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  • 1.
    Edlund, Jens
    et al.
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Alexandersson, Simon
    Beskow, Jonas
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Heldner, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Hjalmarsson, Anna
    KTH Speech, Music and Hearing.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ellen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    3rd party observer gaze as a continuous measure of dialogue flow2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an attempt at using 3rd party observer gaze to get a measure of how appropriate each segment in a dialogue is for a speaker change. The method is a step away from the current dependency of speaker turns or talkspurts towards a more general view of speaker changes. We show that 3rd party observers do indeed largely look at the same thing (the speaker), and how this can be captured and utilized to provide insights into human communication. In addition, the results also suggest that there might be differences in the distribution of 3rd party observer gaze depending on how information-rich an utterance is. 

  • 2.
    Edström, Isabelle
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Markelius, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Strandberg, Andrea
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Strömberg, Nina
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Svensson, Katarina
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Does production facilitate discrimination?: An infant mismatch negativity study2013In: Proceedings of Fonetik 2013: Studies in Language and Culture no. 21 / [ed] Robert Eklund, Linköping, 2013, p. 17-20Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MMN is an ERP component that reflects preattentive discrimination between a recurring standard sound and a deviating sound. MMN is frequently used in infant studies focused on speech development since its elicitation does not require the attention of the child. The general ability of infants to discriminate speech sounds is gradually specialized towards discrimination of phonetic contrasts in their mother tongue. The aim of the present study was to examine if an MMN response is elicited by naturally varying speech stimuli (/ ti/ and / ki/) and if this response is stronger for the speech sound that infants typically produce at this age (/ t/). An EEG experiment with an oddball paradigm was designed. Participants were 19 infants (9-mo). An MMN-like negative response to deviants compared to standards was found, however it was not statistically significant. No significant interaction effect was found for MMN and type of deviant stimulus. Variation in the standard stimuli may have contributed to the lack of effect. It is also possible that the infants already were equally competent in discriminating both speech sounds, which may account for the small difference between the deviant waveforms.

  • 3.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Klintfors, Eeva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lindh, Jonas
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Neural processing of voices - familiarity2013In: Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics: POMA - ICA 2013 Montreal, Acoustical Society of America (ASA), 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Brain responses to familiar and unfamiliar voices were investigated with ERPs (Event Related Potentials). Presentation of a stream of one syllable utterances from a female voice established a standard expectation, and similar samples from four other male voices where inserted as unexpected deviants in a typical mismatch paradigm. The participants were 12 students from the basic course in linguistics. Two of the deviant voices were familiar voices of their teachers. The two other deviant voices were matched (same age, sex and dialect) but unfamiliar to the participants. A typical MMN (Mismatch Negativity) was elicited, i.e. a more negative response to the deviants compared to the standards. In contrast to verbal reports, where only one participant identified any of the deviant voices, the MMN response differed on group level between familiar and unfamiliar voices. MMN to familiar voices was larger. Using teachers' voices ensured naturalistic long term exposure, but did not allow for random assignment to conditions of familiarity making the design quasi-experimental. Thus acoustic analysis of voice characteristics as well as follow up studies with randomized exposure to voices are needed to rule out possible confounds and establish a causal effect of voice familiarity.

  • 4.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lindh, Jonas
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Markelius, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Ericsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Moniri, Sadegheh Farah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Klintfors, Eeva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Neural processing of familiar and unfamiliar voices2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a pilot study on neural processing of familiar and unfamiliar voices in adults. This is the first of a series of experiments we plan to perform to examine how general biological mechanisms and linguistic experience might interact during voice recognition, from birth up until adulthood. We have chosen to measure ERPs1 during voice presentation because it allows for an experimental setup suitable for both adults and infants (in future studies). Furthermore it captures the subject’s reaction to stimuli in both the sensory pathways and cognitive processing. In the current study our intention was to examine adults’ responses to familiar and unfamiliar voices as well as to evaluate the experimental design for our future studies.

  • 5.
    Hörberg, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    The neurophysiological correlate to grammatical function reanalysis in Swedish2013In: Language and cognitive processes (Print), ISSN 0169-0965, E-ISSN 1464-0732, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 388-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Language comprehension is assumed to proceed incrementally, and comprehenders commit to initial interpretations even in the absence of unambiguous information. Initial ambiguous object arguments are therefore preferably interpreted as subjects, an interpretation that needs to be revised towards an object initial interpretation once the disambiguating information is encountered. Most accounts of such grammatical function reanalyses assume that they involve phrase structure revisions, and do not differ from other syntactic reanalyses. A number of studies using measurements of event-related brain potentials (ERPs) provide evidence for this view by showing that both reanalysis types engender similar neurophysiological responses (e.g., P600 effects). Others have claimed that grammatical function reanalyses rather involve revisions of the mapping of thematic roles to argument noun phrases (NPs). In line with this, it has been shown that grammatical function reanalysis during spoken language comprehension engenders a N400 effect, an effect which has been shown to correlate with general problems in the mapping of thematic roles to argument NPs in a number of languages. This study investigated the ERP correlate to grammatical function reanalysis in Swedish. Postverbal NPs that disambiguated the interpretation of object-topicalised sentences towards an object-initial reading engendered a N400 effect with a local, right-parietal distribution. This ‘‘reanalysis N400’’ effect provides further support for the view that grammatical function reanalysis is functionally distinct from syntactic reanalyses and rather involves a revision of the mapping of thematic roles to the sentence arguments. Postverbal subject pronouns in object-topicalised sentences were also found to engender an enhanced P300 wave in comparison to object pronouns, an effect which seems to depend on the overall infrequency of object-topicalised constructions. This finding provides support for the view that the ‘‘reanalysis N400’’ in some cases can be attenuated by a task-related P300 component.

  • 6.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics. Lund University, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Ors, Marianne
    Sahlén, Birgitta S.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Engström, Elisabet
    Uhlén, Inger
    Semantic Processing in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children: Large N400 Mismatch Effects in Brain Responses, Despite Poor Semantic Ability2016In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 7, article id 1146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Difficulties in auditory and phonological processing affect semantic processing in speech comprehension for deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children. However, little is known about brain responses related to semantic processing in this group. We investigated event-related potentials (ERPs) in DHH children with cochlear implants (CIs) and/or hearing aids (HAs), and in normally hearing controls (NH). We used a semantic priming task with spoken word primes followed by picture targets. In both DHH children and controls, cortical response differences between matching and mismatching targets revealed a typical N400 effect associated with semantic processing. Children with CI had the largest mismatch response despite poor semantic abilities overall; Children with CI also had the largest ERP differentiation between mismatch types, with small effects in within-category mismatch trials (target from same category as prime) and large effects in between-category mismatch trials (where target is from a different category than prime), compared to matching trials. Children with NH and HA had similar responses to both mismatch types. While the large and differentiated ERP responses in the CI group were unexpected and should be interpreted with caution, the results could reflect less precision in semantic processing among children with CI, or a stronger reliance on predictive processing.

  • 7.
    Klintfors, Eeva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Marklund, Ellen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Cortical N400-potentials generated by adults in response to semantic incongruities2011In: Proceedings of Fonetik 2011: Speech, Music and Hearing TMH-QPSR Vol. 51 / [ed] Björn Granström, David House, Daniel Neiberg, Sofia Strömbergsson, Stockholm, Sweden: Universitetsserveice AB , 2011, p. 121-124Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Eight adult participants were investigated in a pre-experiment for the future assessment of semantic N400 effects in children. The materials were words resented in semantically incongruent vs. congruent picture contexts. For example, he word duck was played while a picture of a tree was shown in the incongruent est condition vs. the word duck was played while a picture of a duck was shown in the congruent test condition. A larger N400 effect was expected in response to the incongruent audio-visual pairings. The results showed in time extended peak-to peak differences between congruent and incongruent audio-visual pairings at the centroparietal, parietal and parieto-occipital recording sites. This study was performed to validate the current materials to be used to answer questions on appearance of the N400 component in children.

  • 8.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Linneaus Centre: Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Linneaus Centre: Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University, Sweden.
    Ors, Marianne
    Linneaus Centre: Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University, Sweden.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Rosenlunds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Phonics Approach in Swedish Children using Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids: Inspecting Phonological Gain2014In: Journal of Communication Disorders, Deaf Studies & Hearing Aids, ISSN 2375-4427, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 117-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lund University.
    Wass, Malin
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Ors, Marianne
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Computer-assisted training of phoneme-grapheme correspondence for children who are deaf and hard of hearing: Effects on phonological processing skills2013In: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, ISSN 0165-5876, E-ISSN 1872-8464, Vol. 77, no 12, p. 2049-2057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Examine deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children's phonological processing skills in relation to a reference group of children with normal hearing (NH) at two baselines pre intervention. Study the effects of computer-assisted phoneme grapheme correspondence training in the children. Specifically analyze possible effects on DHH children's phonological processing skills. Methods: The study included 48 children who participated in a computer-assisted intervention study, which focuses on phoneme grapheme correspondence. Children were 5, 6, and 7 years of age. There were 32 DHH children using cochlear implants (CI) or hearing aids (HA), or both in combination, and 16 children with NH. The study had a quasi-experimental design with three test occasions separated in time by four weeks; baseline 1 and 2 pre intervention, and 3 post intervention. Children performed tasks measuring lexical access, phonological processing, and letter knowledge. All children were asked to practice ten minutes per day at home supported by their parents. Results: NH children outperformed DHH children on the majority of tasks. All children improved their accuracy in phoneme grapheme correspondence and output phonology as a function of the computer-assisted intervention. For the whole group of children, and specifically for children with CI, a lower initial phonological composite score was associated with a larger phonological change between baseline 2 and post intervention. Finally, 18 DHH children, whereof 11 children with CI, showed specific intervention effects on their phonological processing skills, and strong effect sizes for their improved accuracy of phoneme grapheme correspondence. Conclusion: For some DHH children phonological processing skills are boosted relatively more by phoneme grapheme correspondence training. This reflects the reciprocal relationship between phonological change and exposure to and manipulations of letters.

  • 10.
    Renner, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Markelius, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Sundberg, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Brain responses to typical mispronunciations among toddlers2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In first language acquisition research, investigations on the semantics and lexicon of the child are often conducted by measuring brain activity at the surface of the scalp (EEG). Such EEG studies have shown different brain reactions to matching and mismatching pairs of pictures and words from 19-month-olds (Friedrich & Friederici, 2005). Similarly, results from 20-month-olds exposed to auditory stimuli only indicated different brain reactions to correct pronunciations and mispronunciations (Mills et al., 2004). However, these studies do not take the typical production patterns in that specific age into account.

    In the present study, we measured brain reactions of 13 24-month-olds exposed to pairs of pictures and words in four different conditions: correctly pronounced words, two different kinds of mispronounced words, and novel words. The first type of mispronunciations (M1) consisted in minor mispronunciations consistent with typical production patterns in first language acquisition, e.g. ‘ko’ instead of ‘sko’ (shoe). The second type (M2) was characterized by phonological changes that are not expected at 24 months, e.g. ‘fo’ instead of ‘sko’ (shoe). The novel words consisted of phonotactically possible Swedish non-words.

    A principal component analysis (PCA) decomposition of the EEG data showed two patterns of posterior negativity typical of lexical-semantic processing: one for novel words in comparison to the other conditions, and the other for novel and M2 word forms compared to M1 and correct word forms. These results indicate that M1 are processed similar as correct word forms, and that M2 and novel words are processed alike. However, while these patterns were visually salient in successive components, the results were not statistically significant. We suspect that the non-significant results were due to the small dataset. Nevertheless, this study contributes to the discussion on the relationship between perception and production in first language acquisition.

  • 11. Uhlén, Inger
    et al.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    von Mentzer, Cecilia Nakeva
    Lyxell, Björn
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Ors, Marianne
    Using a multi-feature paradigm to measure mismatch responses to minimal sound contrasts in children with cochlear implants and hearing aids2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 58, no 5, p. 409-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our aim was to explore whether a multi-feature paradigm (Optimum-1) for eliciting mismatch negativity (MMN) would objectively capture difficulties in perceiving small sound contrasts in children with hearing impairment (HI) listening through their hearing aids (HAs) and/or cochlear implants (CIs). Children aged 5-7 years with HAs, CIs and children with normal hearing (NH) were tested in a free-field setting using a multi-feature paradigm with deviations in pitch, intensity, gap, duration, and location. There were significant mismatch responses across all subjects that were positive (p-MMR) for the gap and pitch deviants (F(1,43) = 5.17, p = 0.028 and F(1,43) = 6.56, p = 0.014, respectively) and negative (MMN) for the duration deviant (F(1,43) = 4.74, p = 0.035). Only the intensity deviant showed a significant group interaction with MMN in the HA group and p-MMR in the CI group (F(2,43) = 3.40, p = 0.043). The p-MMR correlated negatively with age, with the strongest correlation in the NH subjects. In the CI group, the late discriminative negativity (LDN) was replaced by a late positivity with a significant group interaction for the location deviant. Children with severe HI can be assessed through their hearing device with a fast multi-feature paradigm. For further studies a multi-feature paradigm including more complex speech sounds may better capture variation in auditory processing in these children.

  • 12. Von Mentzer, Cecilia Nakeva
    et al.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Ors, Marianne
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Uhlén, Inger
    Segmental and suprasegmental properties in nonword repetition - An explorative study of the associations with nonword decoding in children with normal hearing and children with bilateral cochlear implants2015In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 216-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored nonword repetition (NWR) and nonword decoding in normal-hearing (NH) children and in children with bilateral cochlear implants (CI). Participants were 11 children, with CI, 5:0-7:11 years (M = 6.5 years), and 11 NH children, individually age-matched to the children with CI. This study fills an important gap in research, since it thoroughly describes detailed aspects of NWR and nonword decoding and their possible associations. All children were assessed after having practiced with a computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach during four weeks. Results showed that NH children outperformed children with CI on the majority of aspects of NWR. The analysis of syllable number in NWR revealed that children with CI made more syllable omissions than did the NH children, and predominantly in prestressed positions. In addition, the consonant cluster analysis in NWR showed significantly more consonant omissions and substitutions in children with CI suggesting that reaching fine-grained levels of phonological processing was particularly difficult for these children. No significant difference was found for nonword-decoding accuracy between the groups, as measured by whole words correct and phonemes correct, but differences were observed regarding error patterns. In children with CI phoneme, deletions occurred significantly more often than in children with NH. The correlation analysis revealed that the ability to repeat consonant clusters in NWR had the strongest associations to nonword decoding in both groups. The absence of as frequent significant associations between NWR and nonword decoding in children with CI compared to children with NH suggest that these children partly use other decoding strategies to compensate for less precise phonological knowledge, for example, lexicalizations in nonword decoding, specifically, making a real word of a nonword.

  • 13. von Mentzer, Cecilia Nakeva
    et al.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Ors, Marianne
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach for children using cochlear implants or hearing aids2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 55, no 5, p. 448-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examined computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach for deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children in Sweden using cochlear implants or hearing aids, or a combination of both. The study included 48 children, 5, 6 and 7years of age. Sixteen children with normal hearing (NH) served as a reference group. The first purpose of the study was to compare NH and DHH children's reading ability at pre and post-intervention. The second purpose was to investigate effects of the intervention. Cognitive and demographic factors were analyzed in relation to reading improvement. Results showed no statistically significant difference for reading ability at the group level, although NH children showed overall higher reading scores at both test points. Age comparisons revealed a statistically significant higher reading ability in the NH 7-year-olds compared to the DHH 7-year-olds. The intervention proved successful for word decoding accuracy, passage comprehension and as a reduction of nonword decoding errors in both NH and DHH children. Reading improvement was associated with complex working memory and phonological processing skills in NH children. Correspondent associations were observed with visual working memory and letter knowledge in the DHH children. Age was the only demographic factor that was significantly correlated with reading improvement. The results suggest that DHH children's beginning reading may be influenced by visual strategies that might explain the reading delay in the older children.

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