Change search
Refine search result
1 - 42 of 42
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Hendry, Robin Findlay
    et al.
    Univ Durham, Durham , England.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Woody, Andrea I.
    Univ Washington, Seattle, USA.
    Handbook of the Philosophy of Science Volume 6 Philosophy of Chemistry INTRODUCTION2012In: Philosophy of Chemistry, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2012, p. 3-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    A Critique of the Kripke/Putnam Conception of Water2008In: Stuff: The Nature of Chemical Substances, Könighausen & Neumann, Würzburg , 2008, p. 93-106Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    A Mereological Interpretation of the Phase Rule2010In: Philosophy of science (East Lansing), ISSN 0031-8248, E-ISSN 1539-767X, Vol. 77, no 5, p. 900-910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gibbs's phase rule treats mixtures by relating the number of independent variables governing their state to the numbers of phases and independent substances. For the case of a single substance, it provides a criterion of purity. But where more substances are involved, the notion of independent substance is less readily understood. Textbook writers sometimes use algebraic terminology in ways that are suggestive but cannot be taken as literally accurate. I suggest that a mereological interpretation applies to these cases, as it captures more concisely the insights underlying the use of algebraic terminology and illuminates the general notion of substance.

  • 4.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    A Revisionist History of Atomism2010In: Metascience, Vol. 19, p. 349-371Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    An Aristotelian Theory of Chemical Substance2009In: Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy, ISSN 1617-3473, Vol. 12, p. 149-164Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Chemistry2017In: Handbook of Mereology / [ed] Hans Burkhardt, Johanna Seibt, Guido Imaguire, Stamatios Gerogiorgakis, München: Philosophia Verlag GmbH, 2017, p. 141-147Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Commentary on the Principles of Thermodynamics by Pierre Duhem2011Book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Compounds and Mixtures2012In: Philosophy of chemistry / [ed] Andrea I. Woody, Robin Findlay Hendry, Paul Needham, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2012, Vol. 6, p. 271-290Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Determining Sameness of Substance2017In: British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, ISSN 0007-0882, E-ISSN 1464-3537, Vol. 68, no 4, p. 953-979Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea that the extension of a chemical substance is fixed by determining what stands in the relation of being the same substance to a paradigm sample plays a substantial role in chemistry, and procedures of identification which don’t make direct use of the method can be traced back to ones that do. But paradigm samples are not typically selected by ostension, as in Putnam’s version of this procedure. The relevance of ostension is questioned after a discussion of the establishment of paradigm specimens in the analysis of some contents of crude oil and an examination of the general features of the same substance relation which takes into account the temporal dependency and the consequent role of characteristic features of substances.

  • 10.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Duhem’s Moderate Realism2011In: Metascience, ISSN 0815-0796 (Print), Vol. 20, p. 7-12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Elements2017In: Handbook of Mereology / [ed] Hans Burkhardt, Johanna Seibt, Guido Imaguire, Stamatios Gerogiorgakis, München: Philosophia Verlag GmbH, 2017, p. 197-200Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Hydrogen Bonding: Homing in on a Tricky Chemical Concept2013In: Studies in history and philosophy of science, ISSN 0039-3681, E-ISSN 1879-2510, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 51-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The history of the hydrogen bond provides a good example of the of an important chemical concept. It illustrates the interplay between empirical and theoretical approaches to the problem of delimiting what has proved to be quite an elusive notion, with chemists whittling away at the particular sorts of case with a view to obtaining a precise, unitary concept. Even though there is a return to a more theoretically inspired notion in more recent research, empirical characterisations remain a feature of the report of a Task Group recently set up by the IUPAC to reconsider the definition of the hydrogen bond, and this situation-by no means unusual for chemical concepts and principles-is unlikely to change in the foreseeable future. These developments are reviewed in this paper, which includes an extended discussion of the enormous significance hydrogen bonding has for the philosopher's standard example of a "natural kind", water. There is little to suggest a reduction to what philosophers of physics are pleased to call fundamental principles, and the details raise further questions about what essentialists could possibly have in mind when talking about the microscopic essence of water.

  • 13.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Is Water a Mixture?: Bridging the Distinction Between Physical and Chemical Properties2008In: Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, Vol. 39, p. 66-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two inter-linked theses are defended in this paper. One is the Duhemian theme that a rigid distinction between physical and chemical properties cannot be upheld. Duhem maintained this view not because the latter are reducible to the former, but because if physics is to remain consistent with chemistry it must prove possible to expand it to accommodate new features, and a rigid distinction would be a barrier to this process. The second theme is that naturally occurring isotopic variants of water are in fact distinct substances, and naturally occurring samples of water are mixtures of these substances. For most practical purposes it is convenient to treat protium oxide, deuterium oxide, and so on, as the same chemical substance, but to insist on this as a matter of principle would stand in conflict with the first thesis.

  • 14.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Kvotskalor för icke-extensiva storheter2017In: Från Skaradjäkne till Uppsalaprofessor: festskrift till Lars-Göran Johansson i samband med hans pensionering / [ed] George Masterton, Keizo Matsubara and Kim Solin, Uppsala: Department of Philosophy, Uppsala University , 2017, p. 79-105Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Macroscopic Metaphysics: Middle-Sized Objects and Longish Processes2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book is about our ordinary concept of matter in the form of enduring continuants and the processes in which they are involved in the macroscopic realm. It emphasises what science rather than philosophical intuition tells us about the world, and chemistry rather than the physics that is more usually encountered in philosophical discussions. The central chapters dealing with the nature of matter pursue key steps in the historical development of scientific conceptions of chemical substance.

    Like many contemporary discussions of material objects, it relies heavily on mereology. The classical principles are applied to the mereological structure of regions of space, intervals of time, processes and quantities of matter. Quantities of matter, which don’t gain or lose parts over time, are distinguished from individuals, which are typically constituted of different quantities of matter at different times. The proper treatment of the temporal aspect of the features of material objects is a central issue in this book, which is addressed by investigating the conditions governing the application of predicates relating time and other entities. Of particular interest here are relations between quantities of matter and times expressing substance kind, phase and mixture. Modal aspects of these features are taken up in the final chapter.

  • 16.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Making theorem-proving in modal logic easy2009In: Logic, ethics and all that jazz: essays in honour of Jordan Howard Sobel / [ed] Lars-Göran Johansson, Jan Österberg, Rysiek Sliwinski, Uppsala: Department of Philosophy, Uppsala University , 2009, p. 187-202Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Mereological Structure in Chemical Substances and Their Transformations: An Analytic Perspective on the Historical Development of These Concepts2013In: The Philosophy of Chemistry: Practices, Methodologies, and Concepts / [ed] Jean-Pierre Llored, Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013, p. 527-557Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Microessentialism: What is the Argument?2011In: Noûs, ISSN 0029-4624, E-ISSN 1468-0068, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    According to microessentialism, it is necessary to resort to microstructure in order to adequately characterise chemical substances such as water. But the thesis has never been properly supported by argument. Kripke and Putnam, who originally proposed the thesis, suggest that a so-called stereotypical characterisation is not possible, whereas one in terms of microstructure is. However, the sketchy outlines given of stereotypical descriptions hardly support the impossibility claim. On the other hand, what naturally stands in contrast to microscopic description is description in macroscopic terms, and macroscopic characterisations of water are certainly possible. This suffices to counter the claim that microdescriptions are necessary. Whether it counters the impossibility claim depends on whether all macroscopic descriptions are stereotypical (stereotypical descriptions presumably being macroscopic). In so far as systematic import of “stereotypical” can be determined, it would seem not. But some macroscopic characterisations have definite affinity with everyday knowledge, which presumably stands in conflict with the spirit of the impossibility claim. Since what is characterised are properties expressed by predicates like “is water”, the necessity of identity has no bearing here, and matters of interpretation pose problems for claims to the effect that science fixes the extension of “water” as ordinarily understood.

  • 19.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Modality, Mereology and Substance2012In: Philosophy of chemistry / [ed] Andrea I. Woody, Robin Findlay Hendry, Paul Needham, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2012, Vol. 6, p. 231-254Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Nagel’s Analysis of Reduction: Comments in Defence as Well as Critique2010In: Studies in history and philosophy of modern physics, ISSN 1355-2198, E-ISSN 1879-2502, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 163-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite all the criticism showered on Nagel's classic account of reduction, it meets a fundamental desideratum in an analysis of reduction that is difficult to question, namely of providing for a proper identification of the reducing theory. This is not clearly accommodated in radically different accounts. However, the same feature leads me to question Nagel's claim that the reducing theory can be separated from the putative bridge laws, and thus to question his notion of heterogeneous reduction. A further corollary to the requirement that all the necessary conditions be incorporated in an adequate formulation of the putative reducing theory is that the standard example of gas temperature is not reducible to average molecular kinetic energy. As originally conceived, Nagel's conception of reduction takes no account of approximate reasoning and this failure has certainly restricted its applicability, perhaps to the point of making it unrealistic as a model of reduction in science. I suggest approximation can be accommodated by weakening the original requirement of deduction without jeopardizing the fundamental desideratum. Finally, I turn to briefly consider the idea sometimes raised of the ontological reducibility of chemistry.

  • 21.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Natural kind thingamajigs2012In: International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, ISSN 0269-8595, E-ISSN 1469-9281, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 97-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I criticize the treatment of natural kinds as some sort of object, advocated in a recent paper by Alexander Bird. The arguments he gives for regimenting an illustrative statement featuring chemical kinds in his preferred manner are not conclusive, and his criticisms of an alternative strategy involving universally quantified sentences fail. This is important because of the widespread but poorly supported assumption that expressions of natural kinds should be treated as singular referring terms.

  • 22.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Nineteenth-century chemical theory: correction of a misunderstanding2014In: Foundations of Chemistry, ISSN 1386-4238, E-ISSN 1572-8463, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 165-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I reply in this short note to some criticisms that Alan Rocke has recently made in this journal.

  • 23.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    One Substance or More?2015In: Philosophy of Chemistry: Synthesis of a New Discipline / [ed] Eric Scerri, Lee McIntyre, Dordrecht: Springer-Verlag New York, 2015, p. 91-105Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemistry builds on distinctions of substance, which presupposes that matter can be divided into substances and these exemplars compared with others on different occasions to determine whether they are the same substance. Even the notion of a quantity comprising a single substance presupposes the same substance relation, i.e. being a quantity all of whose spatial parts are the same substance. Criteria of purity have been important for isolating substances and investigating their characteristic properties, which can in turn be used for establishing sameness of substance. With the development of chemistry into a theoretical science it became important that such criteria and characteristics should have a systematic theoretical basis. Thermodynamics was, perhaps, the first comprehensive theory to systematically divide the mass of the bodies with which it deals into distinct substances and offer general criteria governing the number of substances present. But the applicability of such macroscopic criteria is restricted to equilibrium conditions on a macroscopic time scale. They can be compared with microscopic conceptions of molecular structure, with which they have been complemented—some would say superseded. Since many substances are not molecular, however, the general formulation of a microscopic sameness of substance criterion remains unclear.

  • 24.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Pierre Duhem (1861-1916)2012In: Philosophy of chemistry / [ed] Andrea I. Woody, Robin Findlay Hendry, Paul Needham, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2012, Vol. 6, p. 113-124Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    After a brief bibliographical sketch, Duhem's professional interests in chemistry are distinguished from his several other interests and related to his general concerns with the development of thermodynamics. His account of chemical formulas is described in sufficient detail to convey why he thought no atomist presuppositions were involved, and some of his reasons for questioning atomism are discussed. The article concludes with a discussion of his understanding of the bearing of ancient alternatives to atomism on the interpretation of the science of his time.

  • 25.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Process and Change: From a Thermodynamic Perspective2013In: British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, ISSN 0007-0882, E-ISSN 1464-3537, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 395-422Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Questioning the Justification of Past Science2013In: International Studies in the Philosophy of Science, ISSN 0269-8595, E-ISSN 1469-9281, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 85-93Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Reduction and Emergence: A Critique of Kim2009In: Philosophical Studies, Vol. 146, p. 93-116Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Resisting Chemical Atomism: Duhem's Argument2008In: Philosophy of Science, Vol. 75, no 4, p. 834-845Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Late 19th century opponents of atomism questioned whether the evidence required any notion of an atom. In this spirit, Duhem developed an account of the import of chemical formulas which is clearly neutral on the atomic question rather than anti-atomistic. The argument is supplemented with specific inadequacies of atomic theories of chemical combination, and considerably strengthened by the theory of chemical combination provided by thermodynamics. Despite possible counter-evidence available at the time, which should have tempered some of Duhem’s concluding remarks, there was no atomic theory of chemical combination, which is wholly a product of the 20th century.

  • 29.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Scientific Realism and Chemistry2017In: The Routledge Handbook on Scientific Realism / [ed] Juha Saatsi, London: Routledge, 2017, p. 345-356Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Substance and Modality2007In: Philosophy of Science, Vol. 73, p. 829-840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Aristotelian distinction between actual and potential presence of a substance in a mixture forms part of a conception of mixture which stands in contrast to atomist and Stoic theories as propounded by the ancients. But the central ideas on which these theories are built needn’t be combined and opposed to one another in precisely the ways envisaged by these ancient theories. This is well-illustrated by Duhem, who maintained the Aristotelian idea that the original ingredients are only potentially, and not actually, present in a mixture, but sided with the Stoics and against Aristotle on the possibility of cooccupancy. I have argued that the Stoic theory can’t dispense with some such notion as the Aristotelian conception of potentiality in allowing the elements to be actually present in a mixture. Here I suggest that some such Aristotelian notion must be at work in a more modern atomic conception of matter if this is to allow elemental substances to be actually present in compounds, which I think is how compounds are usually understood. Analogous issues arise regarding the status of solutions and their components.

  • 31.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Substance and Time2010In: British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, ISSN 0007-0882, E-ISSN 1464-3537, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 485-512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Water is H2O’ is naturally construed as an equivalence. What are the things to which the two predicates ‘is water’ and ‘is H2O’ apply? The equivalence presupposes that substance properties are distinguished from phase properties. A substance like water (H2O) exhibits various phases (solid, liquid, gas) under appropriate conditions, and a given (say liquid) phase may comprise several substances. What general features distinguish substance from phase properties? I tackle these questions on the basis of an interpretation of a theorem of thermodynamics known as Gibbs' phase rule which systematically relates these two kinds of feature of matter. The interpretation develops the idea that the things substance and phase predicates apply to are quantities of matter which sustain mereological relations and operations and exploits these mereological features in distinguishing the two kinds of property. Gibbs' phase rule is a macroscopic principle applicable for macroscopic intervals of time. Bringing intervals of time into the picture calls for a more detailed consideration of the relation between macroscopic equilibria and the corresponding dynamic equilibria at the microlevel and throws into question the simple idea that quantities can always be regarded as collections of molecules. The account provides some insight into how the continuous, macroscopic conception of matter (‘gunk’) is reconciled with the discrete microscopic conception and illuminates the interpretation of substances present in mixtures.

  • 32.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    The Phase Rule and the Notion of Substance2012In: EPSA Philosophy of Science: Amsterdam 2009 / [ed] Henk W. de Regt, Stephan Hartmann, Samir Okasha., Berlin: Springer, 2012, p. 253-262Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemistry is “concerned”, as Benfey (1963, 574) puts it in his opening sentence, “with substances and with their transformations into other substances”. But the central notion of substance has a chequered history which hasn’t clearly led to a single simple unified concept. The general notion can be approached from a microscopic or a macroscopic perspective. The macroscopic perspective reflects, perhaps, the culmination of an older historical tradition, but has by no means been surpassed by the microscopic perspective which has developed since the beginning of the twentieth century.

  • 33.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    The Rise of Quantum Chemistry: Symposium on Kostas Gavroglu and Ana Simões, Neither Physics nor Chemistry2013In: Metascience, ISSN 1467-9981, Vol. 22, p. 533-537Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    The Source of Chemical Bonding2014In: Studies in history and philosophy of science, ISSN 0039-3681, E-ISSN 1879-2510, Vol. 45, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developments in the application of quantum mechanics to the understanding of the chemical bond are traced with a view to examining the evolving conception of the covalent bond. Beginning with the first quantum mechanical resolution of the apparent paradox in Lewis's conception of a shared electron pair bond by Heitler and London, the ensuing account takes up the challenge molecular orbital theory seemed to pose to the classical conception of the bond. We will see that the threat of delocalisation can be overstated, although it is questionable whether this should be seen as reinstating the issue of the existence of the chemical bond. More salient are some recent developments in a longstanding discussion of how to understand the causal aspects of the bonding interaction the nature of the force involved in the covalent link which are taken up in the latter part of the paper.

  • 35.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Transient Things and Permanent Stuff2010In: Australasian Journal of Philosophy, ISSN 0004-8402, E-ISSN 1471-6828, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 147-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A view of individuals as constituted of quantities of matter, both understood as continuants enduring over time, is elaborated in some detail. Constitution is a three-place relation which can't be collapsed to identity because of the place-holder for a time and because individuals and quantities of matter have such a radically different character. Individuals are transient entities with limited lifetimes, whereas quantities are permanent existents undergoing change in physical and chemical properties from time to time. Coincidence, considered as a matter of occupying the same place, is developed, alongside sameness of constitutive matter, as a criterion of identity for individuals. Quantities satisfy the mereological criterion of identity, applicable to entities subject to mereological relations and operations such as regions of space and intervals of time. A time-dependent analogue of mereological parthood is defined for individuals, in terms of which analogues of the other mereological relations can be defined. But it is argued that there is no analogue of the mereological operation of summation for individuals.

  • 36.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Unearthing a buried memory: Stefano Bordoni: Taming complexity: Duhem's third pathway in thermodynamics2014In: Metascience, ISSN 1467-9981, Vol. 23, p. 87-91Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Was Duhem Justified in not Distinguishing Between Physical and Chemical Atomism?2017In: Transversal: International Journal for the Historiography of Science, ISSN 2526-2270, Vol. 2, p. 108-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemists in the late nineteenth century were apt to distinguish the theory of chemical structure they advocated as chemical, as opposed to physical, atomism. The failure on Duhem’s part to consider any such distinction in his critique of atomism might be taken to be a lacuna in his argument. Far from being a weakness in his stance, however, I argue that he had good systematic reasons for not taking such a distinction seriously. 

  • 38.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Water and the Development of the Concept of Chemical Substance2010In: Ideas of water from ancient societies to the modern world  / [ed] Terje Tvedt and Terje Oestigaard, London: I.B. Tauris , 2010, p. 86-123Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Needham, Paul
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    What does hydrogen bonding say about the nature of the chemical bond?2014In: EPSA 2011: Perspectives and Foundational Problems in Philosophy of Science / [ed] Dennis Dieks and Vassilios Karakostas, New York: Springer, 2014, p. 321-330Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Needham, Paul
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Hendry, Robin FindlayDurham University, UK.Woody, Andrea I.University of Washington.
    Philosophy of Chemistry2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Needham, Paul
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Hendry, Robin
    Weisberg, Michael
    Philosophy of Chemistry2012In: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, ISSN 1095-5054, E-ISSN 1095-5054Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Needham, Paul
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Weisberg, Michael
    University of Pennsylvania.
    Matter, Structure, and Change: Aspects of the Philosophy of Chemistry2010In: Philosophy Compass, ISSN 1747-9991, Vol. 5, no 10, p. 927-937Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an overview of some of the contemporary debates in philosophy of chemistry. We discuss the nature of chemical substances, the individuation of chemical kinds, the relationship between chemistry and physics, and the nature of the chemical bond.

1 - 42 of 42
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf