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  • 1.
    Anderhag, Per
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education, Department of Curriculum Studies and Communication .
    Den svårformulerade evolutionen: gränssnittets och innehållets betydelse för de meningar om evolutionen som erbjuds användaren av tre digitala läromedel i biologi2003Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Anderhag, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Taste for Science: How can teaching make a difference for students’ interest in science?2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of the thesis is to describe and analyse aspects of home background and teaching that may be important for students’ capability and will to participate in science. The purpose is to make explicit how teaching can support students in developing an interest in science and so counter-balance the restricted opportunities some students may have due to upbringing. In study 1 population data is used to make evident what associations there are between home background variables and the students’ choice of applying for the Swedish post-compulsory Natural Science Programme (NSP). The findings show that home background is important for Swedish students’ choice of the NSP but also that some lower secondary schools can make a difference. Students’ interest in science has usually been examined through questionnaires and rarely studied as constituted in classroom action as a result of teaching. In study 2 therefore an action-oriented methodology is developed based on the concept of taste to study what difference a teacher can make for the constitution of interest in the science classroom. The concept of taste is grounded in pragmatism and the works of Pierre Bourdieu and acknowledges the affective, normative, and cognitive dimensions of situated science learning. In study 3 this methodology is used to examine how a teacher located through Study 1 supports his students in developing an interest in science. The results of study 3 suggest how teaching can make the object of science the focus of students’ interest and so showing that science, with its aims, norms, and values, can be enjoyed in itself. Study 4 draws on the findings of studies 1-3 to discuss the possibility of an overlooked field in studying interest in science; namely whether primary, secondary, tertiary students in effect have different objects of interest. The findings of studies 1-4 are used to discuss how teaching may make a difference to a continued student interest in science.

  • 3.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Danielsson Thorell, Helena
    Andersson, Carina
    Holst, Andreas
    Nordling, Johan
    Syften och tillfälligheter i högstadie- och gymnasielaborationen: en studie om hur elever handlar i relation till aktivitetens mål2014In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 63-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purposes and contingencies in the lower and upper secondary school lab

    Studies have shown that students’ awareness of the goals and purposes of the laboratory activity is important for their possibility to participate in and learn from the activity. While practical activities often have been considered to be a central part of science education, relatively few studies have examined laboratory work in situ. In this paper we addressed these issues by examining (a) what purposes are distinguished when students’ work with a laboratory assignment and (b) how these purposes are made continuous with the teacher’s aim with the assignment. The data was based on classroom observations from two ordinary laboratory settings, one from a chemistry class in lower secondary school and one from a physics class in the natural science programme in upper secondary school. Although both student groups acknowledged their teacher’s intentions with the practical and could act towards the more student centered purposes of the activity, e.g. describe what happens with the copper and measure the speed of a small vessel respectively, there were differences regarding the possibilities the students had to act toward the activity’s final aim. The results showed that these factors can be referred to the amount of purposes introduced by the teacher as well as those that arose because of contingences, and the connection of these purposes to students’ prior experiences.

  • 4.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Emanuelsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hamza, Karim Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Students' choice of post-compulsory science: In search of schools that compensate for the socio-economic background of their students2013In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 35, no 18, p. 3141-3160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is commonly argued that socio-economic inequalities can explain many of the differences in achievement and participation in science education that have been reported among countries and among schools within a country. We addressed this issue by examining (a) the relationship between variables associated with socio-economic background and application frequencies to the Swedish Natural Science Programme (NSP) in upper secondary school and (b) whether there are lower secondary schools in Sweden that seem to compensate for these variables. Data from Statistics Sweden (SCB) covering the whole population of 106,483 ninth-grade students were used to calculate the probability for each student to apply to the NSP. Our results indicate that the variables, such as parental educational level and grades, have explanatory power, but with varying effect for different subpopulations of students. For example, grades in mathematics have a greater impact than grades in science for females’ choice of the NSP. The opposite holds for male students. Out of 1,342 schools, 158 deviated significantly from predicted, that is, the students in these schools applied to the NSP in greater or lesser extent than expected. The number of deviating schools is greater than predicted by pure random variation. This suggests that variables of socio-economic background are only a partial explanation of the application frequencies, and that the deviation needs to be investigated further. Our findings suggest that in order to understand why schools deviate positively and so compensate for the socio-economic background of their students, we need to study their practices more closely

  • 5.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hamza, Karim Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    What can a teacher do to support students’ interest in science?: A study of the constitution of taste in a science classroom2015In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 749-784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we examined how a teacher may make a difference to the way interest develops in a science classroom, especially for students from disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds. We adopted a methodology based on the concept of taste for science drawing on the work of John Dewey and Pierre Bourdieu. We investigated through transcripts from video recordings how such a taste is socially constituted in a 9th grade (ages 15–16) science classroom, where there was evidence that the teacher was making a positive difference to students’ post-compulsory school choice with regard to science. Salient findings regarding how this teacher supported students’ interest are summarized. For example, the teacher consistently followed up how the students acknowledged and enjoyed purposes, norms, and values of the science practice and so ensuing that they could participate successfully. During these instances, feelings and personal contributions of the students were also acknowledged and made continuous with the scientific practice. The results were compared with earlier research, implications are discussed, and some suggestions are given about how these can be used by teachers in order to support student interest.

  • 6.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Hepler, P. K.
    Lazzaro, M. D.
    Microtubules and microfilaments are both responsible for pollen tube elongation in the coniferPicea abies (Norway spruce)2000In: Protoplasma, ISSN 0033-183X, E-ISSN 1615-6102, Vol. 214, no 3, p. 141-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    InPicea abies (Norway spruce), microtubules and actin microfllaments both form a dense matrix throughout the tube mainly parallel to the direction of elongation. In these conifer pollen tubes the organization of this matrix is different from that in angiosperms. This study tests our hypothesis that differences in cytoskeletal organization are responsible for differences in tube growth and physiology. Pollen grains were germinated in media containing cytoskeletal disrupters and analyzed for germination, tube length, tube branching, and tip swelling. Disruption of microtubules significantly inhibits tube elongation and induces tube branching and tip swelling. Tip swelling is probably caused by disruption of the microtubules in the tip that are perpendicular to the direction of elongation. Confocal microscopy indicates that colchicine and propyzamide cause fragmentation of microtubules throughout the tube. Oryzalin and amiprophosmethyl cause a complete loss of microtubules from the tip back toward the tube midpoint but leave microtubules intact from the midpoint back to the grain. Disruption of microfilaments by cytochalasins B and D and inhibition of myosin by N-ethylmaleimide or 2,3-butanedione monoxime stops tube growth and inhibits germination. Microfilament disruption induces short branches in tubes, probably originating from defective microfilament organization behind the tip. In addition, confocal microscopy coupled with microinjection of fluorescein-labeled phalloidin into actively growing pollen tubes indicates that microfllament bundles extend into the plastid-free zone at the tip but are specifically excluded from the growing tip. We conclude that microtubules and microfilaments coordinate to drive tip extension in conifer pollen tubes in a model that differs from angiosperms.

  • 7.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Selander, Staffan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Eva, Svärdemo-Åberg
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Interaktivitet och hypertextualitet: om digital konmmunikation och digitala läromedel2015In: Utm@ningar och e-frestelser: IT och skolans lärkultur / [ed] Roger Säljö, Jonas Linderoth, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2015, 2. uppl., no 2Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    An evalutation of how NTA is helping schools to attain the Science Studies syllabus goals at the grade 5 level2007Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Signs of taste for science: A methodology for studying the constitution of interest in the science classroom.2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Taste for science: bridging the Cartesian divide between interest and cognitive learning in science?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotions, aesthetics and affect are natural elements in everyday science classroom practice, but our understanding of their role for learning in science is limited. It has been suggested that the epistemological tradition of approaching human conduct as essentially separated intovarious dualisms, such as social-mental, emotion-cognition, fact-value, body-mind and so forth, can explain why affect and learning have received so relatively little attention from the science education research field. This theoretical paper addresses some of these issues by discussing how the concept of taste, which is grounded in the works of Pierre Bourdieu and pragmatism research on aesthetics and learning, can be used for approaching cognition, norms, and values as simultaneously transacted in classroom action.

  • 11.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Bergqvist, Kerstin
    Jakobson, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hamza, Karim Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Saljo, Roger
    Why Do Secondary School Students Lose Their Interest in Science? Or Does it Never Emerge? A Possible and Overlooked Explanation2016In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 100, no 5, p. 791-813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we review research on how students' interest in science changes through the primary to secondary school transition. In the literature, the findings generally show that primary students enjoy science but come to lose interest during secondary school. As this claim is based mainly on interview and questionnaire data, that is on secondary reports from students about their interest in science, these results are reexamined through our own extensive material from primary and secondary school on how interest is constituted through classroom discourse. Our results suggest the possibility that primary students do not lose their interest in science, but rather that an interest in science is never constituted. The overview indicates that studies relying on interviews and questionnaires make it difficult to ascertain what the actual object of interest is when students act in the science classroom. The possibility suggested should, if valid, have consequences for science education and be worthy of further examination.

  • 12.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hamza, Karim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    What difference can a teacher make for the constitution of taste in the science classroom?:  2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hamza, Karim Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    How can teaching make a difference to students’ interest in science? Including Bourdieuan field analysis2015In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 377-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we respond to the discussion by Alexandra Schindel Dimick regarding how the taste analysis presented in our feature article can be expanded within a Bourdieuan framework. Here we acknowledge the significance of field theory to introduce wider reflexivity on the kind of taste that is constituted in the science classroom, while we at the same time emphasize the importance of differentiating between how taste is reproduced versus how it is changed through teaching. The contribution of our methodology is mainly to offer the possibility to empirically analyze changes in this taste, and how teaching can make a difference in regard to students’ home backgrounds. However, our last two steps of our taste analysis include asking questions about how the taste developing in the classroom relates more widely in society. Schindel Dimick shows how these two steps can be productively expanded by a wider societal field analysis.

  • 14.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hamza, Karim Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Signs of taste for science: a methodology for studying the constitution of interest in the science classroom2015In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 339-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a methodological approach for analyzing the transformation of interest in science through classroom talk and action. To this end, we use the construct of taste for scienceas a social and communicative operationalization, or proxy, to the more psychologically oriented construct of interest. To gain a taste for science as part of school science activities means developing habits of performing and valuing certain distinctions about ways to talk, act and be that are jointly construed as belonging in the school science classroom. In this view, to learn science is not only about learning the curriculum content, but also about learning a normative and aesthetic content in terms of habits of distinguishing and valuing. The approach thus complements previous studies on students’ interest in science, by making it possible to analyze how taste for science is constituted, moment-by-moment, through talk and action in the science classroom. In developing the method, we supplement theoretical constructs coming from pragmatism and Pierre Bourdieu with empirical data from a lower secondary science classroom. The application of the method to this classroom demonstrates the potential that the approach has for analyzing how conceptual, normative, and aesthetic distinctions within the science classroom interact in the constitution of taste for, and thereby potentially also in the development of interest in science among students.

  • 15.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Jakobson, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hamza, Karim Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Why do secondary school students lose their interest in science?: A possible overlooked explanationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Jakobson, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Anderhag, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Taste and aesthetics in science education2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the result of more than ten years of research transforming John Dewey’s writings into operational concepts that can be used to study empirically how education influences students’ interest and learning in school. Here we report results from science education on how (1) aesthetic experience and its continuity with learning and participation can be studied in classrooms, (2) such studies can be employed to meliorate school practice, and (3) this conceptual apparatus has been employed to study the formation of taste and interest in classrooms beyond that which students accrued because of their home background. To support the theoretical basis of these studies they also draw on Ludwig Wittgenstein’s philosophical investigations into language and Pierre Bourdieu’s macro-sociological studies of French society. The validity of this perhaps surprising combination of scholars will be supported pragmatically by how their methodological and conceptual developments can be made continuous for the purpose of better coping with (1)–(3).

1 - 16 of 16
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