Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Gunther, Torsten
    et al.
    Valdiosera, Cristina
    Malmström, Helena
    Urena, Irene
    Rodriguez-Varela, Ricardo
    Sverrisdottir, Oddny Osk
    Daskalaki, Evangelia A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Skoglund, Pontus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Uppsala University, Sweden; Harvard University, USA.
    Naidoo, Thijessen
    Svensson, Emma M.
    Maria Bermudez de Castro, Jose
    Carbonell, Eudald
    Dunn, Michael
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Iriarte, Eneko
    Arsuaga, Juan Luis
    Carretero, Jose-Miguel
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Ancient genomes link early farmers from Atapuerca in Spain to modern-day Basques2015In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 38, p. 11917-11922Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The consequences of the Neolithic transition in Europe-one of the most important cultural changes in human prehistory-is a subject of great interest. However, its effect on prehistoric and modern-day people in Iberia, the westernmost frontier of the European continent, remains unresolved. We present, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide sequence data from eight human remains, dated to between 5,500 and 3,500 years before present, excavated in the El Portalon cave at Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain. We show that these individuals emerged from the same ancestral gene pool as early farmers in other parts of Europe, suggesting that migration was the dominant mode of transferring farming practices throughout western Eurasia. In contrast to central and northern early European farmers, the Chalcolithic El Portalon individuals additionally mixed with local southwestern hunter-gatherers. The proportion of hunter-gatherer-related admixture into early farmers also increased over the course of two millennia. The Chalcolithic El Portalon individuals showed greatest genetic affinity to modern-day Basques, who have long been considered linguistic and genetic isolates linked to the Mesolithic whereas all other European early farmers show greater genetic similarity to modern-day Sardinians. These genetic links suggest that Basques and their language may be linked with the spread of agriculture during the Neolithic. Furthermore, all modern-day Iberian groups except the Basques display distinct admixture with Caucasus/Central Asian and North African groups, possibly related to historical migration events. The El Portalon genomes uncover important pieces of the demographic history of Iberia and Europe and reveal how prehistoric groups relate to modern-day people.

  • 2.
    Palkopoulou, Eleftheria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Mallick, Swapan
    Skoglund, Pontus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Harvard Medical School, USA; Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, USA.
    Enk, Jacob
    Rohland, Nadin
    Li, Heng
    Omrak, Ayca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Vartanyan, Sergey
    Poinar, Hendrik
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Reich, David
    Dalen, Love
    Complete Genomes Reveal Signatures of Demographic and Genetic Declines in the Woolly Mammoth2015In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 25, no 10, p. 1395-1400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The processes leading up to species extinctions are typically characterized by prolonged declines in population size and geographic distribution, followed by a phase in which populations are very small and may be subject to intrinsic threats, including loss of genetic diversity and inbreeding [1]. However, whether such genetic factors have had an impact on species prior to their extinction is unclear [2, 3]; examining this would require a detailed reconstruction of a species' demographic history as well as changes in genome-wide diversity leading up to its extinction. Here, we present high-quality complete genome sequences from two woolly mammoths (Mammuthus primigenius). The first mammoth was sequenced at 17.1-fold coverage and dates to similar to 4,300 years before present, representing one of the last surviving individuals on Wrangel Island. The second mammoth, sequenced at 11.2-fold coverage, was obtained from an similar to 44,800-year-old specimen from the Late Pleistocene population in northeastern Siberia. The demographic trajectories inferred from the two genomes are qualitatively similar and reveal a population bottleneck during the Middle or Early Pleistocene, and a more recent severe decline in the ancestors of the Wrangel mammoth at the end of the last glaciation. A comparison of the two genomes shows that the Wrangel mammoth has a 20% reduction in heterozygosity as well as a 28-fold increase in the fraction of the genome that comprises runs of homozygosity. We conclude that the population on Wrangel Island, which was the last surviving woolly mammoth population, was subject to reduced genetic diversity shortly before it became extinct.

  • 3.
    Skoglund, Pontus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Harvard Medical School, USA; Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, USA.
    Ersmark, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Palkopoulou, Eleftheria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Dalen, Love
    Ancient Wolf Genome Reveals an Early Divergence of Domestic Dog Ancestors and Admixture into High-Latitude Breeds2015In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 25, no 11, p. 1515-1519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The origin of domestic dogs is poorly understood [1-15], with suggested evidence of dog-like features in fossils that predate the Last Glacial Maximum [6, 9, 10, 14, 16] conflicting with genetic estimates of a more recent divergence between dogs and worldwide wolf populations [13, 15, 17-19]. Here, we present a draft genome sequence from a 35,000 year-old wolf from the Taimyr Peninsula in northern Siberia. We find that this individual belonged to a population that diverged from the common ancestor of present-day wolves and dogs very close in time to the appearance of the domestic dog lineage. We use the directly dated ancient wolf genome to recalibrate the molecular timescale of wolves and dogs and find that the mutation rate is substantially slower than assumed by most previous studies, suggesting that the ancestors of dogs were separated from present-day wolves before the Last Glacial Maximum. We also find evidence of introgression from the archaic Taimyr wolf lineage into present-day dog breeds from northeast Siberia and Greenland, contributing between 1.4% and 27.3% of their ancestry. This demonstrates that the ancestry of present-day dogs is derived from multiple regional wolf populations.

  • 4.
    Skoglund, Pontus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Harvard Medical School, USA; Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, USA.
    Posth, Cosimo
    Sirak, Kendra
    Spriggs, Matthew
    Valentin, Frederique
    Bedford, Stuart
    Clark, Geoffrey R.
    Reepmeyer, Christian
    Petchey, Fiona
    Fernandes, Daniel
    Fu, Qiaomei
    Harney, Eadaoin
    Lipson, Mark
    Mallick, Swapan
    Novak, Mario
    Rohland, Nadin
    Stewardson, Kristin
    Abdullah, Syafiq
    Cox, Murray P.
    Friedlaender, Francoise R.
    Friedlaender, Jonathan S.
    Kivisild, Toomas
    Koki, George
    Kusuma, Pradiptajati
    Merriwether, D. Andrew
    Ricaut, Francois-X.
    Wee, Joseph T. S.
    Patterson, Nick
    Krause, Johannes
    Pinhasi, Ron
    Reich, David
    Genomic insights into the peopling of the Southwest Pacific2016In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 538, no 7626, p. 510-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The appearance of people associated with the Lapita culture in the South Pacific around 3,000 years ago(1) marked the beginning of the last major human dispersal to unpopulated lands. However, the relationship of these pioneers to the long-established Papuan people of the New Guinea region is unclear. Here we present genome-wide ancient DNA data from three individuals from Vanuatu (about 3,100-2,700 years before present) and one from Tonga (about 2,700-2,300 years before present), and analyse them with data from 778 present-day East Asians and Oceanians. Today, indigenous people of the South Pacific harbour a mixture of ancestry from Papuans and a population of East Asian origin that no longer exists in unmixed form, but is a match to the ancient individuals. Most analyses have interpreted the minimum of twenty-five per cent Papuan ancestry in the region today as evidence that the first humans to reach Remote Oceania, including Polynesia, were derived from population mixtures near New Guinea, before their further expansion into Remote Oceania(2-5). However, our finding that the ancient individuals had little to no Papuan ancestry implies that later human population movements spread Papuan ancestry through the South Pacific after the first peopling of the islands.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf