Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 55
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bahati, Bernard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. University of Rwanda, Rwanda.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Using student-generated questions and peer-responses as a formative e-assessment strategy: Students acting as more knowledgeable others2017In: Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education / [ed] Jon Dron, Sanjaya Mishra, Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 2017, p. 108-117Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Student-generated questions and peer-responses can support formative assessment practices through student self-questioning and peer scaffolding. So far, the studies on student-generated questions and peer-responses have focused on reading comprehension. This study focused on student-generated questions used in the context of the student-based formative e-assessment through peer scaffolding. This study's aim was two-fold: Firstly, we wanted to examine whether there was a relationship between the thinking levels exhibited in student-generated questions and the thinking levels exhibited in their corresponding peer-responses. Secondly, we wanted to analyse the level of students’ satisfaction with their peers’ responses. Using a Bloom’s Taxonomy-based assessment rubric, the student generated-questions and peer-responses were rated following three thinking levels: basic, medium, and high. The results show that the thinking levels exhibited in the student-generated questions are not the same as the thinking levels exhibited in their corresponding peer-responses. In addition, all students were not immediately satisfied with their peer-responses. In the end, we realised that through this exercise, the student-questioners and the student-respondents were respectively engaged in a “meaning-seeking” and “meaning-making” exercise and the longer the time for reaching the consensus, the more this exercise grew stronger and became much more significant.

  • 2.
    Bahati, Bernard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. University of Rwanda, Rwanda.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Benegusenga, Alphonse
    Using structured learning e-journals as a formative e-assessment strategy: Guiding student-teachers to reflect on their learning through the mirror, microscope, and binoculars2018In: Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference / [ed] Elizabeth Langran, Jered Borup, Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 2018, p. 1124-1133Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on the use of electronic journals to promote reflective learning among student-teachers have mainly focused on the students’ reflection and their learning experience in the context of the teaching practicum. Using e-journal guiding questions and an analytical reflection rubric, this study examined the extent to which the student-teachers reflected on their learning and how their reflective skills evolved through e-journal keeping in the context of the teaching and learning process of a blended course. The results showed that most of the students’ responses to e-journal guiding questions were in non-reflection and reflection levels while few responses were in critical-reflection reflection level. The study also indicated that the longer the time for using e-journals, the more the student-teachers’ reflective skills improved. In the end, the study recommends continued efforts in designing, developing and implementing instructional events whereby student-teachers can have opportunities to exercise and sustain their reflective skills over an extended period of time.

  • 3.
    Bahati, Bernard
    et al.
    University of Rwanda, Rwanda.
    Fors, Uno
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mukama, Evode
    University of Rwanda, Rwanda.
    Measuring Learner Satisfaction with Formative e-Assessment Strategies2019In: International Journal: Emerging Technologies in Learning, ISSN 1868-8799, E-ISSN 1863-0383, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 61-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The student experience with different aspects of online instructional settings has been the focus of educational practitioners and researchers in many studies. However, concerning technology-enabled formative assessment, little is known about student satisfaction regarding different possible formative e-assessment strategies the students are involved in. Using a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire, a web-based survey was developed to examine students’ satisfaction with the formative e-assessment strategies within an enriched virtual blended course. The results show that, in general, the students were satisfied with the quality of their engagement and the quality of feedback across all the formative e-assessment activities offered. The results also show that the student satisfaction varied between and within the formative e-assessment strategies. However, the gap between the student satisfaction mean ratings across all formative e-assessment strategies was marginal and could not help researchers decide upon which formative e-assessment strategy that stood out as the most preferred one. Learner satisfaction with different formative e-assessment strategies was positively correlated to each other at various levels but no relationship was found between students’ scores on the final course exam and learner satisfaction with formative e-assessment strategies. In the end, the study recommends a sustained and integrated use of the all three formative e-assessment strategies (online knowledge survey, online student-generated questions and peer-responses, and electronic reflective journals) in the context of hybrid courses. Further studies that would widen, diversify both the scope and the research instruments to investigate learner satisfaction with formative e-assessment strategies were also suggested.

  • 4. Benyon, David
    et al.
    Gambäck, Björn
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mival, Oli
    Webb, Nick
    How Was Your Day? Evaluating a Conversational Companion2013In: IEEE Transactions on Affective Computing, ISSN 1949-3045, E-ISSN 1949-3045, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 299-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The How Was Your Day(HWYD) companion is an embodied conversational agent that can discuss work-related issues, entering free-form dialogues while discussing issues surrounding a typical work day. The open-ended nature of these interactions requires new models of evaluation. Here, we describe a paradigm and methodology for evaluating the main aspects of such functionality in conjunction with overall system behavior, with respect to three parameters: functional ability (i.e., does it do the rightthing conversationally), content (i.e., does it respond appropriately to the semantic context), and emotional behavior (i.e., given the emotional input from the user, does it respond in an emotionally appropriate way). We demonstrate the functionality of our evaluation paradigm as a method for both grading current system performance, and targeting areas for particular performance review. We show correlation between, for example, automatic speech recognition performance and overall system performance (as is expected in systems of this type), but beyond this, we show where individual utterances or responses, indicated as positive or negative, characterize system performance, and demonstrate how our combination evaluation approach highlights issues (both positive and negative) in the companion system's interaction behavior.

  • 5. Collins-Thompson, Kevyn
    et al.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hauff, Claudia
    Search as Learning: Report from Dagstuhl Seminar 170922017In: Dagstuhl Reports, E-ISSN 2192-5283, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 135-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes the program and the results of Dagstuhl Seminar 17092 "Search as Learning", which brought together 26 researchers from diverse research backgrounds. The motivation for the seminar stems from the fact that modern Web search engines are largely engineered and optimized to fulfill lookup tasks instead of complex search tasks. The latter though are an essential component of information discovery and learning. The 3-day seminar started with four perspective talks, providing four different views on the topic of search as learning: interactive information retrieval (IR), psychology, education and system-oriented IR. The remainder of the seminar centered around breakout groups leading to new views on the challenges and issues in search as learning, interspersed with research spotlight talks.

  • 6. Eriksson, Sara
    et al.
    Gustavsson, Filip
    Larsson, Gustav
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Takt: The Wearable Timepiece That Enables Sensory Perception of Time2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 223-227Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows that people with ADHD have difficulties adjusting to the normative structure of time. Through an iterative participatory design process with students diagnosed with ADHD, different conceptions and representations of time were explored to create a design that better suits their needs. Based on the findings that visual resources are used to understand the duration of time and the lack of an internal clock to help tell the passage of time, we created Takt. Takt relies on touch and vision to enable users to tell the passage of time using their senses rather than relying on the cognition required to read the information on a clock.

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    HeartBeats – A Speculative Proposal For Ritualization of Digital Objects2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 218-222Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we propose HeartBeats, a speculative design proposal that embodies digital immortality. Based on previous research and user studies, HeartBeats addresses a growing need for design to support ritualization of digital data in the context of bereavement. Our aim is to stimulate discussion about digital immortality and afterlife. By challenging perceived characteristics and qualities of inherited data, we hope to open design spaces to better enable ritualization of digital objects in bereavement.

  • 8. Fardous, Jannatul
    et al.
    Du, Jia Tina
    Raymond Choo, Kim-Kwang
    Huang, Songshan (Sam)
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Exploring Collaborative Information Search Behavior of Mobile Social Media Users in Trip Planning2017In: iConference 2017: Proceedings, iSchools, 2017, p. 435-444Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social media is an increasingly important source for tourists seeking information about their intending holidays. Tourists obtain travel related information by interacting with their social networks. However, social media users’ collaborative search behavior is an under-studied area. This paper investigates collaborative search behavior of mobile social media users when they plan for a group trip. We surveyed sixty-three (63) Australian participants. Findings show that tourists collaborated on social media for a range of trip planning activities, such as searching, gathering, obtaining, sharing and validating information at different stages of the trip planning process. Notable findings include 92.10% of participants used Facebook messenger for collaborations, and the majority (62.96%) searched on social media for information about attractions to see at their destination; also, 73.80% used social media to gather information related to their travel at the beginning of their planning process and 41% used social media at the end of planning process to validate information for their travel decision-making. About 42.86% changed their minds as a result of social media interactions.

  • 9. Freund, Luanne
    et al.
    He, Jiyin
    Gwizdka, Jacek
    Kando, Noriko
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Young Rieh, Soo
    Searching as learning (SAL) workshop 20142014In: Proceedings of the 5th Information Interaction in Context Symposium - IIiX' 14 / [ed] David Elsweiler, New York: ACM Press, 2014, p. 7-7Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10. Gwizdka, Jacek
    et al.
    Hansen, PrebenStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.Hauff, ClaudiaHe, JiyinKando, Noriko
    Proceedings of the Second International Workshop on Search as Learning2016Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Search systems to date are viewed more as tools for the retrieval of content to satisfy immediate information needs, than as part of larger complex information environments in which humans learn while interacting with information content. Since users increasingly learn informally while searching as well as use search systems as tools for self-study, there is a growing recognition of the importance to address the challenges of designing, developing, and evaluating search systems (algorithms, interfaces, etc.) that foster discovery and enhance learning outside of formal educational settings.

    The second international workshop on Search as Learning aims to flesh out research directions and methodologies, and survey state-of-the-art approaches in this important emerging research area. Further, this workshop wishes to bring together researchers with backgrounds in information science (IS), human-computer interaction (HCI), and information retrieval (IR), with the goal of integrating conceptual, experimental, and simulationbased approaches and methodologies from within these different fields, thus allowing the transformation of search systems as isolated information access tools into systems that provide support for learning directly and that consider the broader outcomes of searching beyond a set of search results.

  • 11. Gwizdka, Jacek
    et al.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hauff, Claudia
    He, Jiyin
    Kando, Noriko
    Search as Learning (SAL) Workshop 20162016In: Proceedings of the 39th International ACM SIGIR conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 1249-1250Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The "Search as Learning" (SAL) workshop is focused on an area within the information retrieval field that is only beginning to emerge: supporting users in their learning whilst interacting with information content.

  • 12.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Initial Design of CIS and Making Sense in an Ad-Hoc Team-Based Crisis Situation.2013In: CIS 2013 Workshop: Consolidating the past, Creating the future, ACM Press , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Hansen, Preben
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Anni, Järvelin
    Gunnar, Eriksson
    Jussi, Karlgren
    A Use Case Framework for Information Access Evaluation2014In: Professional Search in the Modern World: COST Action IC1002 on Multilingual and Multifaceted Interactive Information Access / [ed] Georgios Paltoglou, Fernando Loizides, Preben Hansen, Cham: Springer, 2014, no 1, p. 6-22Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Hansen, Preben
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansson, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Exploring Student and Supervisor Interaction During the SciPro Thesis Process: Two Use Cases2017In: International Journal of Distance Education Technologies, ISSN 1539-3100, E-ISSN 1539-3119, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 33-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Common problems identified by students during their interaction with supervisors are too little instructions as well as infrequent and insufficient supervisor feedback. The SciPro system has been developed to tackle these problems. This paper describes, analyze and discuss the interaction between students and supervisors using the SciPro system. Through two use cases involving two supervisors and 38 bachelor and master students, the authors show that the structure implemented in SciPro supports and allows for different pedagogical approaches and supervision styles. Ten different types of interactions in the thesis process are identified. In order to explain why some students do not complete within the timeframe, the authors identify six categories of problems: 1) language skills, 2) inability to apply research methods, 3) ability for self-study, 4) lack of creativity, 5) limited knowledge about how to write academic work, and 6) lack of motivation. The collaborative stage of group-supervision may be one possible way to deal with the different type of support for the process of managing student theses.

  • 15.
    Hansen, Preben
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansson, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Optimizing Student and Supervisor Interaction During the SciPro Thesis Process – Concepts and Design2015In: Advances in Web-Based Learning - ICWL 2015: Proceedings / [ed] Frederick W.B. Li, Ralf Klamma, Mart Laanpere, Jun Zhang, Baltasar Fernández Manjón, Rynson W.H. Lau, Springer, 2015, p. 245-250Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order for students to complete their bachelor, master and Ph.D. theses they need feedback, cues, guidance and supervision. Common problems perceived by students are too little instructions as well as infrequent and insufficient supervisor feedback. At Stockholm University, the SciPro (Supporting the Scientific Process) system has been developed to tackle these problems. This paper describes, analyze and discuss the interaction between students and supervisors using the SciPro system. The results show high level of interaction between students and supervisors in the thesis handling process. However, six special groups of needs were identified: support for (1) language(s), (2) research methods, (3) self-study, (4) creativity, (5) “How to write”, and (6) inspiration and motivation. The collaborative stage of group-supervision may be one possible way to deal with the different type of support for the process of managing student theses.

  • 16.
    Hansen, Preben
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Järvelin, Anni
    Järvelin, Antti
    Exploring manual and automatic query formulation in patent IR: Initial query construction and query generation process2013In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 69, no 6, p. 873-898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study aims to examine manually formulated queries and automatic query generation in an early phase of a patent “prior art” search.

    Design/methodology/approach – The study was performed partly within a patent domain setting, involving three professional patent examiners, and partly in the context of the CLEF 2009 Intellectual Property (CLEF-IP) track. For the exploratory study of user-based query formulation, three patent examiners performed the same three simulated real-life patent tasks. For the automatic query generation, a simple term-weighting algorithm based on the RATF formula was used. The manually and automatically created queries were compared to analyse what kinds of keywords and from which parts of the patent documents were selected.

    Findings – For user-formulated queries, it was found that patent documents were read in a specific order of importance and that the time varied. Annotations and collaboration were made while reading and selecting/ranking terms. Ranking terms was experienced to be harder than selecting terms. For the automatic formulated queries, it was found that the term frequencies used in the RATF alone will not quite approximate what terms will be judged as relevant query terms by the users. Simultaneously, the results suggest that developing a query generation tool for generating initial queries based on patent documents is feasible.

    Research limitations/implications – These preliminary but informative results need to be viewed in the light that only three patent experts were observed and that a small set of topics was used.

    Originality/value – It is usually difficult to get access to the setting of the patent domain and the results of the study show that the methodology provided a feasible way to study manual and the manual query formulation of the patent engineer.

  • 17.
    Hansen, Preben
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    L. Wilson, Max
    Larsen, Birger
    Norling, Kristian
    Russell-Rose, Tony
    Report on EuroHCIR 2013: the 3rd European Workshop on Human-Computer Interaction and Information Retrieval2013In: SIGIR Forum, ISSN 0163-5840, E-ISSN 1558-0229, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 78-83Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Hansen, Preben
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Loizides, Fernando
    Ioannou, Andri
    Interacting with Technology to Interact Physically: Investigating Affordances of Tabletops to Facilitate Collaboration for Conflicting Users2016In: Advances in Web-Based Learning – ICWL 2016: 15th International Conference, Rome, Italy, October 26–29, 2016, Proceedings / [ed] Dickson K.W. Chiu, Ivana Marenzi, Umberto Nanni, Marc Spaniol, Marco Temperini, Springer, 2016, p. 266-270Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, we investigated the affordances of tabletops in order to begin testing them within a specialised and sensitive collaborative learning environment; namely, that with users in conflict. We utilised a bespoke prototype application named ‘IdeaSpace’ which makes use of multi-touch interactive tabletop technology and is specifically designed to encourage user collaboration. We tested the usability and interaction with a group of users as a pilot test, followed by a second test in a shared space with crowds of users serendipitously using the tabletop in an open, public space. From the tests we identified and isolated findings directly relating to collaboration elements needing attention before introducing IdeaSpace to participants in conflict.

  • 19.
    Hansen, Preben
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Shah, ChiragKlas, Claus-Peter
    Collaborative information seeking: best practices, new domains, new thoughts2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Hansen, Preben
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Widén, Gunilla
    The embeddedness of collaborative information seeking in information culture2017In: Journal of information science, ISSN 0165-5515, E-ISSN 1741-6485, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 554-566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Professionally, people often conduct their work in settings containing a range of different collaborative situations and work practices in which people handle information and work activities. Still, work tasks are usually considered and perceived as individual activities although the technology and the characteristics of the tasks require collaborative and cooperative handling processes. This viewpoint still produces technologies that, in general, assume individual information management and decision-making. Based on previous research on information culture (IC) and collaborative information seeking (CIS), this paper proposes an integrated framework where both environmental (cultural) as well as collaborative aspects of organisational information behaviour are present. This kind of framework would be useful in studies looking into how information is retrieved, how information is organised and managed, and how information is used as a resource in collaborative settings. It gives a more holistic perspective to information use and practices in organisations where culture, collaboration and awareness are especially brought to common attention for effective information management in organisations.

  • 21.
    Hansen, Preben
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Young Rieh, Soo
    Recent advances on searching as learning: An introduction to the special issue2016In: Journal of information science, ISSN 0165-5515, E-ISSN 1741-6485, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 3-6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Hedberg, Hillevi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rahmani, Rahim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    A Systematic Review of Learning Trough Mobile Augmented Reality2018In: International Journal of Interactive Mobile Technologies (iJIM), ISSN 1865-7923, E-ISSN 1865-7923, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 75-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the beginning of 2000, researchers started to see the potential of using Augmented Reality (AR) in educational and foresaw that further research within the field. Since then, AR research have taken many different approaches. This is also true for AR in relation to pedagogical purposes. This study is to investigate what has been studied within the AR field related to mobile augmented reality. It attempts to make systematic review of how learning and pedagogical aspects have been approached in the articles. In recent years, mobile augmented reality has become increasingly interesting due to the mobile devices small form factors and their ability to let the students move around freely while learning. The aim of this study is to make a systematic review of pedagogical uses of mobile augmented reality. Based on a review of previous literature of mobile AR systems for pedagogical purposes, published between 2000-2017, make it possible to see in which direction mobile AR systems for education are heading and how future mobile AR systems should be designed to best fit the needs of future students so they can more effectively improve their learning.

  • 23. Hertzum, Morten
    et al.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Empirical studies of collaborative information seeking: a review of methodological issues2019In: Journal of Documentation, ISSN 0022-0418, E-ISSN 1758-7379, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 140-163Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Information seeking is often performed in collaborative contexts. The research into such collaborative information seeking (CIS) has been proceeding since the 1990s but lacks methodological discussions. The purpose of this paper is to analyze and discuss methodological issues in existing CIS studies. Design/methodology/approach The authors systematically review 69 empirical CIS studies. Findings The review shows that the most common methods of data collection are lab experiments (43 percent), observation (19 percent) and surveys (16 percent), that the most common methods of data analysis are description (33 percent), statistical testing (29 percent) and content analysis (19 percent) and that CIS studies involve a fairly even mix of novice, intermediate and specialist participants. However, the authors also find that CIS research is dominated by exploratory studies, leaves it largely unexplored in what ways the findings of a study may be specific to the particular study setting, appears to assign primacy to precision at the expense of generalizability, struggles with investigating how CIS activities extend over time and provides data about behavior to a larger extent than about reasons, experiences and especially outcomes. Research limitations/implications The major implication of this review is its identification of the need for a shared model to which individual CIS studies can contribute in a cumulative manner. To support the development of such a model, the authors discuss a model of the core CIS process and a model of the factors that trigger CIS. Originality/value This study assesses the current state of CIS research, provides guidance for future CIS studies and aims to inspire further methodological discussion.

  • 24. Huang, Tien-Chi
    et al.
    Chang, Shu-Hsuan
    Yu Shu, Vera
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lee, Sung-Lin
    Developing a Curriculum of Maker Education in Taiwan Higher Education2017In: Emerging Technologies for Education: Revised Selected Papers / [ed] Tien-Chi Huang, Rynson Lau, Yueh-Min Huang, Marc Spaniol, Chun-Hung Yuen, Springer, 2017, p. 433-437Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Maker Education is a practice-oriented movement that has risen in the last decade, and emphasizes more on innovation, creativity and problem solving. Maker Education is based on knowledge, directed by creation, and is aimed at solving problems. This study, aimed at the curriculum of the Department of Information Management, expects to develop a systematic information Maker curriculum. This curriculum, combined with the 3D printing machine and Arduino open hardware configured with the STEM education framework, is designed to explore the impact of the introduction of Maker education to information curriculum of technical or vocational colleges on attitude differences and learning of STEM. Two courses, 3D model design and Arduino programming, are implemented, after the end of which, students’ achievements are evaluated. The result is that male still have higher interests in science, engineering and technology than women, but Maker curriculum is multifaceted and foundational so that many people can spend a little time in learning and use various skills to produce their own works. Therefore, there is little difference between women and men in scores of achievement test.

  • 25. Huvila, Isto
    et al.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nicolaisen, Jeppe
    Pharo, Nils
    Library and information science in the Nordic countries: from the present to the future2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26. Hyldegård, Jette
    et al.
    Hertzum, Morten
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Studying Collaborative Information Seeking: Experiences with Three Methods2015In: Collaborative Information Seeking: Best Practices, New Domains and New Thoughts / [ed] Preben Hansen, Chirag Shah, Claus-Peter Klas, Springer, 2015, p. 17-35Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative information seeking (CIS) has lately produced interesting empirical studies, describing CIS in real-life settings. While these studies explore how and why CIS manifests itself in different domains, discussions about how to study CIS have been scarce. The research area of CIS may, however, benefit from a discussion of methodological issues. This chapter describes the application of three methods for collecting and analyzing data in three CIS studies. The three methods are Multidimensional Exploration, used in a CIS study of students' information behavior during a group assignment; Task-structured Observation, used in a CIS study of patent engineers; and Condensed Observation, used in a CIS study of information-systems development. The three methods are presented in the context of the studies for which they were devised, and the experiences gained using the methods are discussed. The chapter shows that different methods can be used for collecting and analyzing data about CIS incidents. Two of the methods focused on tasks and events in work settings, while the third was applied in an educational setting. Commonalities and differences among the methods are discussed to inform decisions about their applicability in future CIS studies and, more generally, to foster methodological discussions in CIS research.

  • 27. Imhof, Melanie
    et al.
    Braschler, Martin
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rietberger, Stefan
    Evaluation for operational IR applications: generalizability and automation2013In: LivingLab '13 Proceedings of the 2013 workshop on Living labs for information retrieval evaluation, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 11-12Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Black box information retrieval (IR) application evaluation allows practitioners to measure the quality of their IR application. Instead of evaluating specific components, e.g. solely the search engine, a complete IR application, including the user's perspective, is evaluated. The evaluation methodology is designed to be applicable to operational IR applications. The black box evaluation methodology could be packaged into an evaluation and monitoring tool, making it usable for industry stakeholders. The tool should lead practitioners through the evaluation process and maintain the test results for the manual and automatic tests. This paper shows that the methodology is generalizable, even though the diversity of IR applications is high. The challenges in automating tests are the simulation of tasks that require intellectual effort and the handling of different visualizations of the same concept.

  • 28. Li, Andol X.
    et al.
    Lou, Xiaolong
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Peng, Ren
    Improving the User Engagement in Large Display Using Distance-Driven Adaptive Interface2016In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 462-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Current large display-based user interfaces are mainly derived from normal-sized desktop screens and the extra-large size causes difficulties in information navigation and perception. Therefore, user engagement in large display-based information interaction is relatively low. In order to address the user engagement issue, in this paper we propose the distance-driven adaptive interface, which specialises in performing navigation tasks within large displays. We conducted an initial exploratory study with 30 participants to examine how the distance correlated with interaction performances in large displays. Given the findings we conducted an experimental study with an additional 31 participants to further investigate how the distance-driven interface satisfies users' distance requirements and improves user engagement within six dimensions. The results show that the distance-driven interface offered a statistically significant user engagement improvement in terms of novelty, felt involvement, focused attention and endurability. Importantly, linear correlations between the distance, interaction efficiency and accuracy were identified-in that efficiency increased and accuracy decreased with increasing distance.

  • 29. Li, Andol X.
    et al.
    Lou, Xiaolong
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Peng, Ren
    On the Influence of Distance in the Interaction With Large Displays2016In: IEEE/OSA Journal of Display Technology, ISSN 1551-319X, E-ISSN 1558-9323, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 840-850Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As reported by a recent survey, over half of large display purchases are conducted for productivity purposes, while the remainder are purchased for a variety of purposes such as gaming and advertising. These large displays have advanced visibility, scalability, and accessibility characteristics and thus benefit perceived usability. However, usability issues such as the difficulties in precisely accessing distal information on large displays while on the move are still of concern. Therefore, in this paper, we investigate the influence of moving distance on perceived usability in interactions with large displays. Comparative study results show inconsistent perceived usability throughout a range of distances, which differs from standard usability conventions. Moreover, the results show a correlation between distance and perceived usability in that, as the distance from commonly visited ranges increases, the perceived usability level decreases, and vice versa. The study demonstrates that distance is an effective interaction modality in large-display interactions, although it has weaknesses such as limited input channels.

  • 30. Li, Xiangdong A.
    et al.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lou, Xiaolong
    Geng, Weidong
    Peng, Ren
    Design and Evaluation of Cross-Objects User Interface for Whiteboard Interaction2017In: Distributed, Ambient and Pervasive Interactions: Proceedings / [ed] Norbert Streitz, Panos Markopoulos, Springer, 2017, p. 180-191Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whiteboard has long been an important tool for education and communication, and nowadays it embraces display functions and other interactive features such as pen pointing and selecting of digital contents. Despite the enhanced interactivity, it is often time- and cost-consuming to implement specific apparatus for different whiteboard interactions. Therefore, we aimed at incorporating physical-world objects (e.g. Lego Rubik’s cubes) as the cross-objects user interface for multiple whiteboard interaction tasks without incurring heavy development work. The user interface utilised electromagnetic technique to extract electromechanical signals and recognised normal objects, thus extended the generality. To further understand effectiveness of the user interface, we implemented a low-fidelity prototype and conducted within-subject evaluation. The results showed the cross-objects user interface was natural, responsive, and easy of learning as the conventional whiteboard. Moreover, the user interface outperformed over the conventional one in the perspectives of configuration efficiency and versatility of multiple interaction tasks. Given these findings, practical implications for future tangible user interface design for whiteboard interactions are discussed.

  • 31. Lou, Xianglong
    et al.
    Peng, Ren
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Li, Xiangdong A.
    Effects of User’s Hand Orientation and Spatial Movements on Free Hand Interactions with Large Displays2018In: International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 1044-7318, E-ISSN 1532-7590, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 519-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In motion-sensing interaction with large displays through bare hands, we can observe that users alternate their hands and move their bodies frequently. What cause such actions and how these actions affect free hand interaction results are less systematically investigated. To address this gap in knowledge, we conducted studies on Pointer-Acceleration (PA)-based free hand interactions of target selection and found that (1) users made more frequent hand alternations when selecting small targets with large movement amplitudes, as in such cases users were not only affected by observable arm fatigue, but were also motivated to switch hands for higher selection accuracy and convenience; (2) hand alternation led to the hand orientation effects: target selection on display areas at the operating hand’s side was more efficient and accurate than that at the opposite side; (3) large movement amplitudes on the user interface increased users’ physical movements in front of the large display, which harmed selection efficiency; (4) selection of small targets led to a closer interaction distance, while large movement amplitudes led to a larger interaction distance; and (5) selection results were affected by interaction distances, as users gained high efficiency, but low accuracy at a large distance and low efficiency, but high accuracy at a close distance. Given these results, this article discusses practical implications for applying PA-based free hand interaction techniques and designing related user interfaces on large displays.

  • 32. Lou, Xiaolong
    et al.
    Li, Andol X.
    Peng, Ren
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Optimizing Free Hand Selection in Large Displays by Adapting to User’s Physical Movements2016In: Proceedings of the 2016 Symposium on Spatial User Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 23-31Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Advance in motion sensing technologies such as Microsoft Kinect and ASUS Xtion has enabled users to select targets on a large display through natural hand gestures. In such interaction, the users move left and right to navigate the display, and they frequently adjust body proximity against the display thus to switch between overall views and focus views. These physical movements benefit information navigation, interaction modality switch, and user interface adaptation. But in more specific context of free hand selection in large displays, the effect of physical movements is less systematically investigated. To explore the potential of physical movements in free hand selection, a physical movements-adapted technique is developed and evaluated. The results show that the new technique has significant improvements in both selection efficiency and accuracy, the more difficult selection task the more obvious improvement in accuracy. Additionally, the new technique is preferred to the baseline of pointer acceleration (PA) technique by participants.

  • 33. Meyer, Anika
    et al.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Fouri, Ina
    Assessing the potential of third space to design a creative virtual academic space based on findings from information behaviour2018In: Information research, ISSN 1368-1613, E-ISSN 1368-1613, Vol. 23, no 4, article id isic1814Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. This paper explores the notion and use of third space as conceptualised by Kuhlthau, Maniotes and Caspari on guided inquiry in information literacy and in human computer interaction literature. Creative processes are part in many academic disciplines. Information seeking triggers creativity in many ways, especially in learning processes. Virtual makerspaces can supplement educational virtual environments. This paper assesses the use of a third space lens for the planning of virtual makerspaces supporting academic creativity (based on findings from information behaviour studies), as seen from both information literacy and human computer interaction perspectives. Method. The paper is based on (i) findings from an empirical study in a creative academic context, (ii) scoping literature reviews of: creativity and information behaviour, search as learning, third space, and makerspaces. Analysis. Findings on information needs, information behaviour and creativity and search as learning are mapped against what an academic virtual makerspace can offer when applying a third space lens. Cognitive, affective, and physical perspectives are acknowledged. Findings. Both virtual academic makerspaces and third space holds value for information supportive environments for creativity and must build on findings on information behaviour. Conclusion. Further research should consider practical implementation.

  • 34.
    Newman, Kristine
    et al.
    Ryerson University,Canada; Cockwell School of Nursing.
    Knight, Simon
    Open University, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, UK, , Knowledge Media Institute.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Stefanie, Elbeshausen
    University of Hildesheim, Hildesheim, Germany, , Department of Information Science & Natural Language Processing.
    Situating CIS: The Importance of Context in Collaborative Information Seeking2015In: Collaborative Information Seeking: Best Practices, New Domains, New Thoughts / [ed] Preben Hansen, Chirag Shah, Claus-Peter Klas, Springer, 2015, p. 37-54Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative Information Seeking (CIS) is common in many professional contexts. This chapter discusses CIS from four different perspectives – education, healthcare, science research and patent research. We first introduce the CIS context, focusing on Evans and Chi’s proposed model of social search. We highlight the ways contextual factors relate to the search process, in particular noting the role of communication in CIS processes. The four example professional contexts are discussed with reference to the ‘medium’ of collaboration, the ways CIS is conducted, the tools used and physical setting of CIS, and the ‘context’ of CIS, the purposes for which an instance of CIS occurs in that discipline. We suggest that these contextual factors can be aligned with, but are additional to, the existing Evans and Chi model of social search, and that their addition in a ‘pre- and post-model’ extension could provide a shared framework for researching contextual features of CIS. In highlighting commonalities and contrasts across the disciplinary contexts we suggest that a developed model, and further research, is needed to understand the relationship between motivations in these different disciplines and the evaluation of CIS episodes, and the role of processes, particularly communication, in those episodes. In order to evaluate CIS in different disciplines future research should focus on the between, and within discipline differences in the purposes of CIS. Characteristics of success in different disciplinary contexts may relate both to the consideration of the collaborative context, and the information need; developing deeper understanding of this point.

  • 35. Paltoglou, Georgios
    et al.
    Loizides, FernandoHansen, PrebenStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Professional Search in the Modern World: COST Action IC1002 on Multilingual and multifaceted Interactive Information Access2014Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this book are to present, discuss, analyze, and review outstanding research, recent developments, and new directions in all aspects related to multi-faceted and interactive information access with a focus on professional and enterprise search. It brings together material that has been published in a fragmentary way in journals and conference papers into a coherent whole but also presents novel, unpublished work. The work is tightly linked to the COST Action IC1002 on Multilingual and Multifaceted Interactive Information Access (MUMIA) whose objective is to foster research and technology transfer between a diverse set of disciplines working on different aspects of next-generation information systems. Contributions include chapters from distinguished academics and researchers from the fields of information retrieval (IR), natural language processing (NLP), and human-computer interaction (HCI).

  • 36.
    Parviainen, Emmi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lagerström, Ellinor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Compost table - participatory design towards sustainability2016In: Proceedings of the 30th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2016) / [ed] Shamal Faily, Nan Jiang, Huseyin Dogan, Jacqui Taylor, British Computer Society , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the participatory design methods used to produce a design with an aim of creating an emotional investment for the users. The designers in the project were the users themselves with facilitators guiding them throughout the five phases of the project; contextual inquiry, future workshop, low-fi prototyping, hi-fi prototyping and evaluation. Participatory design plays a great role in order to create and deliver a product that reflects the needs of a user. With a persuasive design in mind we argue for the importance of creating a deeper connection between a design and user. The paper shows how an artefact is capable of achieving the desired behaviour if associated with emotions, in this his case, to recycle and to bring a user closer to nature and therefore motivating a fusion with the environment.

  • 37.
    Parviainen, Emmi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lagerström, Ellinor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Composting as Interior Design: Encouraging Sustainability throughout a Participatory Design Process2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems Pages, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 167-171Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Could recycling become an interesting activity instead of a compulsive requirement? 20 participants in Stockholm, Sweden participated in a study to determine why recycling is still a problem on an individual scale. The designers of the project were the users themselves with facilitators guiding them throughout the five phases of the participatory design project; contextual inquiry, future workshop, low-fi and hi-fi prototyping, and evaluation. The final design is an indoor compost that helps the user see the effects of recycling on a more personal level. We argue for the importance of creating a deeper connection between the design and the user by showing how an artefact can achieve the desired behaviour when associated with emotions. In this case, recycling can bring a user closer to nature.

  • 38. Parviainen, Emmi
    et al.
    Lagerström, Ellinor
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Transform Your Kids Into Self Sustainable Power Plants: Teaching Sustainable Behaviour to Young Users2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 155-160Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a gap between people's attitudes and feelings toward sustainability, the environment, and their own contribution. Attitudes and knowledge can predict environmental behaviour and it is essential to establish positive habits for children to secure a more environmentally-friendly future. To minimize the gap between attitude, knowledge and actual contribution, it is important that environmental education starts early on. The Kidnetic is a rechargeable power bank that functions with kinetic energy in order to increase a child's abilities to conceptualize the production of sustainable energy. This portable device allows children to move, play, and run - creating a system of self- sufficiency to power their own mobile devices. The design is aimed to enhance children's curiosity and engagement in environmental conservation and awareness. Kidnetic argues for the importance of forging a deeper connection between a mechanism and the user by showing how a design is capable of spreading awareness for energy consumption and changing children's behaviour toward a sustainable lifestyle.

  • 39. Reynolds, Rebecca
    et al.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Inter-Disciplinary Research on Inquiry and Learning: Information and Learning Sciences Perspectives2018In: Proceedings of the 2018 Conference on Human Information Interaction & Retrieval, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 289-292Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes conceptual, technological and information environmental terrain across which scholarship in the inter-related disciplines of information and learning sciences occurs. The aim is to encourage researchers across these fields to find one another's work, as we engage in ongoing theory-building around inquiry and learning phenomena, to enrich scholarship and pragmatic design of learning innovations across both domains.

  • 40. Rieh, Soo Young
    et al.
    Collins-Thompson, Kevyn
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lee, Hye-Jung
    Towards searching as a learning process: a review of current perspectives and future directions2016In: Journal of information science, ISSN 0165-5515, E-ISSN 1741-6485, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 19-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We critically review literature on the association between searching and learning and contribute to the formulation of a research agenda for searching as learning. The paper begins by reviewing current literature that tends to characterize search systems as tools for learning. We then present a perspective on searching as learning that focuses on the learning that occurs during the search process, as well as search outputs and learning outcomes. The concept of comprehensive search' is proposed to describe iterative, reflective and integrative search sessions that facilitate critical and creative learning beyond receptive learning. We also discuss how search interaction data can provide a rich source of implicit and explicit features through which to assess search-related learning. In conclusion, we summarize opportunities and challenges for future research with respect to four agendas: developing a search system that supports sense-making and enhances learning; supporting effective user interaction for searching as learning; providing an inquiry-based literacy tool within a search system; and assessing learning from online searching behaviour.

  • 41. Shah, Chirag
    et al.
    Capra, Rob
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Research agenda for social and collaborative information seeking2017In: Library & Information Science Research, ISSN 0740-8188, E-ISSN 1873-1848, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 140-146Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars in diverse fields of inquiry have identified the need to expand individual-based information seeking and behavior models and systems to incorporate social as well as collaborative dimensions. However, the research areas of Social Information Seeking (SIS) and Collaborative Information Seeking (CIS) have been largely disconnected from one another despite a few notable attempts to study them under one umbrella. Researchers in these communities have recently realized the value of bringing SIS and CIS together for two main reasons: often it is impossible to separate social and collaborative dimensions in a project; and by considering these two aspects of information seeking, we may be able to support human information behavior in ways not previously possible. A brief synthesis of work in the domains of SIS and CIS is presented here. Then, an integrated view is presented to consider Social and Collaborative Information Seeking (SCIS) as an intersection and extension of SIS and CIS. Benefits of this approach are discussed and the integrated view is used as the basis to present a research agenda that outlines opportunities and challenges unique to SCIS.

  • 42. Shah, Chirag
    et al.
    Capra, Rob
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Workshop on Social and Collaborative Information Seeking (SCIS)2015In: SIGIR Forum, ISSN 0163-5840, E-ISSN 1558-0229, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 117-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a report from the Workshop on Social and Collaborative Information Seeking (SCIS), held on May 14-15, 2015 at Rutgers University. Twenty-eight participants contributed to the workshop in the form of short talks and work sessions. Outcomes from the workshop include a "research roadmap" of important future research needed in the area of social and collaborative search. The report presented here summarizes the short talks and the discussions that took place in six breakout groups. The report ends with pointers for future directions (research roadmap) and a few take-away points.

  • 43. Shah, Chirag
    et al.
    Capra, Robert
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Collaborative Information Seeking: [Guest editors' introduction]2014In: Computer, ISSN 0018-9162, E-ISSN 1558-0814, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 22-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People often engage in collaborative information seeking to achieve common goals, enlist expertise, increase the scope of what can be searched, and even simply to help others. In today's era of increased user-generated content and online sharing, computer and information scientists have a renewed interest in collaborative information seeking as an exciting area of research and development, with applications that range from education to e-commerce, with implications for areas that range from libraries to legal informatics. The Web extra at http://youtu.be/CXnNut7hKsU is a video in which proponents of collaborative information seeking discuss why supporting people's innate behavior and the need for working together while seeking and using information are important to computer science. Featured speakers include Chirag Shah, Rob Capra, Madhu Reddy, Meredith Ringel Morris, Roberto González-Ibáñez, and Michael B. Twidale.

  • 44. Shen, Danni
    et al.
    Chai, Chunlei
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ruan, Weiyu
    Research on Product Gender Inclination Based on FAHP: A Case Study on Watch Appearance2018In: 2018 10th International Conference on Intelligent Human-Machine Systems and Cybernetics (IHMSC): Proceedings, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2018, p. 239-242Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Products with gender inclination are generally attractive to specific consumers. This paper explored influence of product elements on gender inclination by using watches as a case study. We adopt morphological analysis to divide the appearance of a watch into five elements with several types, and then obtained element-wise gender inclination through a questionnaire survey. Next, we adopted fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (FAHP) to quantify the relative importance of the five elements as well as their types on gender inclinations. To verify the quantitive results of FAHP, we selected several types with obvious gender inclinations to construct five virtual watches, and performed a validation questionnaire based on the virtual watches. It was found that the validation results were consistent with those of FAHP, meaning that FAHP can provide a relatively more quantitive reference for designers and manufactures to examine the gender inclination of products.

  • 45. Sun, Lingyun
    et al.
    Zhou, Yunzhan
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Geng, Weidong
    Li, Xiangdong
    Cross-objects user interfaces for video interaction in virtual reality museum context2018In: Multimedia tools and applications, ISSN 1380-7501, E-ISSN 1573-7721, Vol. 77, no 21, p. 29013-29041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Museums are good places for learning and nowadays many museums are integrating digital media such as video and increasingly moving towards using virtual reality. In the physical world people used to seek information from object surfaces e.g. posters on the wall and this has been used as a metaphor in the virtual reality museum: numerous videos were inhabited within virtual objects and shaped cross-objects user interfaces (COUIs). However, how such interfaces perform for video interactions still needs more investigations. In this study we implemented and investigated COUIs in comparison with the conventional card-style user interfaces and the plain virtual reality user interfaces in the virtual reality museum. The results reported no significant differences in the perceived usability or learning experience between these user interfaces, except the COUIs had a lower level of satisfaction than the card-style user interfaces. However, the COUIs showed greater efficiency with shorter eye fixation durations and higher saccade frequencies, and within these COUIs instances, namely the fully-detached, semi-attached, and fully-attached COUIs, the fully-attached instance was closest to the form of interacting with physical object surfaces and it reported highest efficiency as well. Rationales behind these results and implications generalising for the future design of COUIs, are discussed.

  • 46. Wang, Yanan
    et al.
    Lou, Shijian
    Gong, Hebo
    Xu, Fei
    Chen, Ruija
    Liu, Shuai
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    SKIN+: Fabricating Soft Fluidic User Interfaces for Enhancing On-Skin Experiences and Interactions2018In: CHI EA '18, Extended Abstracts of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, article id LBW111Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human skin is the largest organ on our body not only senses and external environment. A growing number of researchers devote themselves to design seamless interfaces directly on skin. In this late-breaking work, we propose a novel way for creating dynamic 2.5D skin textures, called SKIN+, a soft fluidic mini-scale user interface by introducing fluidic actuation. We have created four swatches with different pre-defined textures, topologies and structures to explore how this fluidic actuation system can benefit on-skin experiences and interactions. Our work details the intriguing experiences and interactions and future applications of on-skin wearables. Our work also extends the expressiveness, aesthetics and design space of soft fluidic interface as skin decoration and beauty technology.

  • 47. Wang, Yanan
    et al.
    Luo, Shijian
    Liu, Shuai
    Lu, Yuija
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Crafting Concrete as a Material for Enhancing Meaningful Interactions2017In: Human-Computer Interaction. User Interface Design, Development and Multimodality: Proceedings, Part I / [ed] Masaaki Kurosu, Springer, 2017, p. 634-644Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concrete is a composite material mostly used for the buildings and road surfaces ever since early human history, and which also can be used in contemporary product design as its unique aesthetic properties. In this paper, we present a series of small-scale explorations of concrete crafted as a central material, first utilizing its hygroscopicity interacting as an ephemeral and dynamic display; and secondly eliciting tactile interaction for its unique surface textures. Through hands-on engagement to unveil concrete potential when fabricated with digital technologies, we discuss how this large-scale and ubiquitous material could bring particular and intriguing experiences in our everyday lives, most importantly how can the potential of concrete be framed and described and enhance meaningful concrete reflections within HCI community.

  • 48. Wang, Yanan
    et al.
    Luo, Shijian
    Lu, Yujia
    Gong, Hebo
    Zhou, Yexing
    Liu, Shuai
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    AnimSkin: Fabricating Epidermis with Interactive, Functional and Aesthetic Color Animation2017In: Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Designing Interactive Systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2017, p. 397-401Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human epidermis, as the largest organ on body, has become a new design platform for wearable computing. The availability of miniature electronics makes more possibilities for on-skin designs. In this paper, we present AnimSkin, a thin-film interface, which will emit dynamic color animations directly on skin. This is done by using thermochromic material embedded with transparent electrode acting as a capacitive sensor. Moreover, an accessible and low-cost fabrication method is introduced. Individuals could also customize aesthetic graphic designs by following the detailed fabrication process to achieve personalized patterns. We propose four different dynamic types of color animation by applying certain voltage to the heating circuitry. With two examples, Email Reminder and Light Control System, we demonstrate how AnimSkin can be integrated into everyday life, and specifically, we show how AnimSkin can benefit areas such as on-skin design, thin-film interface and beauty technology.

  • 49.
    Wettergren, Gunnar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Boström, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nenzén, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Perjons, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Framework for implementation of learning analytics projects in higher education2014In: DSV writers hut 2014: proceedings, Stockholm: Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University , 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 50. Wilson, Max L.
    et al.
    Larsen, Birger
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Norling, Kristian
    Russell-Rose, Tony
    EuroHCIR2013 - the 3rd European Workshop on Human- Computer Interaction and Information Retrieval2013In: Proceedings of the 36th international ACM SIGIR conference on Research and development in information retrieval, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 1139-1139Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of EuroHCIR is to push the agenda of understanding the role that HCI has with IR systems, beyond Interactive IR. Alongside the popular American HCIR series, EuroHCIR aims to stimulate this focus in the large European community. While the previous two workshops have taken place at more HCI focused conferences (BCS-HCI and IIiX2012), the particular purpose of running EuroHCIR2013 at SIGIR2013 is to better engage with the core IR community, on extended search scenarios like holiday planning, entertainment, and casual browsing.

12 1 - 50 of 55
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf