Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 106
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Brickhouse, Nancy
    University of Delaware.
    Lederman, Judith S.
    Illinois Institute of Technology.
    Lederman, Norman G.
    Illinois Institute of Technology.
    Ligozat, Florence
    University of Geneva, Schweiz.
    Östman, Leif
    Uppsala universitet.
    Sadler, Troy D.
    University of Florida.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Zeidler, Dana L.
    University of South Florida.
    Exploring themes of scientific literacy2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Emanuelsson, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hamza, Karim Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Students' choice of post-compulsory science: In search of schools that compensate for the socio-economic background of their students2013In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 35, no 18, p. 3141-3160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is commonly argued that socio-economic inequalities can explain many of the differences in achievement and participation in science education that have been reported among countries and among schools within a country. We addressed this issue by examining (a) the relationship between variables associated with socio-economic background and application frequencies to the Swedish Natural Science Programme (NSP) in upper secondary school and (b) whether there are lower secondary schools in Sweden that seem to compensate for these variables. Data from Statistics Sweden (SCB) covering the whole population of 106,483 ninth-grade students were used to calculate the probability for each student to apply to the NSP. Our results indicate that the variables, such as parental educational level and grades, have explanatory power, but with varying effect for different subpopulations of students. For example, grades in mathematics have a greater impact than grades in science for females’ choice of the NSP. The opposite holds for male students. Out of 1,342 schools, 158 deviated significantly from predicted, that is, the students in these schools applied to the NSP in greater or lesser extent than expected. The number of deviating schools is greater than predicted by pure random variation. This suggests that variables of socio-economic background are only a partial explanation of the application frequencies, and that the deviation needs to be investigated further. Our findings suggest that in order to understand why schools deviate positively and so compensate for the socio-economic background of their students, we need to study their practices more closely

  • 3.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hamza, Karim Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    What can a teacher do to support students’ interest in science?: A study of the constitution of taste in a science classroom2015In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 749-784Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we examined how a teacher may make a difference to the way interest develops in a science classroom, especially for students from disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds. We adopted a methodology based on the concept of taste for science drawing on the work of John Dewey and Pierre Bourdieu. We investigated through transcripts from video recordings how such a taste is socially constituted in a 9th grade (ages 15–16) science classroom, where there was evidence that the teacher was making a positive difference to students’ post-compulsory school choice with regard to science. Salient findings regarding how this teacher supported students’ interest are summarized. For example, the teacher consistently followed up how the students acknowledged and enjoyed purposes, norms, and values of the science practice and so ensuing that they could participate successfully. During these instances, feelings and personal contributions of the students were also acknowledged and made continuous with the scientific practice. The results were compared with earlier research, implications are discussed, and some suggestions are given about how these can be used by teachers in order to support student interest.

  • 4.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    An evalutation of how NTA is helping schools to attain the Science Studies syllabus goals at the grade 5 level2007Report (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Signs of taste for science: A methodology for studying the constitution of interest in the science classroom.2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Taste for science: bridging the Cartesian divide between interest and cognitive learning in science?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Emotions, aesthetics and affect are natural elements in everyday science classroom practice, but our understanding of their role for learning in science is limited. It has been suggested that the epistemological tradition of approaching human conduct as essentially separated intovarious dualisms, such as social-mental, emotion-cognition, fact-value, body-mind and so forth, can explain why affect and learning have received so relatively little attention from the science education research field. This theoretical paper addresses some of these issues by discussing how the concept of taste, which is grounded in the works of Pierre Bourdieu and pragmatism research on aesthetics and learning, can be used for approaching cognition, norms, and values as simultaneously transacted in classroom action.

  • 7.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Bergqvist, Kerstin
    Jakobson, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hamza, Karim Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Saljo, Roger
    Why Do Secondary School Students Lose Their Interest in Science? Or Does it Never Emerge? A Possible and Overlooked Explanation2016In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 100, no 5, p. 791-813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we review research on how students' interest in science changes through the primary to secondary school transition. In the literature, the findings generally show that primary students enjoy science but come to lose interest during secondary school. As this claim is based mainly on interview and questionnaire data, that is on secondary reports from students about their interest in science, these results are reexamined through our own extensive material from primary and secondary school on how interest is constituted through classroom discourse. Our results suggest the possibility that primary students do not lose their interest in science, but rather that an interest in science is never constituted. The overview indicates that studies relying on interviews and questionnaires make it difficult to ascertain what the actual object of interest is when students act in the science classroom. The possibility suggested should, if valid, have consequences for science education and be worthy of further examination.

  • 8.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hamza, Karim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    What difference can a teacher make for the constitution of taste in the science classroom?:  2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hamza, Karim Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    How can teaching make a difference to students’ interest in science? Including Bourdieuan field analysis2015In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 377-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we respond to the discussion by Alexandra Schindel Dimick regarding how the taste analysis presented in our feature article can be expanded within a Bourdieuan framework. Here we acknowledge the significance of field theory to introduce wider reflexivity on the kind of taste that is constituted in the science classroom, while we at the same time emphasize the importance of differentiating between how taste is reproduced versus how it is changed through teaching. The contribution of our methodology is mainly to offer the possibility to empirically analyze changes in this taste, and how teaching can make a difference in regard to students’ home backgrounds. However, our last two steps of our taste analysis include asking questions about how the taste developing in the classroom relates more widely in society. Schindel Dimick shows how these two steps can be productively expanded by a wider societal field analysis.

  • 10.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hamza, Karim Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Signs of taste for science: a methodology for studying the constitution of interest in the science classroom2015In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 339-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a methodological approach for analyzing the transformation of interest in science through classroom talk and action. To this end, we use the construct of taste for scienceas a social and communicative operationalization, or proxy, to the more psychologically oriented construct of interest. To gain a taste for science as part of school science activities means developing habits of performing and valuing certain distinctions about ways to talk, act and be that are jointly construed as belonging in the school science classroom. In this view, to learn science is not only about learning the curriculum content, but also about learning a normative and aesthetic content in terms of habits of distinguishing and valuing. The approach thus complements previous studies on students’ interest in science, by making it possible to analyze how taste for science is constituted, moment-by-moment, through talk and action in the science classroom. In developing the method, we supplement theoretical constructs coming from pragmatism and Pierre Bourdieu with empirical data from a lower secondary science classroom. The application of the method to this classroom demonstrates the potential that the approach has for analyzing how conceptual, normative, and aesthetic distinctions within the science classroom interact in the constitution of taste for, and thereby potentially also in the development of interest in science among students.

  • 11.
    Anderhag, Per
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Jakobson, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hamza, Karim Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Why do secondary school students lose their interest in science?: A possible overlooked explanationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lager Nyqvist, Lotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Students' Ways of Using Prior Experience in Inquiry Based Science Education – the case of NTA2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inquiry has been identified as a 'key-approach' and recommended as an important pedagogy to improve primary science education in Europe. Inquiry is also a key component in the US national science education standards. In Sweden, inquiry pedagogy in primary science has been introduced through a large curriculum program called NTA (Science and Technology for all). The aim of this paper is to shed light on what inquiry based science education (IBSE) practices are emerging in Swedish primary schools through the introduction of the NTA-program and what activities students are engaging in, in these practices. In particular we focus on ways of working with 'what is already known' which is held to be a central aspect to IBSE in e.g. the definition of inquiry in the US national science education standards. The research questions investigated are: In what actions do students engage in when working with ‘what is already known’ in IBSE practice? How is 'what is already known' acted with in practice? Data was collected, during a 10-week-period using video- and audiotape recordings of classroom work, in two 6th grade classes where teachers and students worked with an NTA-unit called 'the Chemistry of food'. Our analysis is conceptualized within a cultural-historical activity-theoretical perspective. Results show that students participate in three different actions: A) separation of tasks, B) playing the lottery and C) challenging test results with ‘what is already known’. These different actions involve different types of use of 'what is already known' , and the actions correspond to, and acquire meaning in relation to, different goals. Common to the different ways of working is that we can discern two different types of ‘what is already known’: (1) referring to facts, and (2) making use of ideas about science culture.

  • 13.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Remembering as access points for scientific literacy2013In: EARLI 2013 Book of Abstracts, 2013, p. 1053-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A central issue for educational research is how education may contribute to the personal development of children. A condition for developing such classroom practices is that access points to shared experiences are established in the classroom. The aim of this contribution is to illustrate how remembering can be understood as a situated and transformational activity shared by students and teachers in finding access points to scientific literacy. We ask how shared remembering functions as a pedagogical arrangement to make teaching experiences in science available for students’ continued reflection. Memories are often treated in education as entities being stored in the brain and which can be retrieved on demand. When approached from a sociocultural, situative and pragmatic perspective, memory does not come ready-made. Here, we draw on a six-week Chemistry project in primary school. We analyse one episode from a teacher-led group conversation where students report their ‘inquiry-home-work’ on the water-solubility of different food. This pedagogical sequence is an example of an arrangement with a purpose to make inquiry aspects of scientific literacy available to students through remembering. We find that the teacher draws on a broad repertoire of ways to construct a collective narrative of inquiry. The remembering requires joint negotiation of what is to be remembered. This joint negotiation has conceptual consequences in that it is simultaneously a negotiation of what instances qualify as examples of the phenomena of solubility and of what is necessary to make explicit in order to reflect upon the qualities of inquiry work.

  • 14.
    Andrée, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lager-Nyqvist, Lotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Remembering as Instructional Work in the Science Classroom2017In: Memory Practices and Learning: Interactional, Institutional and Sociocultural Perspectives / [ed] Åsa Mäkitalo, Per Linell, Roger Säljö, Information Age Publishing, 2017, p. 75-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15. Farrin, Firozi
    et al.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    En metod för planering och formativ bedömning2014In: Lärande i handling: en pragmatisk didaktik / [ed] Britt Jakobson, Iann Lundegård och Per-Olof Wickman, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, p. 79-88Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Gyllenpalm, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Experiments" and the Inquiry Emphasis Conflation in Science Teacher Education2011In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 95, no 5, p. 908-926Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the use and role of the term experiment in science teacher education as described by teacher students. Data were collected through focus group interviews conducted at seven occasions with 32 students from six well-known Swedish universities. The theoretical framework is a sociocultural and pragmatist perspective on language and learning with the analysis based on the notion of pivot terms, introduced in an earlier article, to operationalize language use as habit and mediated action. The term experiment was found to be conflated with laboratory task and referred to as primarily a pedagogical activity in contrast to a research methodology, in line with the previously described inquiry emphasis conflation. The notion of controlled experiment was unfamiliar to most students and had not been explicitly discussed in terms of research methodology during their teacher education. The pedagogical meaning given to the term experiment is discussed in contrast to its use and function in scientific research. The possible problems of this conflation of terms are discussed in relation to the educational goal of teaching students about the nature of scientific inquiry. Recommendations for teacher education are discussed, and a heuristic model to use pivot terms to facilitate explicit reflection on unexamined customs of science education is introduced.

  • 17.
    Gyllenpalm, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    The Uses of the Term Hypothesis and the Inquiry Emphasis Conflation in Science Teacher Education2011In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 33, no 14, p. 1993-2015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the use and role of the term 'hypothesis' in science teacher education as described by teacher students. Data were collected through focus group interviews conducted at seven occasions with 32 students from six well-known Swedish universities. The theoretical framework is a sociocultural and pragmatist perspective on language and learning, introducing the notion of pivot terms to operationalise language use as a habit and mediated action. We describe three different customs of using the term 'hypothesis' within four cultural institutions that can be said to constitute science teacher education in Sweden. Students were found to habitually use the term hypothesis as meaning a guess about an outcome. This is contrasted to the function of this term in scientific research as a tentative explanation. We also found differences in how this term was used between the pure science courses given by the science departments of universities and science education courses taken only by teacher students. Findings also included further support for school students hypothesis fear reported in an earlier study. It is discussed how these findings can obstruct learning and teaching about the nature of scientific inquiry. Constructivist theories of learning are suggested as a possible origin of these problems. The findings are also related to curricular reform and development.

  • 18.
    Gyllenpalm, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    The Uses of the Term Hypothesis and the Inquiry Emphasis Conflation in Science Teacher Education2011In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 33, no 14, p. 1993-2015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the use and role of the term ‘hypothesis’ in science teacher education as described by teacher students. Data were collected through focus group interviews conducted at seven occasions with 32 students from six well‐known Swedish universities. The theoretical framework is a sociocultural and pragmatist perspective on language and learning, introducing the notion of pivot terms to operationalise language use as a habit and mediated action. We describe three different customs of using the term ‘hypothesis’ within four cultural institutions that can be said to constitute science teacher education in Sweden. Students were found to habitually use the term hypothesis as meaning a guess about an outcome. This is contrasted to the function of this term in scientific research as a tentative explanation. We also found differences in how this term was used between the pure science courses given by the science departments of universities and science education courses taken only by teacher students. Findings also included further support for school students hypothesis fear reported in an earlier study. It is discussed how these findings can obstruct learning and teaching about the nature of scientific inquiry. Constructivist theories of learning are suggested as a possible origin of these problems. The findings are also related to curricular reform and development.

  • 19.
    Gyllenpalm, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Holmgren, Sven-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Secondary science teachers’ selective traditions and examples of inquiry-oriented approaches2010In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 44-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes aspects of the existing tradition of practical work in secondary science education in Sweden, with a focus on inquiry-oriented teaching approaches. Twelve secondary science teachers were interviewed and asked to describe examples of their own teaching practices that they believed constituted inquiry-oriented teaching. The descriptions are analysed in relation to key components of inquiry as conceptualised in the science education literature. In addition, the teachers’ way of talking about their own teaching in relation to inquiry is described and analysed. The results show a wide variety of teaching approaches that are associated with inquiry in different ways. Although inquiry is valued by many teachers, it is also problematic. We discuss the nature of the problems associated with inquiry by the teachers and the possible consequences of these for teacher education, in-service training and curriculum development.

  • 20.
    Gyllenpalm, Jakob
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Holmgren, Sven-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Teachers' language on scientific inquiry: Methods of teaching or methods of inquiry?2010In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 1151-1172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With a focus on the use of language related to scientific inquiry, this paper explores how 12 secondary school science teachers describe instances of students’ practical work in their science classes. The purpose of the study was to shed light on the culture and traditions of secondary school science teaching related to inquiry as expressed in the use of language. Data consisted of semi-structured interviews about actual inquiry units used by the teachers. These were used to situate the discussion of their teaching in a real context. The theoretical background is sociocultural and pragmatist views on the role of language in science learning. The analysis focuses on two concepts of scientific inquiry: hypothesis and experiment. It is shown that the teachers tend to use these terms with a pedagogical function thus conflating methods of teaching with methods of inquiry as part of an emphasis on teaching the children the correct explanation. The teachers did not prioritise an understanding of scientific inquiry as a knowledge goal. It discusses how learners’ possibilities to learn about the characteristics of scientific inquiry and the nature of science are affected by an unreflective use of everyday discourse.

  • 21.
    Hamza, Karim Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Beyond Explanations: What Else Do Students Need to Understand Science?2009In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 93, p. 1026-1049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Students’ difficulties with learning science have generally been framed in terms of their generalized conceptual knowledge of a science topic as elicited through their explanations of natural phenomena. In this paper, we empirically explore what more goes into giving a scientific account of a natural phenomenon than giving such generalized explanations. We audio-recorded pairs of upper secondary students during lab-work in electrochemistry. We used a situative and pragmatist approach to study learning in action. This approach made it possible to study how the particulars and contingencies of working with a real electrochemical cell went into students’ reasoning. Our results show that students needed to learn to make distinctions, recognize, and name the particulars in encounters with their cell. They also needed to learn what counts as reasonable readings and to deal with quantitative issues and correlations pertaining to their cell. We refer to these additional learning requirements as the students’ taxonomic and measurement interests. Implications for what is involved in giving a scientific account of a natural phenomenon in school are discussed. The study constitutes an attempt to include, in a systematic way, also the particulars and contingencies of actual practice in an account of students’ reasoning in science.

  • 22.
    Hamza, Karim Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Student Engagement with Artefacts and Scientific Ideas in a Laboratory and a Concept-Mapping Activity2013In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 35, no 13, p. 2254-2277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to use a comparative approach to scrutinize the common assumption that certain school science activities are theoretical and therefore particularly suited for engaging students with scientific ideas, whereas others are practical and, thus, not equally conducive to engagement with scientific ideas. We compared two school science activities, one (laboratory work) that is commonly regarded as focusing attention on artefacts that may distract students from central science concepts and the other (concept mapping) that is thought to make students focus directly on these concepts. We observed students in either a laboratory activity about real galvanic cells or a concept-mapping activity about idealized galvanic cells. We used a practical epistemology analysis to compare the two activities regarding students' actions towards scientific ideas and artefacts. The comparison revealed that the two activities, despite their alleged differences along the theory–practice scale, primarily resulted in similar student actions. For instance, in both activities, students interacted extensively with artefacts and, to a lesser extent, with scientific ideas. However, only occasionally did students establish any explicit continuity between artefacts and scientific ideas. The findings indicate that some of the problems commonly considered to be unique for school science practical work may indeed be a feature of school science activities more generally.

  • 23.
    Hamza, Karim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Palm, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Sturebyskolan, Sweden.
    Palmqvist, Jenny
    Piqueras, Jesús
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hybridization of practices in teacher-researcher collaboration2018In: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 170-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present experiences from a joint collaborative research project which may be described as an encounter between a school science teaching practice and a university science didactics research practice. We provide narratives which demonstrate how the encounter between these two communities of practice interacted to produce hybridization between the two in terms of mutual influences, resulting in the conceptual and practical development of both communities of practice. We argue that what happened in the project suggests one way of reducing the gap between educational research and teaching through the emergence of practices where the roles of teachers and researchers become blurred.

  • 24.
    Hamza, Karim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Piqueras, Jesus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Angelin, Marcus
    Vetenskapens hus.
    Risk taking and change in a science teacher professional development program2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this presentation we show how a certain critical event contributed to teacher change in a professional development program in a Swedish secondary school. The professional development program was part of a wider research project focusing on how knowledge stemming from science education research can support science teachers’ day-to-day work with improving teaching. We collected video data from thirteen meetings between science education researchers and teachers taking place before and after three teaching cycles. We also video recorded all lessons comprising the three cycles. We employed Clarke and Hollingsworth’s interconnected model of teacher professional growth to analyze what consequences interactions between teachers and researchers had for teacher change. Here, we focus on one aspect of these analyses, viz., the crucial consequences which followed as the researchers took increased responsibility for implementing the newly introduced knowledge in the teachers’ practice. Thus, following an initial stage in which the newly introduced concepts did not have any sustained consequences for the teachers’ practice, the researchers decided to take a considerably higher risk concerning their own contribution in the program. This was done by (a) making explicit commitments regarding the positive consequences of employing the research based knowledge and (b) providing the teachers with thorough analyses and attendant concrete suggestions for how to change practice on the basis of this knowledge. This change in the researchers’ assumption of responsibility for the outcome of the project resulted in distinct teacher change, visible as the teachers (1) acknowledged salient outcomes of the researchers contributions, (2) suddenly took over the new vocabulary and (3) consistently began to employ the knowledge in their own planning, in talk between themselves and the researchers as well as in artifacts such as planning documents. The results have implications for how we view the role of researchers in professional development.

  • 25.
    Hamza, Karim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Naturvetenskapsämnenas didaktik.
    Describing and Analyzing Learning in Action: An Empirical Study of the Importance of Misconceptions in Learning Science2008In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 92, no 1, p. 141-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although misconceptions in science have been established in interview studies, their role during the learning process is poorly examined. In this paper we use results from a classroom study to analyze to what extent nonscientific ideas in electrochemistry that students report in interviews enter into their learning in a more authentic setting. We audio recorded talk between eight pairs of Swedish upper secondary students during a practical on electrochemical cells. Learning was operationalized on a discursive level as a description of what students do and say when taking part in an activity. This enabled an analysis of how encounters with misconceptions influenced the development of students’ reasoning, compared to other encounters during the learning experience. Misconceptions did not constrain the development of students’ reasoning. Rather, their reasoning developed in response to the contingencies of the specific situation. When misconceptions were encountered, they appeared as alternatives and questions not actively defended. Sometimes, encounters with these misconceptions were generative of the students’ reasoning. The results indicate that demonstrating misconceptions in interviews is not enough to assume that they interfere with learning in other contexts. Educational implications and future lines of research based on these findings and on the methodology applied are discussed.

  • 26.
    Hamza, Karim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    How do misconceptions of electrochemistry enter into students’ reasoning during a practical task?2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Misconceptions are frequently treated as the chief problem to be overcome in science instruction. In this study we examine to what extent misconceptions of electrochemistry identified in interviews enter into students’ reasoning during a practical on electrochemical cells. We recorded talk in eight pairs of upper secondary students, using a practical epistemology analysis to investigate how their reasoning developed. Students established relations connecting to known misconceptions on rather few occasions. In those instances, their reasoning showed a tentative character, consisting of possibilities and questions rather than of conceptions. In none of these cases did relations touching upon misconceptions constrain how they filled central gaps. On the contrary, they contributed to the students reasoning going in the right direction in some instances. We conclude than when studied in action, the role of common misconceptions can be radically different from that assumed by identifying them in interviews or written surveys. Hence, only when studied within an activity can their significance for the learning of a science content be evaluated correctly.

  • 27.
    Hamza, Karim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    How do misconceptions of electrochemistry identified in interviews enter into students’ reasoning in a more authentic setting?2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite repeated demonstration of students’ nonscientific ideas, the central import for learning ascribed to such misconceptions has been questioned in the literature. In this study, we investigate what role encounters with misconceptions of electrochemistry identified in interviews play for the development of students’ reasoning in an authentic school setting. We audio-recorded talk between eight pairs of upper secondary students during a practical on electrochemistry. To study the role of misconceptions during the learning process, we used an approach that operationalizes learning on a discursive level as a description of what students do and say as part of an activity. We analyzed how encounters with known misconceptions entered into the students’ reasoning, and how these encounters influenced the directions students’ reasoning took. None of the encounters with known misconceptions constrained students’ reasoning or made it go in unwanted directions. In some cases, encountering the misconception worked as a resource for students’ reasoning. Furthermore, the misconceptions appeared as tentative alternatives or as questions rather than being actively maintained and defended. The results indicate that misconceptions recorded in interviews may have different roles in other settings. This may have consequences for how we interpret difficulties in learning science in authentic learning situations.

  • 28.
    Hamza, Karim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Hur lär sig elever naturvetenskap?2008In: Resultatdialog 2008: forskning inom utbildningsvetenskap, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2008, p. 120-124Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Hamza, Karim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Reasoning about electrochemical cells in a concept mapping activity and in the school laboratory2008In: Concept mapping: Connecting educators / [ed] A. J. Cañas, P. Reiska, M. Åhlberg & J. D. Novak, Helsinki-Tallinn, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we study students’ actions in the classroom as a matter of learning to participate in situated practices. We investigate how learning is constituted in two classroom activities commonly regarded as directing students towards manipulating either concrete material or scientific ideas. We audio-recorded pairs of students as they engaged in a common reasoning task about electrochemical cells, either as part of constructing a concept map or working with a real electrochemical cell. In both settings students needed to learn the rules, norms and techniques of the practice as part of their reasoning. This included techniques for attaining an acceptable concept map, or for how to make correct and relevant measures of current and voltage in the electrochemical cell. Students also learned norms for including terms in the concept map, or for distinguishing and naming particulars of the electrochemical cell. Our results show that similarities and differences between two classroom settings can be specified in new ways by studying them as situated practices. How science is taught in the classroom may not primarily be framed as questions about the effectiveness of different methods, but of what students need to learn in order to act competently in different relevant practices.

  • 30.
    Hamza, Karim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Supporting students’ progression in science: Continuity between the particular, the contingent, and the general2013In: Science Education, ISSN 0036-8326, E-ISSN 1098-237X, Vol. 97, no 1, p. 113-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we analyze the relation between particular, contingent, and general aspects of a school science activity and show how they are intertwined in nontrivial ways as students give explanations for how a real galvanic cell works during conversations with a researcher. The conversations were examined by using practical epistemology analysis, which made it possible to follow students’ meaning making in detail. The analysis revealed interactions between generic explanations of electrochemistry and the distinctions and correlations that were connected to particulars and contingencies of the galvanic cell. Consequences of these interactions amounted to becoming reminded of knowledge one had come across before, being able to connect distinctions of particular features of the cell to generalized chemical explanations, and realizing which aspects may be excluded from the account. The results indicate that learning in science needs to be approached more as a contingent process than as something that progresses along one particular dimension. They show how students appropriate the sociocultural tools of science and how they situate what they learn in both the particular features of the activity and in the relevant science. Hence, there is a need for more inclusive accounts of how students progress toward increased competency in science.

  • 31. Ingerman, Åke
    et al.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Towards a teachers’ professional discipline: Shared responsibility for didactic models in research and practice2015In: Transformative Teacher Research: Theory and Practice for the C21st / [ed] Pamela Burnard, Britt-Marie Apelgren, Nese Cabaroglu, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 2015, p. 167-179Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Jakobson, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lundegård, IannStockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.Wickman, Per-OlofStockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lärande i handling: en pragmatisk didaktik2014Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Jakobson, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Aesthetic distinction in elementary school science2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of aesthetic experiences was examined in elementary school in a vein inspired by Dewey and the later Wittgenstein. The results show that aesthetic, normative and cognitive aspects of learning science are intimately related, and that aesthetic experiences are moments of expectations and consummation. In such instances aesthetics is not only an expression of joy, but also something that is integrated with communicating desirable ways of proceeding, and learning new relationships of what carries forward both from the individual's perspective and in communicating science. Aesthetic language is used by teachers and children in establishing norms of action, in talking about which objects, events and actions that should be included and excluded. They are also intimately connected to the continuity of experience. Aesthetic relations make meaningful connections to the earlier experiences of the children and so in a wider sense connect what happens in science education to their understanding of science and their will to participate in science class.

  • 34.
    Jakobson, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Art in science class vs science in art class: A study in elementary school2008In: Education & Didactique, ISSN 2111-4838, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 141-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine how observations and art activities mediate what elementary school children learn in science. We compare results from six different settings in which the children were involved in observing and depicting fish with texts and illustrations using various resources. In three of the settings the aim was scientific, and in the remaining three artistic. The data has been analysed in the light of pragmatist theories and socio-cultural perspectives (a practical epistemology analysis). The results show that different resources afforded the children to observe certain qualities and disregard others. In both science and art classes the children learned about aesthetics, which involved moral considerations.

  • 35.
    Jakobson, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Art in science class vs. science in art class: A study in elementary school2008In: Education & Didactique 978-2-7535-0790-6, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 141-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine how observations and art activities mediate what elementary school children learn in science. We compare results from six different settings in which the children were involved in observing and depicting fish with texts and illustrations using various resources. In three of the settings the aim was scientific, and in the remaining three artistic. The data has been analysed in the light of pragmatist theories and socio-cultural perspectives (a practical epistemology analysis). The results show that different resources afforded the children to observe certain qualities and disregard others. In both the science and art classes the children learned about aesthetics, which involved moral considerations.

  • 36.
    Jakobson, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Children's spontaneous metaphors in elementary school science2015In: Multilingual, multimodal, and multicultural factors in science education, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we examine the role elementary school children's spontaneous metaphors play in learning science. The data consists of audi-recordings of about 25 h from five different schools. The material is ananlysed by using practical epistemology analysis and by Dewey's ideas on the continuity and transformation of experience. The results show the rich and varied meanings that the children put into their spontaneous metaphors. Their metaphors deal with facts as well as norms and aesthetics in relation to science content taught. They influence learning both through what is made salient, as well as through their relations to the children's possibilities of proceeding with their undertakings. Often one and the same metaphor encompassed all these cognivitve, aesthetic and normative aspects at the same time. It is discussed how this rich meaning can be cultured in productive way, and how the children's spontaneous metaphors, with all their relations, can be used to enhance conceptual learning. Through their connection with various experiences of the children, it is also shown how children's spontaneous metaphors have the potential to enliven and humanise the subject.

  • 37.
    Jakobson, Britt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    What difference does art make in science?: A comparative study of meaning-making at elementary school2015In: Interchange, ISSN 0826-4805, E-ISSN 1573-1790, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 323-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Here we examine the role art activities play in aesthetic experience and learning of science. We compare recordings of two sequential occurences in an elementary school class. the purpose of the first sequence was scientific and involved the children observing leaves with magnifiers. The second sequence had an artistic purpose, where the children made pictures of leaves by rubbing them with crayons. The material was analyzed by means of practical epistemology analysis, Deewey's philosophy of aesthetics and socio-cultural approaches using the concept of mediation. The results show that what was mediated in the two sequences differed; the mediating artefacts used thereby having an effect on learning. The children also learned how to take part in the activities aesthetically. What the results mean for the use of artistic activities in science education is discussed. 

     

  • 38.
    Johansson, Annie-Maj
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    A pragmatist understanding of learning progression2011In: Beyond fragmentation: didactics, learning and teaching in Europe / [ed] Brian Hudson, Meinert A. Meyer, Opladen: Budrich, Barbara , 2011, p. 47-59Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 39. Johansson, Annie-Maj
    et al.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Selektiva traditioner i grundskolans tidigare år: Lärares betoningar av kvalitéer i naturvetenskapsundervisningen2013In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 50-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the selective traditions of Swedish primary school teachers in using inquiry-based learning. Material from thirteen interviews where teachers described their own inquiry practice was used to study the selective traditions along with the qualities these traditions emphasized. Four different selective traditions were identified: the fact oriented, the activity oriented, the collaboration oriented and the community oriented traditions. Different qualities were emphasized in the different traditions, for instance regarding whether teaching and inquiry should be difficult, correct, free or fun.

  • 40.
    Johansson, Annie-Maj
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Syften som stöd för minne och lärande i undervisningen2011In: Lärande och minnande som social praktik / [ed] Roger Säljö, Stockholm: Norstedts Förlag, 2011, p. 91-106Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41. Johansson, Annie-Maj
    et al.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    The use of organising purposes in science instruction as a scaffolding mechanism to support progressions: a study of talk in two primary science classrooms2018In: Research in Science & Technological Education, ISSN 0263-5143, E-ISSN 1470-1138, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study examines how different purposes can support teachers in their work with progressions as a part of a teaching sequences in science in primary school.

    Design/Method: The study was carried out in two classes working with inquiry and the events that took place in the classroom were filmed. In the study, we have chosen to use the technical term proximate purposes for the student-oriented purposes, and ultimate purposes for the scientific purposes. Together, these two types of purposes form the organisational purposes for the classes. Proximate purposes work in such a way that students can use their language and relate to their experiences as ends-in-view. To examine how organising purposes can be used to analyse progressions, we discuss examples from two different lessons.

    Result: The study shows the importance of proximate purposes working as ends-in-view and also demonstrates how the teacher and students may create continuity in teaching to enable progression as a part of a teaching sequence.

    Conclusions: To create continuity, it was essential that the teacher scaffolded the students in ways which allowed the students to explicitly differentiate between what was relevant or not, about the proximate purposes in relation to the ultimate purpose.

  • 42.
    Johansson, Annie-Maj
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Using organizing purposes to support learning progressions: a study of talk in primary science classroomsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how different purposes can support teachers in their work with learning progressions in science in primary school. In the study, we have chosen to use the technical term, proximate purposes, for the student-oriented purposes, and ultimate purposes for the scientific purposes. Together, these two types of purposes form the organizational purposes for the classes. Proximate purposes that work in such a way that students can use their language and make relations to their experiences are described by Dewey as ends-in-view. To examine how organizing purposes can be used to analyse progression, we discuss examples from three different lessons. The study shows the importance of proximate purposes working as ends-in-view and also demonstrates how the teacher and students create continuity in teaching to enable progression.

  • 43. Johansson, Annie-Maj
    et al.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Using organizing purposes to support teacher practice2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Starting from John Dewey’s principle of continuity and his notions of inquiry (or “empirical method”) and end-in-view we have developed a model of organizing purposes to support teacher practice. This model can be used by teachers to plan, carry out and assess transactions with students and material conditions in relation to purposes. Organizing purposes are of two kinds, namely proximate and ultimate purposes. Proximate purposes are the initial more student-centered purposes, whereas the ultimate purposes are those that students eventually will embrace as a result of the needs to deal with the inquires centered around the proximate purposes. Proximate purposes are evaluated and assessed through a number of criteria that help teachers to see how these purposes give students ends-in-view, and how they are made continuous with the ultimate purposes of a unit. In line with Dewey’s notion of inquiry progression is here understood as the transformation of participation in one activity with proximate purposes into the participation in a new one with ultimate purposes. We discuss how the notion of organizing purposes has been developed by teachers to further their teaching and how it compares to the more essentialist notion of peripheral participation.

  • 44.
    Johansson, Annie-Maj
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Vad ska elever lära sig angående naturvetenskaplig verksamhet?: En analys av svenska läroplaner för grundskolan under 50 år2012In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 8, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to contribute to an understanding of which changes related to scientific inquiry have been made historically in curriculum documents.  A comparative analysis is made of five Swedish national curricula– Lgr 62, Lgr 69, Lgr 80, Lpo 94 and Lgr 11 – during the last 50 years regarding what compulsory school students (school years 1–9) should learn about scientific inquiry. It focuses 1) what students should learn about carrying out scientific inquiries, and 2) what students should learn about the nature of science. All of the curricula examined have aims concerning scientific inquiry. The results show that during the period there have been many shifts in emphasis and changes of aims, for example from learning an inductive method to a more deductive one, and from an emphasis on carrying out investigations to an emphasis on more conceptual understanding of scientific investigations. Because teaching traditions tend to conserve aspects of earlier curricula, it is discussed how the results can help teachers, teacher students and curriculum developers to better see the consequences of the changes for teaching and learning.

  • 45.
    Kelly, Gregory J.
    et al.
    Penn State University.
    McDonald, Scott
    Penn State University.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Science learning and epistemology2012In: Second International Handbook of Science Education / [ed] Fraser, Barry J.; Tobin, Kenneth; McRobbie, Campbell J. (Eds.), Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer, 2012, p. 281-292-Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Kindenberg, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Dags för didaktiken att bli egen vetenskap2018In: Pedagogiska Magasinet, ISSN 1401-3320, no 2, p. 14-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Lager-Nyqvist, Lotta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lundegård, Iann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lederman, Judith S.
    Department of Mathematics and Science Education at the College of Science and Letters at Illinois Institute of Technology , USA.
    Lederman, Norman G.
    Vad lär sig och minns elever om att göra naturvetenskapliga undersökningar? Att bedöma begreppsligt vetande och praktiskt kunnande.2011In: Lärande och minnande som social praktik / [ed] Roger Säljö, Stockholm: Norstedts Förlag, 2011, p. 106-125Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Lederman, Judith S.
    et al.
    Illinois Institute of Technology.
    Lederman, Norman G.
    Illinois Institute of Technology.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lager-Nyqvist, Lotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    An international, systematic investigation of the relative effects of inquiry and direct instruction2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Lederman, Norman G.
    et al.
    Illinois Institute of Technology.
    Lederman, Judith S.
    Illinois Institute of Technology.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    An international, systematic investigation of the Relative effects of inquiry and direct instruction2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Lederman, Norman G.
    et al.
    Illinois Institute of Technology.
    Lederman, Judith S.
    Illinois Institute of Technology.
    Wickman, Per-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Lager-Nyqvist, Lotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    An international, systematic investigation of the relative effects of inquiry and direct instruction2007Conference paper (Refereed)
123 1 - 50 of 106
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf