s disease and other forms of dementia. We collected data on a country-by-country basis that might shed light on this suggestion. Using the best available evidence we could find, the somewhat mixed results we obtained provide tentative support for the protective benefits of multilingualism against cognitive decline. But more importantly, this study exposes a critical issue, which is the need for more comprehensive and more appropriate data on the subject.

  • 15. McWhorter, John
    et al.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Pas tout à fait du français: Une étude créole2002In: Études créoles, ISSN 0708-2398, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 179-231Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. Melin, Lars
    et al.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Laddade ord: en bok om tankens makt över språket2016Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    A note on the peopling of English St. Kitts1999In: St. Kitts and the Atlantic Creoles: The texts of Samuel Augustus Mathews in perspective / [ed] Philip Baker, Adrienne Bruyn, London: Westminster University Press , 1999Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Access, prestige and losses in contact languages2013In: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, ISSN 1366-7289, E-ISSN 1469-1841, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 746-747Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Agency in the Emergence of Creole Languages ed. by Nicholas Faraclas2014In: Journal of Historical Linguistics, ISSN 2210-2116, E-ISSN 2210-2124, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 293-300Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Arabiska Sveriges näst största modersmål2018In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Avslöjar vårt språk att vi aldrig var smutsiga förr?2018In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Bettina Migge (2003): Creole Formation as Language Contact. The case of the Suriname Creoles2005In: Studies in Language, ISSN 0378-4177, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 700-706Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Brief Note on Valdman (2005)2006In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, ISSN 0272-2631, E-ISSN 1470-1545, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 515-516Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Creolistics and the quest for creoleness: A reply to Claire Lefebvre2000In: Journal of Pidgin and Creole languages ( Print), ISSN 0920-9034, E-ISSN 1569-9870, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 147-151Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Cutting off the branch2002In: Pidgin and Creole Linguistics in the Twenty-First Century / [ed] Gilbert, Glenn, New York: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2002, p. 355-367Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Da África Para o Atlântico2012Book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Den svenska normalmeningen2006In: Språkvård, ISSN 0038-8440, no 3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Du duger bra2007In: Språkvård, no 1, p. 49-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Feature selection and genetic relationships among the Atlantic creoles1999In: Spreading the Word: Papers on the issue of diffusion of Atlantic Creoles / [ed] Magnus Huber, Mikael Parkvall, London: Westminster University Press , 1999, p. 29-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    (flera olika artiklar i denna bok)2007In: Fråga experten, Nationalencyklopedin, Malmö , 2007Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    (flera olika artiklar i detta verk)2007In: Nationalencyklopedien, 2007Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    (flera uppslag)2007In: Fråga experten / [ed] Lundquist, Sophia, Malmö: Nationalencyklopedin, 2007Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Gör den stora språkdöden världen fattigare eller rikare?2017In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Handel och krig gynnar pidginisering2016In: Språkbruk, ISSN 0358-9293, no 3, p. 26-30Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    ”Hen”-kulturer är inte mer jämställda2012In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 2001-3868, no 16 marsArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    How European is Esperanto?: A typological study2010In: Language Problems and Language Planning, ISSN 0272-2690, E-ISSN 1569-9889, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 63-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The typological similarities between Esperanto and other languages have long been a matter of debate. Assuming that foreign-language structures are more easily acquired when they resemble those of the learner's native tongue, any candidate for a global lingua franca obviously ought to be as typologically neutral as possible. One common criticism of Esperanto is that it is 'too European,' and thus less accessible to speakers of non-European languages. In order to provide a more solid base for such discussions, this paper makes an attempt to quantify the Eurocentricity of Esperanto, employing the features catalogued in the World Atlas of Language Structures. It is concluded that Esperanto is indeed somewhat European in character, but considerably less so than the European languages themselves.

  • 37.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Här går gränsen!2012In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no oktoberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Här var det mångfald!2016In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 3, p. 56-63Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    I rymden talas fler språk än man kan tro2015In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 27 december, p. 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Jos Suomi kuuluisi vielä Ruotsiin...2009In: Kieliviesti, ISSN 0280-350X, no 4, p. 13-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Kan ord få oss att gilla terrorister?2017In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Kulturelle veikryss. Essays om kreolisering. By Thomas Hylland Eriksen1997In: Journal of Pidgin and Creole languages ( Print), ISSN 0920-9034, E-ISSN 1569-9870, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 356-358Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Känslosvall som bara en ny ordbok kan skapa2015In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 17 aprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Lagom finns bara i Sverige: och andra myter om språk2009 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Language Contact in the Arctic. Northern Pidgins and Contact Languages2000In: Journal of Pidgin and Creole languages ( Print), ISSN 0920-9034, E-ISSN 1569-9870, Vol. 15, no 1Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Limits of Language: almost everything you didn't know you didn't know about language and languages2006Book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Nordisk och finländsk språkpolitik i ett globalt perspektiv2017In: Språk i Norden, E-ISSN 2246-1701, p. 82-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an attempt to on the one hand offer a brief survey of national langauges policies of the world, and on the other hand to situate those of the Nordic countries in general, and Finland in particular, in this global context. The impressive (albeit not always sucessful) measures of Finnish authori-ties to uphold bilingualism are highlighted, and argued to have few parallels world-wide.

  • 48.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    När språkpoliser larmade om tjej och käka2018In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    När två (eller flera) språk blir ett2017In: Språktidningen, ISSN 1654-5028, no 4, p. 51-61Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Parkvall, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    On the possibility of Afrogenesis in the case of French Creoles1999In: Creole genesis, attitudes and discourse, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 1999, p. 187-213Chapter in book (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 98
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