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  • 1.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Barockens sena ankomst till Vasastan: Gustav Vasa kyrka2016In: Kyrkornas hemligheter: Stockholm, Stockholm: Medströms Bokförlag, 2016Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    By the Tomb of Genesius2012In: Performativity and Performance in Baroque Rome, Ashgate , 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    Den fängslade furstinnan: Katarina Jagellonicas gravkor i Uppsala domkyrka2013In: Kyrkornas hemligheter / [ed] Ann Catherine Bonnier, Ingrid Sjöström, Stockholm: Medström , 2013, p. 130-131Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    En samlingsplats för dygder: Det Kaggska gravkoret i Floda kyrka2013In: Kyrkornas hemligheter, Stockholm: Medström , 2013, p. 163-165Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    Hela familjen tillsammans: Familjen Körners epitafium i Västerås domkyrka2013In: Kyrkornas hemligheter / [ed] Ann Catherine Bonnier, Ingrid Sjöström, Stockholm: Medström , 2013, p. 132-133Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of the History of Art.
    Holländsk guldålder: Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, 22 september-8 januari 20062006In: Konsthistorisk tidskrift, Vol. 74, no 4, p. 269-276Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    Judith Walker Mann, Babette Bohn, and Carol Plazzotta, eds. Federico Barocci: Renaissance Master of Color and Line2013In: Renaissance quarterly, ISSN 0034-4338, E-ISSN 1935-0236, Vol. 66, no 4, p. 1370-1372Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    Kraftmätning och känsloretorik: Altaruppsatsen i Gustav Vasa kyrka2013In: Kyrkornas hemligheter / [ed] Ann Catherine Bonnier, Ingrid Sjöström, Stockholm: Medström , 2013, p. 158-159Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    Luis Milan och den orfiska gemenskapen2014In: Kungl. Vitterhets historie och antikvitets akademiens årsbok, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2014, p. 177-194Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    On the Reception of Michelangelo in Sweden from 1850 to 19502013In: Konsten och det nationella: Essäer om konsthistoria i Europa 1850-1950 / [ed] Martin Olin, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademien, 2013, p. 61-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    Performativa aspekter på Michelangelos gravmonument över Juiius II2010In: Det åskådliga och det bottenlösa: Tankar kring konst och humaniora tillägnade Margaretha Rossholm Lagerlöf, Stockholm: Konstvetenskapliga institutionen , 2010, p. 226-234Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    Riddarens vapen och rustning: Carl Gustaf Wrangels begravningsvapen i Skoklosters kyrka2013In: Kyrkornas hemligheter, Stockholm: Medström , 2013, p. 166-167Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Siting Federico Barocci and the Renaissance Aesthetic2016Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Focusing on what he calls 'the performative gaze', the author explores the artistic world of the Urbino painter Federico Barocci (1535-1612) in the context of Renaissance culture. Through analysis of Barocci's works, Gillgren also sheds new light on Renaissance aesthetic communication generally. The first part of the book discusses the poetics of Early Modern painting, based on contemporary theories of Reception Aesthetics, hermeneutics and phenomenology, but grounded in Renaissance culture itself through numerous examples from Early Modern painting. The author discusses works by such artists as Botticelli, Raphael, Titian, VelA!zquez and Poussin from the point of view of their spectator status. The second part deals specifically with the art of Federico Barocci, showing in detail how his works relate to aspects of the gaze and to their intended spectators. Gillgren's method is unusual in that he takes care to set the images within their original physical contexts (lighting, space, framing materials, angle of viewer approach) as much as possible through careful analysis of early descriptions of now destroyed or modified chapels. The third section of the volume contains a brief catalogue of Barocci's paintings, presented in a chronological order, with a full bibliography and with details about the painting's original locations.

  • 14.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    Siting Federico Barocci and the Renaissance Aesthetic2011Book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Siting Michelangelo: Spectatorship, Site Specificity and Soundscape2017Book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    Siting Michelangelo's Last Judgment in a Multimedia Context: Art, Music and Ceremony in the Sistine Chapel2011In: Konsthistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-3609, E-ISSN 1651-2294, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 65-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Michelangelo's Last Judgment is a site-specific work. The fresco was painted in 1535-1541 for permanent installation in the Sistine chapel and conceived as part of a multimedia spectacle, involving the singing of Costanzo Festa's Miserere (a forerunner to Allegri's better known piece) and the gradual darkening of the chapel the famous tenebrae ceremony. Several of the painting's characteristics can be explained as the result of the artist optimizing his work to function within this very context. The study is based on witness reports of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century, as well as sixteenth-century sources on the art, music and ceremonies of the Sistine chapel. Special consideration is given to the tapestries by Raphael and their relationship to Michelangelo's work.

  • 17.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    The Lure of Aesthetic Criticism: Caravaggio x 2 at Nationalmuseum, Stockholm2010In: Konsthistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-3609, E-ISSN 1651-2294, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 228-231Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of the History of Art.
    The Religious Iconography2006In: In Hoc Signo Vinces: A Presentation of The Swedish State Trophy Collection, Armémuseum , 2006, p. 100-110Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    Una Dolcissima Estasi: Performing The Visitation by Federico Barocci2012In: Performativity and Performance in Baroque Rome / [ed] Mårten Snickare, Peter Gillgren, Ashgate, 2012, p. 157--178Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new interest in the study of early modern ritual, ceremony, formations of personal and collective identities, social roles, and the production of meaning inside and outside the arts have made it possible to talk today about a performative turn in the humanities. In Performativity and Performance in Baroque Rome, scholars from different fields of research explore performative aspects of Baroque culture. With examples from the politics of diplomacy and everyday life, from theatre, music and ritual as well as from architecture, painting and sculpture the contributors demonstrate how broadly the concept of performativity has been adopted within different disciplines.

  • 20.
    Gillgren, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    Vasarenässansen: Konst och identitet i 1500-talets Sverige2009Book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Snickare, Mårten
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    Gillgren, PeterStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Art History.
    Performativity and performance in baroque Rome2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Wåghäll Nivre, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
    Carlstedt, AnnaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.Cullhed, AndersStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.Franzén, CarinGillgren, PeterStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.Lundström, KerstinStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.Sellberg, ErlandStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Allusions and Reflections: Greek and Roman Mythology in Renaissance Europe2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In June 2012, scholars from a number of disciplines and countries gathered in Stockholm to discuss the representation of ancient mythology in Renaissance Europe. This symposium was an opportunity for the participants to cross disciplinary borders and to problematize a well-researched field. The aim was to move beyond a view of mythology as mere propaganda in order to promote an understanding of ancient tales and fables as contemporary means to explain and comprehend the Early Modern world.With the Renaissance, pagan religion ceased to pose a threat to Christianity and its mythologies found a way to coexist with Christian doctrine. Old Greek and Roman tales came to play a crucial role in Renaissance culture, partly because the ancient sources, both literary and artistic, many of them recently uncovered, provided rich material for the writers and artists of the period. Mythology provided a network of allusions and references for contemporary poetry and art, reinforcing the possibilities of allegorical interpretation. Furthermore, it offered moral guidance since deities could easily be materialized into personifications of vices and virtues. All artistic expressions, visual and textual, whether they belonged to a secular or a religious tradition, made use of mythology. This volume exemplifies how Renaissance writers’ and artists’ acquaintance with mythological accounts from Homer to Apuleius was of utmost importance for their creative work, as it was for their readers and those contemporary patrons of art who saw themselves as the living embodiment of some remote ancient deity. By posing new questions and suggesting alternative answers to old ones, the contributors to this volume provide a better and more detailed understanding of the struggles and strategies of recycling, recuperating and transforming ancient mythology during the Renaissance. All chapters here have a common focus on the re-configuration of classical myths in Early Modern Europe, in political, erotic and ceremonial contexts. By returning to the classical world of cosmic strife and harmony, of gods and metamorphoses, Renaissance poets and artists were able to express their aesthetic ideals, personal preoccupations and moral attitudes. Ancient mythology offered them a full set of useful metaphors, which could take on new meanings in a new cultural context.

1 - 22 of 22
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