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  • 1.
    Demina, Irina V.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Maity, Pooja Jha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Nagchowdhury, Anurupa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Ng, Jason L. P.
    van der Graaff, Eric
    Demchenko, Kirill N.
    Roitsch, Thomas
    Mathesius, Ulrike
    Pawlowski, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Accumulation of and Response to Auxins in Roots and Nodules of the Actinorhizal Plant Datisca glomerata Compared to the Model Legume Medicago truncatula2019In: Frontiers in Plant Science, ISSN 1664-462X, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 10, article id 1085Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Actinorhizal nodules are structurally different from legume nodules and show a greater similarity to lateral roots. Because of the important role of auxins in lateral root and nodule formation, auxin profiles were examined in roots and nodules of the actinorhizal species Datisca glomerata and the model legume Medicago truncatula. The auxin response in roots and nodules of both species was analyzed in transgenic root systems expressing a beta-glucuronidase gene under control of the synthetic auxin-responsive promoter DR5. The effects of two different auxin on root development were compared for both species. The auxin present in nodules at the highest levels was phenylacetic acid (PAA). No differences were found between the concentrations of active auxins of roots vs. nodules, while levels of the auxin conjugate indole-3-acetic acid-alanine were increased in nodules compared to roots of both species. Because auxins typically act in concert with cytokinins, cytokinins were also quantified. Concentrations of cis-zeatin and some glycosylated cytokinins were dramatically increased in nodules compared to roots of D. glomerata, but not of M. truncatula. The ratio of active auxins to cytokinins remained similar in nodules compared to roots in both species. The auxin response, as shown by the activation of the DR5 promoter, seemed significantly reduced in nodules compared to roots of both species, suggesting the accumulation of auxins in cell types that do not express the signal transduction pathway leading to DR5 activation. Effects on root development were analyzed for the synthetic auxin naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and PAA, the dominant auxin in nodules. Both auxins had similar effects, except that the sensitivity of roots to PAA was lower than to NAA. However, while the effects of both auxins on primary root growth were similar for both species, effects on root branching were different: both auxins had the classical positive effect on root branching in M. truncatula, but a negative effect in D. glomerata. Such a negative effect of exogenous auxin on root branching has previously been found for a cucurbit that forms lateral root primordia in the meristem of the parental root; however, root branching in D. glomerata does not follow that pattern.

  • 2.
    Morgan, Sherif H.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. University of Kiel, Germany; Cairo University, Egypt.
    Maity, Pooja Jha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Geilfus, Christoph-Martin
    Lindberg, Sylvia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Muehling, Karl Hermann
    Leaf ion homeostasis and plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity in Vicia faba change after extra calcium and potassium supply under salinity2014In: Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), ISSN 0981-9428, E-ISSN 1873-2690, Vol. 82, p. 244-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Salt stress in plants impacts apoplastic ion activities and cytosolic ionic homeostasis. The ameliorating effects exerted by calcium or potassium on compartmentation of ions in leaves under salinity are not fully understood. To clarify how calcium or potassium supply could ameliorate ion homeostasis and ATPase activities under salinity, 5 mM CaSO4 or 10 mM K2SO4 were added with, or without, 100 mM NaCl for 7 d and 21 d to Vicia faba grown in hydroponics. The apoplastic pH was detected with Oregon Green dextran dye in intact second-uppermost leaves by microscopy-based ratio imaging. The cytosolic Ca2+, Na+, K+ activities and pH were detected in protoplasts loaded with the acetoxy methyl-esters of Fura-2, SBFI, PBFI and BCECF, respectively, using epi-fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, total Ca2+, Na+, K+ concentrations and growth parameters were investigated. The ATPase hydrolyzing activity increased with time, but decreased after long salinity treatment. The activity largely increased in calcium-treated plants, but was depressed in potassium-treated plants after 7 d. The calcium supply increased Vmax, and the ATPase activity increased with salinity in a non-competitive way for 7 d and 21 d. The potassium supply instead decreased activity competitively with Na+, after 21 d of salinity, with different effects on Km and Vmax. The confirmed higher ATPase activity was related with apoplast acidification, cytosol alkalinization and low cytosolic [Na+], and thus, might be an explanation why extra calcium improved shoot and leaf growth.

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