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  • 1.
    Altizer, Sonia
    et al.
    Institute of Ecology, University of Georgia.
    Nunn, Charles L
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Do threatened hosts have fewer parasites?: A comparative study in primates2007In: Journal of Ecology, ISSN 0022-0477, E-ISSN 1365-2745, Vol. 76, p. 304-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Parasites and infectious diseases have become a major concern in conservation biology, in part because they can trigger or accelerate species or population declines. Focusing on primates as a well-studied host clade, we tested whether the species richness and prevalence of parasites differed between threatened and non-threatened host species.

    2. We collated data on 386 species of parasites (including viruses, bacteria, protozoa, helminths and arthropods) reported to infect wild populations of 36 threatened and 81 non-threatened primate species. Analyses controlled for uneven sampling effort and host phylogeny.

    3. Results showed that total parasite species richness was lower among threatened primates, supporting the prediction that small, isolated host populations harbour fewer parasite species. This trend was consistent across three major parasite groups found in primates (helminths, protozoa and viruses). Counter to our predictions, patterns of parasite species richness were independent of parasite transmission mode and the degree of host specificity.

    4. We also examined the prevalence of selected parasite genera among primate sister-taxa that differed in their ranked threat categories, but found no significant differences in prevalence between threatened and non-threatened hosts.

    5. This study is the first to demonstrate differences in parasite richness relative to host threat status. Results indicate that human activities and host characteristics that increase the extinction risk of wild animal species may lead simultaneously to the loss of parasites. Lower average parasite richness in threatened host taxa also points to the need for a better understanding of the cascading effects of host biodiversity loss for affiliated parasite species.

  • 2.
    Bergström, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Ljungros, Kristina
    Forsberg Nilsson, Karin
    Ericson, Emilia
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Larhammar, Dan
    Nu hotas kvinnors rätt till sina kroppar2014In: Aftonbladet, ISSN 0349-1145Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3. Daruvala, Dinky
    et al.
    Dannefjord, Per
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Sturmark, Christer
    Slopa statligt stöd till homofoba trossamfund2015In: Aftonbladet, ISSN 1103-9000Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4. Edman, Per
    et al.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    Martinsson, Anders
    Svensson, Erik
    Westerstrand, Magnus
    Kolkraften en svart fläck på Sveriges klimatsamvete2009In: NewsmillArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5. Ericson, Emilia
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Ulf
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Sturmark, Crister
    Humanisterna tar barns religionsfrihet på allvar2015In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 28 aprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Human size evolution: no allometric relationship between male and female stature2004In: Journal of Human Evolution, ISSN 0047-2484, E-ISSN 1095-8606, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 253-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many animal groups, sexual size dimorphism tends to be more pronounced in species with large body size. Similarly, in a previous cross-cultural analysis, male and female stature in humans were shown to be positively allometrically related, indicating a similar relationship where populations with larger stature were more dimorphic. In this study, we re-examine the hypothesis of an allometric relationship between the sexes using phylogenetic methodology. First, however, we tested whether there exist phylogenetic signals in male and female stature. Data on mean stature from 124 human populations was gathered from the literature. A phylogenetic test showed that male and female stature were significantly associated with phylogeny. These results indicate that comparative methods that to some degree incorporate genetic relatedness between populations are crucial when analyzing human size evolution in a cross-cultural context. Further, neither non-phylogenetic nor phylogenetic analyses revealed any allometric relationship between male and female stature. Thus, we found no support for the idea that sexual dimorphism increases with increasing stature in humans

  • 7.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Latitudinal patterns in human stature and sexual stature dimorphism2009In: Annals of Human Biology, ISSN 0301-4460, E-ISSN 1464-5033, Vol. 36, p. 74-87Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Gustafsson, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Zoologisk ekologi.
    Werdelin, Lars
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet.
    Tullberg, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Zoologisk ekologi.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Zoologisk ekologi. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Stature and sexual stature dimorphism in Sweden, from the 10th to the end of the 20th century2007In: American Journal of Human Biology, ISSN 1042-0533, E-ISSN 1520-6300, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 861-870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mean stature in a population has been observed to vary with living conditions. If, and how, this affects sexual dimorphism in stature is not fully understood. We analyzed stature data from Swedish populations from the 10th to the end of the 20th century to investigate if male stature is more plastic than female stature in response to environmental changes. Further, we examined if there, as a consequence of this, exists an allometric relationship between male and female stature that is not caused by genetic factors, coupling greater stature with greater dimorphism. We found no significant change in stature from the 10th century to the 17th century, but a clear increase in both male and female stature during the 20th century, most likely because of improved living conditions. Regression analyses revealed no consistent change in sexual stature dimorphism over time for any of the time periods, including the 20th century. Further, we found no significant allometric relationship between male and female stature, and could consequently not identify any significant relationship between stature and stature dimorphism. Thus, contrary to previous suggestions, the regressions did not provide support for the assertion that male stature is more sensitive to environmental changes than female stature, nor that stature dimorphism increases with increasing stature. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 19:861–870, 2007.

  • 9.
    Isaksson, Sven
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Funcke, Alexander
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. University of Pennsylvania, USA.
    Envall, Ida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    A Novel Method to Analyze Social Transmission in Chronologically Sequenced Assemblages, Implemented on Cultural Inheritance of the Art of Cooking2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e0122092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we present an analytical technique for the measurement and evaluation of changes in chronologically sequenced assemblages. To illustrate the method, we studied the cultural evolution of European cooking as revealed in seven cook books dispersed over the past 800 years. We investigated if changes in the set of commonly used ingredients were mainly gradual or subject to fashion fluctuations. Applying our method to the data from the cook books revealed that overall, there is a clear continuity in cooking over the ages - cooking is knowledge that is passed down through generations, not something (re-) invented by each generation on its own. Looking at three main categories of ingredients separately (spices, animal products and vegetables), however, disclosed that all ingredients do not change according to the same pattern. While choice of animal products was very conservative, changing completely sequentially, changes in the choices of spices, but also of vegetables, were more unbounded. We hypothesize that this may be due a combination of fashion fluctuations and changes in availability due to contact with the Americas during our study time period. The presented method is also usable on other assemblage type data, and can thus be of utility for analyzing sequential archaeological data from the same area or other similarly organized material.

  • 10.
    Jansson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Institute for Future Studies.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Sandberg, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Halmstad University .
    Democratic revolutions as institutional innovation diffusion: rapid adoption and survival of democracy2013In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 80, no 8, p. 1546-1556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent ‘democratic revolutions’ in Islamic countries call for a re-consideration of transitions to and from democracy. Transitions to democracy have often been considered the outcome of socio-economic modernization and therefore slow and incremental processes. But as a recent study has made clear, in the last century, transitions to democracy have mainly occurred through rapid leaps rather than slow and incremental steps. Here, we therefore apply an innovation and systems perspective and consider transitions to democracy as processes of institutional, and therefore systemic, innovation adoption. We show that transitions to democracy starting before 1900 lasted for an average of 50 years and a median of 56 years, while transitions originating later took an average of 4.6 years and a median of 1.7 years. However, our results indicate that the survival time of democratic regimes is longer in cases where the transition periods have also been longer, suggesting that patience paid in previous democratizations. We identify a critical ‘consolidation-preparing’ transition period of 12 years. Our results also show that in cases where the transitions have not been made directly from autocracy to democracy, there are no main institutional paths towards democracy. Instead, democracy seems reachable from a variety of directions. This is in line with the analogy of diffusion of innovations at the nation systems level, for which assumptions are that potential adopter systems may vary in susceptibility over time. The adoption of the institutions of democracy therefore corresponds to the adoption of a new political communications standard for a nation, in this case the innovation of involving in principle all adult citizens on an equal basis.

  • 11.
    Kodandaramaiah, Ullasa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Indian Institute of Science Education & Research (IISER), India.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Tullberg, Birgitta S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Deflective and intimidating eyespots: a comparative study of eyespot size and position in Junonia butterflies2013In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 3, no 13, p. 4518-4524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eyespots are conspicuous circular features found on the wings of several lepidopteran insects. Two prominent hypotheses have been put forth explaining their function in an antipredatory role. The deflection hypothesis posits that eyespots enhance survival in direct physical encounters with predators by deflecting attacks away from vital parts of the body, whereas the intimidation hypothesis posits that eyespots are advantageous by scaring away a potential predator before an attack. In the light of these two hypotheses, we investigated the evolution of eyespot size and its interaction with position and number within a phylogenetic context in a group of butterflies belonging to the genus Junonia. We found that larger eyespots tend to be found individually, rather than in serial dispositions. Larger size and conspicuousness make intimidating eyespots more effective, and thus, we suggest that our results support an intimidation function in some species of Junonia with solitary eyespots. Our results also show that smaller eyespots in Junonia are located closer to the wing margin, thus supporting predictions of the deflection hypothesis. The interplay between size, position, and arrangement of eyespots in relation to antipredation and possibly sexual selection, promises to be an interesting field of research in the future. Similarly, further comparative work on the evolution of absolute eyespot size in natural populations of other butterfly groups is needed.

  • 12.
    Kvarnemo, Charlotta
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Ah-King, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    Ahnesjö, Ingrid
    Uppsala universitet.
    Workshop review of: Gender perspectives on the development of sexual selection theory, Uppsala, October 20082009In: ISBE Newsletter, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 11-13Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Lind, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    The Number of Cultural Traits Is Correlated with Female Group Size but Not with Male Group Size in Chimpanzee Communities2010In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 5, no 3, p. e9241-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What determines the number of cultural traits present in chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) communities is poorly understood. In humans, theoretical models suggest that the frequency of cultural traits can be predicted by population size. In chimpanzees, however, females seem to have a particularly important role as cultural carriers. Female chimpanzees use tools more frequently than males. They also spend more time with their young, skewing the infants’ potential for social learning towards their mothers. In Gombe, termite fishing has been shown to be transmitted from mother to offspring. Lastly, it is female chimpanzees that transfer between communities and thus have the possibility of bringing in novel cultural traits from other communities. From these observations we predicted that females are more important cultural carriers than males. Here we show that the reported number of cultural traits in chimpanzee communities correlates with the number of females in chimpanzee communities, but not with the number of males. Hence, our results suggest that females are the carriers of chimpanzee culture.

  • 14.
    Lind, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Brooklyn College, USA.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Dating human cultural capacity using phylogenetic principles2013In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 3, article id 1785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Humans have genetically based unique abilities making complex culture possible; an assemblage of traits which we term cultural capacity. The age of this capacity has for long been subject to controversy. We apply phylogenetic principles to date this capacity, integrating evidence from archaeology, genetics, paleoanthropology, and linguistics. We show that cultural capacity is older than the first split in the modern human lineage, and at least 170,000 years old, based on data on hyoid bone morphology, FOXP2 alleles, agreement between genetic and language trees, fire use, burials, and the early appearance of tools comparable to those of modern hunter-gatherers. We cannot exclude that Neanderthals had cultural capacity some 500,000 years ago. A capacity for complex culture, therefore, must have existed before complex culture itself. It may even originated long before. This seeming paradox is resolved by theoretical models suggesting that cultural evolution is exceedingly slow in its initial stages.

  • 15.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Att fostra fritänkare2015In: Sans, ISSN 2000-9690, no 1, p. 7p. 34-40Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Be inga böner för Paris2015In: Humanisten, ISSN 2002-1437, Vol. 4, p. 8-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Bibeln är kvinnofientlig2007In: Aftonbladet debatt: Aftonbladet 4 maj, Vol. 7 majArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Biståndspengar ska inte bekosta missionerande2012In: Aftonbladet, ISSN 0349-1145Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Bland häxor och missionärer i Kenya2007In: Humanisten, Vol. 3, p. 37-38Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution. Ekologi.
    Bön från en otrogen2008In: NewsmillArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    Claphaminstitutet skriver sin egen historia2009In: Världen Idag, no 12 oktoberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Claphaminstitutets lögner om evolutionsteorin2010In: NewsmillArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Da Vinci-koden och bibeln - vilken bok har egentligen trovärdighetsproblem?2006In: Humanisten, no 4, p. 36-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Dagens 16-åringar har vad som krävs för att få rösta2013In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 29 juliArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Darwins teorier är bekräftade2009In: Expressen, no 10 mars, p. 4-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    De religiösa texterna är problemet2014In: Svenska dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Det ligger i människans natur att ha kultur2010In: Tvärsnitt, no 2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Det är friheten vi måste försvara2017In: Sans, ISSN 2000-9690, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Därför behöver vi häda2015In: Dala-Demokraten, ISSN 1103-9183, no 12 februari, p. 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 30.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Därför är vetenskap och religion oförenliga2012In: NewsmillArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 31.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Eid al-Fitr åt alla!2010In: NewsmillArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    En ateist blir till2009In: NewsmillArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    En kyrka för alla?2009In: Aftonbladet, no 21 majArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Era argument ekar av USA:s kristna höger2017In: Aftonbladet, ISSN 1103-9000Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Ett skyddshelgon för homosexuella?2010In: NewsmillArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Evolutionsteorin mer bekräftad än någonsin2009In: NewsmillArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 37.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Evolutionära förklaringar av religion2016In: Varför finns religion? / [ed] David Thurfjell, Stockholm: Molin & Sorgenfrei, 2016, p. 2-22Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    For Whose Benefit? The Biological and Cultural Evolution of Human Cooperation2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book takes the reader on a journey, navigating the enigmatic aspects of cooperation; a journey that starts inside the body and continues via our thoughts to the human super-organism.

    Cooperation is one of life’s fundamental principles. We are all made of parts – genes, cells, organs, neurons, but also of ideas, or ‘memes’. Our societies too are made of parts – us humans. Is all this cooperation fundamentally the same process?

    From the smallest component parts of our bodies and minds to our complicated societies, everywhere cooperation is the organizing principle. Often this cooperation has emerged because the constituting parts have benefited from the interactions, but not seldom the cooperating units appear to lose on the interaction. How then to explain cooperation? How can we understand our intricate societies where we regularly provide small and large favors for people we are unrelated to, know, or even never expect to meet again? Where does the idea come from that it is right to risk one’s life for country, religion or freedom? The answers seem to reside in the two processes that have shaped humanity: biological and cultural evolution.

  • 39.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Frälsningsarmén värvar medlemmar bland samhällets mest utsatta2011In: SVT DebattArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Gardell önskar sig en egen Gud2009In: Humanisten : tidskrift för kultur- och livsåskådningsdebatt, ISSN 1401-8691, no 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Glaciärerna smälter fortfarande2010In: NewsmillArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Humanism utgår ifrån människan2013In: Dagen, ISSN 1652-5264, no 25 juliArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Ingen vet Jesus födelsedag2011In: Expressen, no 30/11, p. 4-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Jan Björklund ger dubbla budskap om religiösa friskolor2009In: NewsmillArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Jan Björklunds egna bristande kunskaper visar på faran med en partisk skola2010In: NewsmillArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Jonas Svensson, Människans Muhammed2015In: Chaos: skandinavisk tidsskrift for religionshistoriske studier, ISSN 0108-4453, E-ISSN 1901-9106, Vol. 2, no 64Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    Julen är en högtid för alla2008In: NewsmillArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 48.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Jultomten är mer kärleksfull än Gud2012In: NewsmillArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Cultural Evolution.
    Jultomten är mycket så mer än bara ett kristet helgon2012In: NewsmillArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Katolska kyrkan behöver fortfarande reformeras2016In: Dagens samhälle, ISSN 1652-6511, no 30 oktoberArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
123 1 - 50 of 136
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