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  • 1.
    Grönqvist, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nilsson, J. Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Robling, Per Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Childhood Lead Exposure and Criminal Behavior: Lessons from the Swedish Phase-Out of Leaded Gasoline2014Report (Other academic)
  • 2. Jans, Jenny
    et al.
    Johansson, Per
    Nilsson, J. Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. Uppsala Center for Labor Studies (UCLS), Sweden.
    Economic status, air quality, and child health: Evidence from inversion episodes2018In: Journal of Health Economics, ISSN 0167-6296, E-ISSN 1879-1646, Vol. 61, p. 220-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Normally, the temperature decreases with altitude, allowing air pollutants to rise and disperse. During inversion episodes, warmer air at higher altitude traps air pollutants at the ground. By merging vertical temperature profile data from NASA with pollution monitors and health care records, we show that inversions increase the PM10 levels by 25% and children's respiratory health problems by 5.5%. Low-income children are particularly affected, and differences in baseline health seem to be a key mediating factor behind the effect of pollution on the SES health gap. Policies that improve dissemination of information on inversion status may hence improve child health, either through private action or via policies that curb emissions during inversion episodes.

  • 3. Jans, Jenny
    et al.
    Johansson, Per
    Nilsson, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Economic Status, Air Quality, and Child Health: evidence from Inversion Episodes2014Report (Other academic)
  • 4. Johansson, Per
    et al.
    Karimi, Arizo
    Nilsson, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. Uppsala Center for Labor Studies, Sweden.
    Worker absenteeism: peer influences, monitoring and job flexibility2018In: Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series A (Statistics in Society), ISSN 0964-1998, E-ISSN 1467-985XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study the presence of other‐regarding preferences in the workplace by exploiting a randomized experiment that changed the monitoring of workers’ health during sick leave. We show that workers’ response to an increase in co‐worker shirking, induced by the experiment, is much stronger than the response to a decrease in co‐worker shirking. The asymmetric spillover effects are consistent with evidence of fairness concerns documented in laboratory experiments. Moreover, we find that the spillover effect is driven by workers with highly flexible and autonomous jobs, suggesting that co‐worker monitoring may be at least as important as formal monitoring in alleviating shirking.

  • 5. Johansson, Per-Olov
    et al.
    Karimi, Arizo
    Nilsson, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. IFAU, Uppsala University; Uppsala Center for Labor Studies.
    Gender differences in shirking: monitoring or social preferences? : evidence from a field experiment2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies gender differences in the extent to which social preferences affect workers’ shirking decisions. Using exogenous variation in work absence induced by a randomized field experiment that increased treated workers’ absence, we find that also nontreated workers increased their absence as a response. Furthermore, we find that male workers react more strongly to decreased monitoring, but no significant gender difference in the extent to which workers are influenced by peers. However, our results suggest significant heterogeneity in the degree of influence that male and female workers exert on each other: conditional on the potential exposure to same-sex co-workers, men are only affected by their male peers, and women are only affected by their female peers.

  • 6. Kolsrud, Jonas
    et al.
    Landais, Camille
    Nilsson, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Spinnewijn, Johannes
    The optimal timing of unemployment benefits: theory and evidence from Sweden2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a simple, yet general framework to analyze the optimal time profile of benefits during the unemployment spell. We derive simple sufficient-statistics formulae capturing the insurance value and incentive costs of unemployment benefits paid at different times during the unemployment spell. Our general approach allows to revisit and evaluate in a transparent way the separate arguments for inclining or declining profiles put forward in the theoretical literature. We then estimate our sufficient statistics using administrative data on unemployment, income and wealth in Sweden. First, we exploit duration-dependent kinks in the replacement rate and find that the moral hazard cost of benefits is larger when paid earlier in the spell. Second, we find that the drop in consumption determining the insurance value of benefits is large from the start of the spell, but further increases throughout the spell.

    On average, savings and credit play a limited role in smoothing consumption. Our evidence therefore indicates that the recent change from a flat to a declining benefit profile in Sweden has decreased welfare. In fact, the local welfare gains push towards an increasing rather than decreasing benefit profile over the spell.

  • 7. Kolsrud, Jonas
    et al.
    Landais, Camille
    Nilsson, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Spinnewijn, Johannes
    The Optimal Timing of Unemployment Benefits: Theory and Evidence from Sweden2018In: The American Economic Review, ISSN 0002-8282, E-ISSN 1944-7981, Vol. 108, no 4-5, p. 985-1033Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a simple, yet robust framework to evaluate the time profile of benefits paid during an unemployment spell. We derive sufficient-statistics formulae capturing the marginal insurance value and incentive costs of unemployment-benefits paid at different times during a spell. Our approach allows us to revisit separate arguments for inclining or declining profiles put forward in the theoretical literature and to identify welfare-improving-changes in the benefit profile that account for all relevant arguments jointly: For the empirical implementation, we use administrative data on unemployment, linked to data on consumption, income, and wealth in Sweden. First, we exploit duration-dependent kinks in the replacement rate and find that, if anything, the moral hazard cost of benefits is larger when paid earlier the spell. Second, we find that the drop in consumption affecting the insurance value of benefits is large from the start of the spell, hut further increases throughout tie spell. In trading off insurance and incentives, our analysis suggests that the flat benefit profile in Sweden has been too generous overall. However, both from the insurance and the incentives side, we find no evidence to support the introduction of a declining tilt in the profile.

  • 8.
    Nilsson, J. Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. Uppsala University, Sweden; Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy, Sweden.
    Alcohol Availability, Prenatal Conditions, and Long-Term Economic Outcomes2017In: Journal of Political Economy, ISSN 0022-3808, E-ISSN 1537-534X, Vol. 125, no 4, p. 1149-1207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how a policy that sharply increased alcohol availability during 8.5 months affected the labor productivity of those exposed to it in utero. Compared to the surrounding cohorts, the prenatally exposed children have substantially worse labor market and educational outcomes and lower cognitive and noncognitive ability. Effects on earnings are found throughout the distribution but are largest below the median. Males are more affected than females, consistent with growing evidence that boys are less resilient to early environmental insults. The long-term effects seem primarily driven by changes in prenatal health rather than changes in the childhood environment.

  • 9.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Starkölsförsöket: från fosterstadiet till vuxen ålder2014Report (Other academic)
1 - 9 of 9
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