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  • 1. Björck, Niclas
    et al.
    Larsson, Fredrik
    Molnar, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Olson, Carina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Djur och växter2008In: Mellan hav och skog: Högmossen, en stenåldersmiljö vid en skimrande strand i norra Uppland, 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Leden, Ido
    et al.
    Section of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Central Hospital, Kristianstad, Sweden..
    Svensson, Björn
    Section of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Helsingborg´s lasarett, Helsingborg, Sweden..
    Götherström, Anders
    Department of Evolutionary Biology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Daskalaki, Evangelia
    Department of Evolutionary Biology, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Arcini, Caroline
    Riksantikvarieämbetet, U.V. Syd, Lund, Sweden..
    Drenzel, Leena
    National Historical Museum (SMHS), Department of Cultural History and Collections, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hårding, Barbro
    County Administrative Board, Länsstyrelsen Gävleborg, Gävle, Sweden..
    Molnar, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Bennike, Pia
    Saxo Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Criteria for the Paleopathological Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA):A Proposal for an Updating2009In: Paleopathology Newsletter, ISSN 01484737, no 145, p. 22-24Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Malmström, Helena
    et al.
    Department of Evolutionary Biology, Uppsala University, SE-11863 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gilbert, M. Thomas P.
    Centre for GeoGenetics, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Thomas, Mark G.
    Research Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, and the AHRC Centre for the Evolution of Cultural Diversity, University College London, Gower Street,London WC1E 6BT, UK.
    Brandström, Mikael
    Department of Forest Mycology and Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-10691 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Molnar, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Andersen, Pernille K.
    Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of Aarhus, PO Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele, Denmark.
    Bendixen, Christian
    Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of Aarhus, PO Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele, Denmark.
    Holmlund, Gunilla
    National Board of Forensic Medicine, Department of Forensic Genetics and Forensic Toxicology, SE-58758 Linköping, Sweden.
    Götherström, Anders
    Department of Evolutionary Biology, Uppsala University, SE-11863 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Willerslev, Eske
    Centre for GeoGenetics, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ancient DNA Reveals Lack of Continuitybetween Neolithic Hunter-Gatherersand Contemporary Scandinavians2009In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 19, no 20, p. 1758-1762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The driving force behind the transition from a foraging to

    a farming lifestyle in prehistoric Europe (Neolithization)

    has been debated for more than a century [1–3]. Of particular

    interest is whether population replacement or cultural

    exchange was responsible [3–5]. Scandinavia holds a unique

    place in this debate, for it maintained one of the last major

    hunter-gatherer complexes in Neolithic Europe, the Pitted

    Ware culture [6]. Intriguingly, these late hunter-gatherers

    existed in parallel to early farmers for more than a millennium

    before they vanished some 4,000 years ago [7, 8]. The prolonged

    coexistence of the two cultures in Scandinavia has

    been cited as an argument against population replacement

    between the Mesolithic and the present [7, 8]. Through analysis

    of DNA extracted from ancient Scandinavian human

    remains, we show that people of the Pitted Ware culture

    were not the direct ancestors of modern Scandinavians

    (including the Saami people of northern Scandinavia) but

    are more closely related to contemporary populations of

    the eastern Baltic region. Our findings support hypotheses

    arising from archaeological analyses that propose

    a Neolithic or post-Neolithic population replacement in

    Scandinavia [7]. Furthermore, our data are consistent with

    the view that the eastern Baltic represents a genetic refugia

    for some of the European hunter-gatherer populations.

  • 4.
    Malmström, Helena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Molnar, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Holmlund, Gunilla
    rättsmedicinalverket.
    Jakobsson, mattias
    Uppsala universitet.
    Götherström, Anders
    Uppsala universitet.
    High frequency of lactose intolerance in a prehistoric hunter-gatherer population in northern Europe2010In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 10, p. 89-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Genes and culture are believed to interact, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence for the process. One candidate example that has been put forward is lactase persistence in adulthood, i.e. the ability to continue digesting the milk sugar lactose after childhood, facilitating the consumption of raw milk. This genetic trait is believed to have evolved within a short time period and to be related with the emergence of sedentary agriculture.

    Results: Here we investigate the frequency of an allele (-13910*T) associated with lactase persistence in a Neolithic Scandinavian population. From the 14 individuals originally examined, 10 yielded reliable results. We find that the T allele frequency was very low (5%) in this Middle Neolithic hunter-gatherer population, and that the frequency is dramatically different from the extant Swedish population (74%).

    Conclusions: We conclude that this difference in frequency could not have arisen by genetic drift and is either due to selection or, more likely, replacement of hunter-gatherer populations by sedentary agriculturalists.

  • 5.
    Molnar, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Dental Wear and Oral Pathology: Possible Evidence and Consequences of Habitual Use of Teeth in a Swedish Neolithic Sample2008In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, ISSN 0002-9483, E-ISSN 1096-8644, Vol. 136, no 4, p. 423-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atypical wear and oral lesions were studied in the dental remains from the Middle Neolithic Pitted Ware Culture site Ajvide on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. Teeth (n = 764) from 17 males and 11 females were examined microscopically to document unusual wear, assess wear patterns and oral lesions as evidence of habitual behavior, and determine their effect on the oral health of this population. Five atypical wear types were observed: occlusal facets, occlusal excessive load, labial vertical striae, labial horizontal striae, and interproximal striae. Three oral lesions were recorded: chipping, periapical lesions, and dental tilting. Results indicate that teeth were used in a habitual manner at Ajvide, based on the morphology and regularity of the patterns of atypical wear. Differences were observed between the sexes, indicating gender-related differences in the habitual use of teeth. Some wear categories showed a significant correlation with age, signifying increased or accumulated wear with age. Statistically significant positive correlations were found in the molars between occlusal excessive load wear and periapical lesions as well as tilting. Other apparent links were also observed between chipping and vertical striae as well as excessive load, although these were not significant. This suggests a relationship between dental wear and dental pathologies at this site, suggesting that habitual use of teeth indirectly affected the general oral health at the site. Wear patterns, furthermore, seem to mirror both frequent activities as well as single events.

  • 6.
    Molnar, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Extramasticatory dental wear reflecting habitual behavior and health in past populations2011In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 681-689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In skeletal remains, teeth are valuable sources of information regarding age, diet, and health. Dental wear is especially helpful in reconstructions of dietary patterns in populations of varying subsistence. In past societies, teeth have also been used as a third hand or as a tool. The present article examines this type of dental wear and traits attributed to habitual behavior during prehistoric and historic times. Terminology and classification of habitual dental wear are described mainly by appearance, for instance, notching, grooving, cuts, scrapes, and polished surfaces, and their characteristics are illuminated by different case studies. Secondary health effects caused by the extramasticatory use of teeth, such as periapical lesions, tilting, skeletal changes at the temporomandibular joint, chipping, and antemortem tooth loss are also examined. During the examination of extramasticatory dental wear, information should be recorded on morphology, size, frequency, intensity, and location within the dental arch, as well as descriptions and detailed photographic documentation. The advantage of using a low-to medium-resolution microscope in all dental examination is emphasized. By categorizing the wear marks, characteristics are emphasized rather than an exact causing agent. In this way, tentative analogies for the origin of different extramasticatory wear, and consequently for human behavior in the past, can be avoided.

  • 7.
    Molnar, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Patterns of Physical Activity and Material Culture on Gotland, Sweden During the Middle Neolithic2010In: International journal of osteoarchaeology, ISSN 1047-482X, E-ISSN 1099-1212, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Linking MSM (Musculoskeletal Stress Markers) to specific activities is difficult. This problem is explored by combining and comparing patterns of MSM and material culture. Sex- and age-related patterns for MSM and grave goods distributions are analysed and compared from five Pitted Ware (c. 3400–2300 BC) sites on Gotland, Sweden. Possible links between MSM patterns, burial objects, faunal remains and subsistence are explored for a better understanding of some of the irregularities surrounding the Pitted Ware culture hunter-gatherer complex on Gotland. Fifty-two muscle and ligament attachments on seven skeletal elements were scored on adult skeletal remains (n = 126) from the five Middle Neolithic Pitted Ware sites at Ajvide, Västerbjers, Visby, Ire and Fridtorp. Noteworthy differences were observed in MSM mean scores between the sexes as well as significantly increased scores with increased age. Distributions for ten selected grave goods categories were also examined for the adult individuals as well as for 50 subadult individuals. The grave goods frequencies showed the opposite pattern from that of MSM: young individuals had higher frequencies of the selected grave goods than the old, and females generally more than males. Burial find distributions also differ at the five sites, as well as faunal refuse proportions, while isotopic data indicate homogeneous subsistence all over the island. Circumstances surrounding the faunal remains in graves and surrounding cultural layers indicate site-specific utilisation, but also ritual handling of animals. An image of common identity on the island and membership of the local community is visible in the material culture. In addition, individual differences are apparent through MSM patterns and grave goods, but not in direct correlation to activities implied by the artefacts in the grave.

  • 8.
    Molnar, Petra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Ahlström, Torbjörn P.
    Leden, Ido
    Osteoarthritis and Activity-An Analysis of the Relationship Between Eburnation, Musculoskeletal Stress Markers (MSM) and Age in Two Neolithic Hunter-Gatherer Populations from Gotland, Sweden2011In: International journal of osteoarchaeology, ISSN 1047-482X, E-ISSN 1099-1212, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 283-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The occurrence of osteoarthritis (OA) as an indicator of physical activity was explored in two Middle Neolithic samples from Gotland (c. 3400-2300 BC) in the Baltic Sea: Ajvide (n = 46) and Vasterbjers (n = 32). The difficulty in diagnosing OA is recognised and only eburnation was used as a definite criterion for OA. The relationship between eburnation lesions and Musculoskeletal Stress Markers (MSM) was investigated particularly in relation to age, but also with reference to patterns of sex, body side and site. Results show that increasing prevalence of eburnation as well as increased MSM scores was highly correlated with age. In the combined sample, females exhibited higher frequencies of eburnation, while total MSM mean scores were higher in males. Significantly higher MSM mean scores were also found in those individuals with eburnation lesions. Vasterbjers exhibited higher frequencies of eburnation as well as higher mean MSM scores, which in part may be explained by the difference in age distribution at the two sites. However, the differences in both eburnation and MSM patterns between the sexes, and between age groups as well as between the two sites indicate that other factors also have to be considered. These may include genetic predisposition and possibly activity, although, a direct link (other than age) between eburnation and MSM was difficult to discern.

  • 9.
    Molnar, Petra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Skeletal Evidence of Health, Disease and Activity in two Swedish PopulationsIn: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, ISSN 0002-9483Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 9 of 9
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