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  • 1.
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed F.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Shatskiy, Andrey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Laine, Tanja M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Arafa, Wael A. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. University Fayoum, Egypt.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Bjorn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Chemical and Photochemical Water Oxidation Mediated by an Efficient Single-Site Ruthenium Catalyst2016In: ChemSusChem, ISSN 1864-5631, E-ISSN 1864-564X, Vol. 9, no 24, 3448-3456 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water oxidation is a fundamental step in artificial photosynthesis for solar fuels production. In this study, we report a single-site Ru-based water oxidation catalyst, housing a dicarboxylate-benzimidazole ligand, that mediates both chemical and light-driven oxidation of water efficiently under neutral conditions. The importance of the incorporation of the negatively charged ligand framework is manifested in the low redox potentials of the developed complex, which allows water oxidation to be driven by the mild one-electron oxidant [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine). Furthermore, combined experimental and DFT studies provide insight into the mechanistic details of the catalytic cycle.

  • 2.
    Arafa, Wael A. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lee, Bao-Lin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Berends, Hans-Martin
    Messinger, Johannes
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Dinuclear manganese complexes for water oxidation: evaluation of electronic effects and catalytic activity2014In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 16, no 24, 11950-11964 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During recent years significant progress has been made towards the realization of a sustainable and carbon-neutral energy economy. One promising approach is photochemical splitting of H2O into O-2 and solar fuels, such as H-2. However, the bottleneck in such artificial photosynthetic schemes is the H2O oxidation half reaction where more efficient catalysts are required that lower the kinetic barrier for this process. In particular catalysts based on earth-abundant metals are highly attractive compared to catalysts comprised of noble metals. We have now synthesized a library of dinuclear Mn-2 (II,III) catalysts for H2O oxidation and studied how the incorporation of different substituents affected the electronics and catalytic efficiency. It was found that the incorporation of a distal carboxyl group into the ligand scaffold resulted in a catalyst with increased catalytic activity, most likely because of the fact that the distal group is able to promote proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) from the high-valent Mn species, thus facilitating O-O bond formation.

  • 3.
    Bassan, Arianna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Borowski, Tomasz
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Oxygen Activation by Rieske Non-Heme Iron Oxygenases, a Theoretical Insight2004In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 108, no 34, 13031-13041 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first steps of dioxygen activation in naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase have been investigated by means of hybrid density functional theory. Reduction of molecular oxygen by this Rieske dioxygenase occurs in the catalytic domain accommodating a mononuclear non-heme iron(II) complex, and it requires two external electrons ultimately delivered by a Rieske [2Fe−2S] cluster hosted in the neighboring domain. Theoretical tools have been applied to gain insight into the O2-binding step and into the first one-electron-transfer process involving the mononuclear and the Rieske centers, and yielding an iron(II)−superoxo intermediate. The reaction, which is mimicked with a model including both metal sites, is found to be a reversible equilibrium. Although the entropic loss associated with the binding of O2 to iron(II) is not canceled by the corresponding enthalpic binding energy, it is, however, balanced by the exothermicity of the electron transfer process from the Rieske cluster to the dioxygen-bound iron(II) complex. The rationalization for the calculated energetics is related to the values of the ionization potential (IP) of the Rieske cluster and the electron affinity (EA) of the mononuclear iron complex: the latter is computed to be higher than the former, when dioxygen is bound to the metal. The possibility that a second external electron is delivered to the mononuclear site before dioxygenation of the substrate has also been examined. It is shown that, if the second electron is available in the Rieske domain, the electron transfer process is energetically favored. The results acquired with the large model comprising the two metal centers are compared to the corresponding information collected from the study of smaller models, where either the mononuclear iron complex or the Rieske cluster is included.

  • 4.
    Bassan, Arianna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    A Theoretical Study of the Cis-Dihydroxylation Mechanism in Naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase2004In: Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0949-8257, E-ISSN 1432-1327, Vol. 9, no 4, 439-452 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The catalytic mechanism of naphthalene 1,2-dioxygenase has been investigated by means of hybrid density functional theory. This Rieske-type enzyme, which contains an active site hosting a mononuclear non-heme iron(II) complex, uses dioxygen and two electrons provided by NADH to carry out the cis-dihydroxylation of naphthalene. Since a (hydro)peroxo-iron(III) moiety has been proposed to be involved in the catalytic cycle, it was probed whether and how this species is capable of cis-dihydroxylation of the aromatic substrate. Different oxidation and protonation states of the Fe–O2 complex were studied on the basis of the crystal structure of the enzyme with oxygen bound side-on to iron. It was found that feasible reaction pathways require a protonated peroxo ligand, FeIII–OOH; the deprotonated species, the peroxo-iron(III) complex, was found to be inert toward naphthalene. Among the different chemical patterns which have been explored, the most accessible one involves an epoxide intermediate, which may subsequently evolve toward an arene cation, and finally to the cis-diol. The possibility that an iron(V)-oxo species is formed prior to substrate hydroxylation was also examined, but found to implicate a rather high energy barrier. In contrast, a reasonably low barrier might lead to a high-valent iron-oxo species [i.e. iron(IV)-oxo] if a second external electron is supplied to the mononuclear iron center before dioxygenation.

  • 5.
    Bassan, Arianna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Mechanism of Aromatic Hydroxylation by an Activated Fe(IV)=O Core in Tetrahydrobiopterin-Dependent Hydroxylases2003In: Chemistry: a European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, Vol. 9, no 17, 4055-4067 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bassan, Arianna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Mechanism of Dioxygen Cleavage in Tetrahydrobiopterin-Dependent Amino Acid Hydroxylases2003In: Chemistry: a European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, Vol. 9, no 1, 106-115 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Bassan, Arianna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Que, Jr, Lawrence
    A Density Functional Study of a Biomimetic Non-Heme Iron Catalyst: Insights into Alkane Hydroxylation and Olefin Oxidation by a Formally HO-Fe(V)=O Oxidant2004In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 11, no 2, 692-705 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The reactivity of [HO(tpa)FeVO] (TPA=tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine), derived from OO bond heterolysis of its [H2O(tpa)FeIIIOOH] precursor, was explored by means of hybrid density functional theory. The mechanism for alkane hydroxylation by the high-valent iron–oxo species invoked as an intermediate in Fe(tpa)/H2O2 catalysis was investigated. Hydroxylation of methane and propane by HOFeVO was studied by following the rebound mechanism associated with the heme center of cytochrome P450, and it is demonstrated that this species is capable of stereospecific alkane hydroxylation. The mechanism proposed for alkane hydroxylation by HOFeVO accounts for the experimentally observed incorporation of solvent water into the products. An investigation of the possible hydroxylation of acetonitrile (i.e., the solvent used in the experiments) shows that the activation energy for hydrogen-atom abstraction by HOFeVO is rather high and, in fact, rather similar to that of methane, despite the similarity of the HCH2CN bond strength to that of the secondary CH bond in propane. This result indicates that the kinetics of hydrogen-atom abstraction are strongly affected by the cyano group and rationalizes the lack of experimental evidence for solvent hydroxylation in competition with that of substrates such as cyclohexane.

  • 8.
    Bassan, Arianna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Que, Jr., Lawrence
    Theoretical Studies on Olefin Oxidation by Biomimetic Non-Heme Iron(III)-Hydroperoxo ComplexesManuscript (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Blomberg, L. Mattias
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Blomberg, Margareta R.A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per E.M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Reduction of Nitric Oxide in Bacterial Nitric Oxide Reductase: A Theoretical Model Study2006In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1757, no 4, 240-252 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanism of the nitric oxide reduction in a bacterial nitric oxide reductase (NOR) has been investigated in two model systems of the heme-b3-FeB active site using density functional theory (B3LYP). A model with an octahedral coordination of the non-heme FeB consisting of three histidines, one glutamate and one water molecule gave an energetically feasible reaction mechanism. A tetrahedral coordination of the non-heme iron, corresponding to the one of CuB in cytochrome oxidase, gave several very high barriers which makes this type of coordination unlikely. The first nitric oxide coordinates to heme b3 and is partly reduced to a more nitroxyl anion character, which activates it toward an attack from the second NO. The product in this reaction step is a hyponitrite dianion coordinating in between the two irons. Cleaving an NO bond in this intermediate forms an FeB (IV)O and nitrous oxide, and this is the rate determining step in the reaction mechanism. In the model with an octahedral coordination of FeB the intrinsic barrier of this step is 16.3 kcal/mol, which is in good agreement with the experimental value of 15.9 kcal/mol. However, the total barrier is 21.3 kcal/mol, mainly due to the endergonic reduction of heme b3 taken from experimental reduction potentials. After nitrous oxide has left the active site the ferrylic FeB will form a μ-oxo bridge to heme b3 in a reaction step exergonic by 45.3 kcal/mol. The formation of a quite stable μ-oxo bridge between heme b3 and FeB is in agreement with this intermediate being the experimentally observed resting state in oxidized NOR. The formation of a ferrylic non-heme FeB in the proposed reaction mechanism could be one reason for having an iron as the non-heme metal ion in NOR instead of a Cu as in cytochrome oxidase.

  • 10.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Borowski, Tomasz
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Quantum Chemical Studies of Mechanisms for Metalloenzymes2014In: Chemical Reviews, ISSN 0009-2665, E-ISSN 1520-6890, Vol. 114, no 7, 3601-3658 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    A quantum chemical study of the mechanism for proton-coupled electron transfer leading to proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase2010In: Molecular Physics, ISSN 0026-8976, E-ISSN 1362-3028, Vol. 108, no 19-20, 2733-2743 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The proton pumping mechanism in cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal enzyme in the respiratory chain, has been investigated using hybrid DFT with large chemical models. In previous studies, a gating mechanism was suggested based on electrostatic interpretations of kinetic experiments. The predictions from that analysis are tested here. The main result is that the suggestion of a positively charged transition state for proton transfer is confirmed, while some other suggestions for the gating are not supported. It is shown that a few critical relative energy values from the earlier studies are reproduced with quite high accuracy using the present model calculations. Examples are the forward barrier for proton transfer from the N-side of the membrane to the pump-loading site when the heme a cofactor is reduced, and the corresponding back leakage barrier when heme a is oxidised. An interesting new finding is an unexpected double-well potential for proton transfer from the N-side to the pump-loading site. In the intermediate between the two transition states found, the proton is bound to PropD on heme a. A possible purpose of this type of potential surface is suggested here. The accuracy of the present values are discussed in terms of their sensitivity to the choice of dielectric constant. Only one energy value, which is not critical for the present mechanism, varies significantly with this choice and is therefore less certain.

  • 12.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    How cytochrome c oxidase can pump four protons per oxygen molecule at high electrochemical gradient2015In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1847, no 3, 364-376 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experiments have shown that the A-family cytochrome c oxidases pump four protons per oxygen molecule, also at a high electrochemical gradient. This has been considered a puzzle, since two of the reduction potentials involved, Cu(II) and Fe(III), were estimated from experiments to be too low to afford proton pumping at a high gradient The present quantum mechanical study (using hybrid density functional theory) suggests a solution to this puzzle. First, the calculations show that the charge compensated Cu(II) potential for Cu-B is actually much higher than estimated from experiment, of the same order as the reduction potentials for the tyrosyl radical and the ferryl group, which are also involved in the catalytic cycle. The reason for the discrepancy between theory and experiment is the very large uncertainty in the experimental observations used to estimate the equilibrium potentials, mainly caused by the lack of methods for direct determination of reduced Cu-B. Second, the calculations show that a high energy metastable state, labeled E-H, is involved during catalytic turnover. The E-H state mixes the low reduction potential of Fe(III) in heme a(3) with another, higher potential, here suggested to be that of the tyrosyl radical, resulting in enough exergonicity to allow proton pumping at a high gradient In contrast, the corresponding metastable oxidized state, O-H, is not significantly higher in energy than the resting state, O. Finally, to secure the involvement of the high energy E-H state it is suggested that only one proton is taken up via the K-channel during catalytic turnover.

  • 13.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Improved free energy profile for reduction of NO in cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR)2016In: Journal of Computational Chemistry, ISSN 0192-8651, E-ISSN 1096-987X, Vol. 37, no 19, 1810-1818 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantum chemical calculations play an essential role in the elucidation of reaction mechanisms for redox-active metalloenzymes. For example, the cleavage and the formation of covalent bonds can usually not be described only on the basis of experimental information, but can be followed by the calculations. Conversely, there are properties, like reduction potentials, which cannot be accurately calculated. Therefore, computational and experimental data has to be carefully combined to obtain reliable descriptions of entire catalytic cycles involving electron and proton uptake from donors outside the enzyme. Such a procedure is illustrated here, for the reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide and water in the membrane enzyme, cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR). A surprising experimental observation is that this reaction is nonelectrogenic, which means that no energy is conserved. On the basis of hybrid density functional calculations a free energy profile for the entire catalytic cycle is obtained, which agrees much better with experimental information on the active site reduction potentials than previous ones. Most importantly the energy profile shows that the reduction steps are endergonic and that the entire process is rate-limited by high proton uptake barriers during the reduction steps. This result implies that, if the reaction were electrogenic, it would become too slow when the gradient is present across the membrane. This explains why this enzyme does not conserve any of the free energy released.

  • 14.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase: Energetic requirements and the role of two proton channels2014In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1837, no 7, 1165-1177 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytochrome c oxidase is a superfamily of membrane bound enzymes catalyzing the exergonic reduction of molecular oxygen to water, producing an electrochemical gradient across the membrane. The gradient is formed both by the electrogenic chemistry, taking electrons and protons from opposite sides of the membrane, and by proton pumping across the entire membrane. In the most efficient subfamily, the A-family of oxidases, one proton is pumped in each reduction step, which is surprising considering the fact that two of the reduction steps most likely are only weakly exergonic. Based on a combination of quantum chemical calculations and experimental information, it is here shown that from both a thermodynamic and a kinetic point of view, it should be possible to pump one proton per electron also with such an uneven distribution of the free energy release over the reduction steps, at least up to half the maximum gradient. A previously suggested pumping mechanism is developed further to suggest a reason for the use of two proton transfer channels in the A-family. Since the rate of proton transfer to the binuclear center through the D-channel is redox dependent, it might become too slow for the steps with low exergonicity. Therefore, a second channel, the K-channel, where the rate is redox-independent is needed. A redox-dependent leakage possibility is also suggested, which might be important for efficient energy conservation at a high gradient. A mechanism for the variation in proton pumping stoichiometry over the different subfamilies of cytochrome oxidase is also suggested. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference.

  • 15.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Protonation of the binuclear active site in cytochrome c oxidase decreases the reduction potential of Cu-B2015In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1847, no 10, 1173-1180 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the remaining mysteries regarding the respiratory enzyme cytochrome c oxidase is how proton pumping can occur in all reduction steps in spite of the low reduction potentials observed in equilibrium titration experiments for two of the active site cofactors, CUB(II) and Fe-a3(III). It has been speculated that, at least the copper cofactor can acquire two different states, one metastable activated state occurring during enzyme turnover, and one relaxed state with lower energy, reached only when the supply of electrons stops. The activated state should have a transiently increased Cu-B(II) reduction potential, allowing proton pumping. The relaxed state should have a lower reduction potential, as measured in the titration experiments. However, the structures of these two states are not known. Quantum mechanical calculations show that the proton coupled reduction potential for Cu-B is inherently high in the active site as it appears after reaction with oxygen, which explains the observed proton pumping. It is suggested here that, when the flow of electrons ceases, a relaxed resting state is formed by the uptake of one extra proton, on top of the charge compensating protons delivered in each reduction step. The extra proton in the active site decreases the proton coupled reduction potential for Cu-B by almost half a volt, leading to agreement with titration experiments. Furthermore, the structure for the resting state with an extra proton is found to have a hydroxo-bridge between Cu-B(II) and Fe-a3(III), yielding a magnetic coupling that can explain the experimentally observed EPR silence.

  • 16.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Quantum chemistry as a tool in bioenergetics2010In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1797, no 2, 129-142 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent developments of quantum chemical methods have made it possible to tackle crucial questions in bioenergetics. The most important systems, cytochrome c oxidase in cellular respiration and photosystem II (PSII) in photosynthesis will here be used as examples to illustrate the power of the quantum chemical tools. One main contribution from quantum chemistry is to put mechanistic suggestions onto an energy scale. Accordingly, free energy profiles can be constructed both for reduction of molecular oxygen in cytochrome c oxidase and water oxidation in PSII, including O-O bond cleavage and formation, and also proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase. For the construction of the energy diagrams, the computational results sometimes have to be combined with experimental information, such as reduction potentials and rate constants for individual steps in the reactions.

  • 17.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    The mechanism for proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase from an electrostatic and quantum chemical perspective2012In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1817, no 4, 495-505 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanism for proton pumping in cytochrome c oxidase in the respiratory chain, has for decades been one of the main unsolved problems in biochemistry. However, even though several different suggested mechanisms exist, many of the steps in these mechanisms are quite similar and constitute a general consensus framework for discussing proton pumping. When these steps are analyzed, at least three critical gating situations are found, and these points are where the suggested mechanisms in general differ. The requirements for gating are reviewed and analyzed in detail, and a mechanism is suggested, where solutions for all the gating situations are formulated. This mechanism is based on an electrostatic analysis of a kinetic experiment for the O to E transition. The key component of the mechanism is a positively charged transition state. An electron on heme a opens the gate for proton transfer from the N-side to a pump loading site (PLS). When the negative charge of the electron is compensated by a chemical proton, the positive transition state prevents backflow from the PLS to the N-side at the most critical stage of the pumping process. The mechanism has now been tested by large model DFT calculations, and these calculations give strong support for the suggested mechanism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Respiratory Oxidases.

  • 18.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Why is the reduction of NO in cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR) not electrogenic?2013In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1827, no 7, 826-833 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The membrane-bound enzyme cNOR (cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase) catalyzes the reduction of NO in a non-electrogenic process. This is in contrast to the reduction of O-2 in cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), the other member of the heme-copper oxidase family, which stores energy by the generation of a membrane gradient. This difference between the two enzymes has not been understood, but it has been speculated to be of kinetic origin, since per electron the NO reduction is more exergonic than the O-2 reduction, and the energy should thus be enough for an electrogenic process. However, it has not been clear how and why electrogenicity, which mainly affects the thermodynamics, would slow down the very exergonic NO reduction. Quantum chemical calculations are used to construct a free energy profile for the catalytic reduction of NO in the active site of cNOR. The energy profile shows that the reduction of the NO molecules by the enzyme and the formation of N2O are very exergonic steps, making the rereduction of the enzyme endergonic and rate-limiting for the entire catalytic cycle. Therefore the NO reduction cannot be electrogenic, i.e. cannot take electrons and protons from the opposite sides of the membrane, since it would increase the endergonicity of the rereduction when the gradient is present, thereby increasing the rate-limiting barrier, and the reaction would become too slow. It also means that proton pumping coupled to electron transfer is not possible in cNOR In CcO the corresponding rereduction of the enzyme is very exergonic.

  • 19. Borowski, Thomasz
    et al.
    Noack, Holger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Radon, Mariusz
    Zych, Konrad
    Siegbahn, Per E.M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Mechanism of Selective Halogenation by SyrB2: A Computational Study2010In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 132, no 37, 12887-12898 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanism of the chlorination reaction of SyrB2, a representative α-ketoglutarate dependent halogenase, was studied with computational methods. First, a macromolecular model of the Michaelis com- plex was constructed using molecular docking proce- dures. Based on this structure a smaller model com- prising the first- and some of the second shell residues of iron, and a model substrate was constructed and used in DFT investigations on the reaction mecha- nism. Computed relative energies and Mo ̈ssbauer iso- mer shifts and quadrupole splittings indicate that the two oxoferryl species observed experimentally are two stereoisomers resulting from an exchange of the coordi- nation sites occupied by the oxo and chloro ligands. In principle both FeIV =O species are reactive and decay to FeIIICl(OH)/carbon radical intermediates via C-H bond cleavage. In the final rebound step, which is very fast and thus precluding equilibration between the two forms of the radical intermediate, the ligand (oxo or chloro) placed closest to the carbon radical (trans to His235) is transfered to the carbon. For the native substrate (L-Thr) the lowest barrier for C-H cleavage was found for an isomer of the oxoferryl species favor- ing chlorination in the rebound step. CASPT2 cal- culations for the spin state splittings in the oxoferryl species support the conclusion that once the FeIV =O intermediate is formed, the reaction proceeds on the quintet potential energy surface.

  • 20. Borowski, Tomasz
    et al.
    Georgiev, Valentin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    On the observation of a gem diol intermediate after O-O bond cleavage by extradiol dioxygenases. A hybrid DFT study2010In: Journal of Molecular Modeling, ISSN 1610-2940, E-ISSN 0948-5023, Vol. 16, no 11, 1673-1677 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Catalytic cycle intermediates of a representative extradiol dioxygenase, homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (HPCD), have recently been characterized in crystallo by Kovaleva and Lipscomb. The structures of the identified species indicate that the process of inserting oxygen into the catechol ring occurs stepwise, and involves an Fe(II)-alkylperoxo intermediate and its O-O cleavage product: a gem diol species. In general, these findings corroborate the results of our previous computational studies; however, the fact that the gem diol species is stable enough to be observed in the crystal form seems to be at odds with the computational mechanistic data, which suggest that this intermediate should very readily and spontaneously convert to the epoxide species. The key question then becomes what is actually observed in the X-ray experiments. Here we report additional computational studies undertaken with the hope of clarifying this issue. The results obtained for active site models hosting both the native and the alternative (4-sulfonylcatechol) substrate indicate that the stability of the gem diol species is substantially increased if an electron and a proton are added. If this occurs somehow, the lifetime of the intermediate should be sufficient to observe it.

  • 21.
    Borowski, Tomasz
    et al.
    Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences.
    Georgiev, Valentin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per E.M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Catalytic Reaction Mechanism of Homogentisate Dioxygenase: A Hybrid DFT Study2005In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 127, no 49, 17303-17314 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22. Borowski, Tomasz
    et al.
    Wojcik, Anna
    Milaczewska, Anna
    Georgiev, Valentin
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    The alkenyl migration mechanism catalyzed by extradiol dioxygenases: a hybrid dft study2012In: Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0949-8257, E-ISSN 1432-1327, Vol. 17, no 6, 881-890 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    6-Hydroxymethyl-6-methylcyclohexa-2,4-dienone is a mechanistic probe which when incubated with an extradiol dioxygenase yields a 2-tropolone product. This observation was originally interpreted as evidence supporting a direct heterolytic 1,2-alkenyl migration mechanism for a ring expansion reaction catalyzed by this class of Fe(II)-dependent nonheme enzymes (Xin and Bugg in J Am Chem Soc 130:10422-10430, 2008). In the work reported in this contribution we used quantum chemical methods to test whether such a mechanism is energetically possible and we found that it is not, neither for the mechanistic probe nor for the native catalytic cycle intermediate. Models of increasing complexity were used to calculate energy barriers to the heterolytic 1,2-alkenyl migration and alternative radical mechanisms. It was found that the former involves substantially higher barriers than the latter. A tentative radical mechanism that accounts for the transformation of the probe substrate to 2-tropolone was also proposed, and it involves acceptable barriers.

  • 23. Brena, Barbara
    et al.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Agren, Hans
    Modeling Near-Edge Fine Structure X-ray Spectra of the Manganese Catalytic Site for Water Oxidation in Photosystem II2012In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 134, no 41, 17157-17167 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mn Is near-edge absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) has been computed by means of transition-state gradient-corrected density functional theory (DFT) on four Mn4Ca clusters modeling the successive S-0 to S-3 steps of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosystem II (PSII). The model clusters were obtained from a previous theoretical study where they were determined by energy minimization. They are composed of Mn(III) and Mn(IV) atoms, progressing from Mn(III)(3)Mn(IV) for S-0 to Mn(III)(2)Mn(IV)(2) for S-1 to Mn(III)Mn(IV)(3) for S-2 to Mn(IV)(4) for S-3, implying an Mn-centered oxidation during each step of the photosynthetic oxygen evolution. The DFT simulations of the Mn Is absorption edge reproduce the experimentally measured curves quite well. By the half-height method, the theoretical IPEs are shifted by 0.93 eV for the S-0 -> S-1 transition, by 1.43 eV for the S-1 -> S-2 transition, and by 0.63 eV for the S-2 -> S-3 transition. The inflection point energy (IPE) shifts depend strongly on the method used to determine them, and the most interesting result is that the present clusters reproduce the shift in the S-2 -> S-3 transition obtained by both the half-height and second-derivative methods, thus giving strong support to the previously suggested structures and assignments.

  • 24. Chen, Shi-Lu
    et al.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    An investigation of possible competing mechanisms for Ni-containing methyl-coenzyme M reductase2014In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 16, no 27, 14029-14035 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ni-containing methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) is capable of catalyzing methane formation from methyl-coenzyme M (CH3-SCoM) and coenzyme B (CoB-SH), and also its reverse reaction (methane oxidation). Based on extensive experimental and theoretical investigations, it has turned out that a mechanism including an organometallic methyl-Ni(III)F-430 intermediate is inaccessible, while another mechanism involving a methyl radical and a Ni(II)-SCoM species currently appears to be the most acceptable one for MCR. In the present paper, using hybrid density functional theory and an active-site model based on the X-ray crystal structure, two other mechanisms were studied and finally also ruled out. One of them, involving proton binding on the CH3-SCoM substrate, which should facilitate methyl-Ni(III)F-430 formation, is demonstrated to be quite unfavorable since the substrate has a much smaller proton affinity than the F-430 cofactor. Another one (oxidative addition mechanism) is also shown to be unfavorable for the MCR reaction, due to the large endothermicity for the formation of the ternary intermediate with side-on C-S (for CH3-SCoM) or C-H (for methane) coordination to Ni.

  • 25.
    Chen, Shi-Lu
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    How Is a Co-Methyl Intermediate Formed in the Reaction of Cobalamin-Dependent Methionine Synthase?: Theoretical Evidence for a Two-Step Methyl Cation Transfer Mechanism2011In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 115, no 14, 4066-4077 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A methyl-Co(cobalamin) species has been characterized to be a crucial intermediate in the last step of the de novo biosynthesis of methionine catalyzed by cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH). However, exactly how it is formed is still an open question. In the present article, the formation of the methyl-Co(cobalamin) species in MetH has been investigated with B3LYP* hybrid DFT including van der Waals (vdW) interactions (i.e., dispersion) and using a chemical model built on X-ray crystal structures. The methyl cation and radical transfer mechanisms have been examined in various protonation states. The calculations reveal that the CH(3)-Co(III)(cobalamin) formation in MetH proceeds along a stepwise pathway, where the first step is a methyl cation transfer from the protonated methyltetrahydrofolate (CH(3)-THF) substrate to the Co(I)cobalamin. The second step is a binding of His759 to the other side (a-face) of Co. The former methyl transfer is computed to be the rate-limiting step with a barrier of 18 kcal/mol, which is reduced to 13 kcal/mol when dispersion is included. For the first step, the protonation at the methyl-bound nitrogen of CH(3)-THF is very important. The methyl transfer is otherwise unreachable with a very high barrier of similar to 38 kcal/mol. The deprotonation of the alpha-face His759-Asp757-Ser810 triad is found to be much less significant but slightly facilitates the CH(3)-Co(III)Cbl formation. There has been a long-standing discrepancy of 10-20 kcal/mol between theory and experiment in previous B3LYP computations of the Co C bond dissociation energy for the methyl-Co(cobalamin) species. The calculations indicate that the lack of dispersion (similar to 11 kcal/mol) is the main origin of this puzzling problem. With these effects, B3LYP* gives a bond strength of 32 kcal/mol compared to the experimental value of 37 +/- 3 kcal/mol. Overall, the present calculations give many examples of dispersion that makes non-negligible contributions to the energetics of enzyme reactions, especially for systems involving at least one large reacting fragment approaching or departing.

  • 26. Chen, Shi-Lu
    et al.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    How Is Methane Formed and Oxidized Reversibly When Catalyzed by Ni-Containing Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase?2012In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 18, no 20, 6309-6315 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ni-containing methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) is capable of catalyzing methane formation and has recently been observed to also be able to catalyze the reverse reaction, the anaerobic oxidation of methane. The forward reaction has been extensively studied theoretically before and was found to consist of two steps. The first step is rate-limiting and the second step was therefore treated at a lower level. For an accurate treatment of the reverse reaction, both steps have to be studied at the same level. In the present paper, the mechanisms for the reversible formation and oxidation of methane catalyzed by MCR have been investigated using hybrid density functional theory with recent developments, in particular including dispersion effects. An active-site model was constructed based on the X-ray crystal structure. The calculations indicate that the MCR reaction is indeed reversible and proceeds via a methyl radical and a Ni-S(CoM) intermediate with reasonable reaction barriers in both directions. In a competing mechanism, the formation of the crucial Ni-methyl intermediate, was found to be strongly endergonic by over 20 kcal?mol-1 (including a barrier) with dispersion and entropy effects considered, and thus would not be reachable in a reasonable time under natural conditions.

  • 27.
    Chen, Shi-Lu
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Pelmenschikov, Vladimir
    Blomberg, Margareta R.A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per .E.M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Is There a Ni-Methyl Intermediate in the Mechanism of Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase (MCR)?2009In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 131, 9912-9913 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28. Das, Biswanath
    et al.
    Lee, Bao-Lin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Karlsson, Erik A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Shatskiy, Andrey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Demeshko, Serhiy
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Laine, Tanja M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Haukka, Matti
    Zeglio, Erica
    Abdel-Magied, Ahmed F.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Meyer, Franc
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johnston, Eric V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nordlander, Ebbe
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Water oxidation catalyzed by molecular di- and nonanuclear Fe complexes: importance of a proper ligand framework2016In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 45, no 34, 13289-13293 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis of two molecular iron complexes, a dinuclear iron(III,III) complex and a nonanuclear iron complex, based on the di-nucleating ligand 2,2'-(2-hydroxy-5-methyl-1,3-phenylene)bis(1H-benzo[d]imidazole-4-carboxylic acid) is described. The two iron complexes were found to drive the oxidation of water by the one-electron oxidant [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+).

  • 29. Ertem, Mehmed Z.
    et al.
    Cramer, Christopher J.
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    N-O bond cleavage mechanism(s) in nitrous oxide reductase2012In: Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0949-8257, E-ISSN 1432-1327, Vol. 17, no 5, 687-698 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantum chemical calculations of active-site models of nitrous oxide reductase (N2OR) have been undertaken to elucidate the mechanism of N-O bond cleavage mediated by the supported tetranuclear Cu4S core (Cu-Z) found in the enzymatic active site. Using either a minimal model previously employed by Gorelsky et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128:278-290, 2006) or a more extended model including key residue side chains in the active-site second shell, we found two distinct mechanisms. In the first model, N2O binds to the fully reduced Cu-Z in a bent mu-(1,3)-O,N bridging fashion between the Cu-I and Cu-IV centers and subsequently extrudes N-2 while generating the corresponding bridged mu-oxo species. In the second model, substrate N2O binds loosely to one of the coppers of Cu-Z in a terminal fashion, i.e., using only the oxygen atom; loss of N-2 generates the same mu-oxo copper core. The free energies of activation predicted for these two alternative pathways are sufficiently close to one another that theory does not provide decisive support for one over the other, posing an interesting problem with respect to experiments that might be designed to distinguish between the two. Effects of nearby residues and active-site water molecules are also explored.

  • 30.
    Georgiev, Valentin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Borowski, Tomasz
    Polish Academy of Sciences.
    Blomberg, Margareta R.A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per E.M.
    A comparison of the reaction mechanisms of iron- and manganese-containing 2,3-HPCD: an important spin transition for manganese2008In: Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0949-8257, E-ISSN 1432-1327, Vol. 13, no 6, 929-40 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Homoprotocatechuate (HPCA) dioxygenases are enzymes that take part in the catabolism of aromatic compounds in the environment. They use molecular oxygen to perform the ring cleavage of ortho-dihydroxylated aromatic compounds. A theoretical investigation of the catalytic cycle for HPCA 2,3-dioxygenase isolated from Brevibacterium fuscum (Bf 2,3-HPCD) was performed using hybrid DFT with the B3LYP functional, and a reaction mechanism is suggested. Models of different sizes were built from the crystal structure of the enzyme and were used in the search for intermediates and transition states. It was found that the enzyme follows a reaction pathway similar to that for other non-heme iron dioxygenases, and for the manganese-dependent analog MndD, although with different energetics. The computational results suggest that the rate-limiting step for the whole reaction of Bf 2,3-HPCD is the protonation of the activated oxygen, with an energy barrier of 17.4 kcal/mol, in good agreement with the experimental value of 16 kcal/mol obtained from the overall rate of the reaction. Surprisingly, a very low barrier was found for the O-O bond cleavage step, 11.3 kcal/mol, as compared to 21.8 kcal/mol for MndD (sextet spin state). This result motivated additional studies of the manganese-dependent enzyme. Different spin coupling between the unpaired electrons on the metal and on the evolving substrate radical was observed for the two enzymes, and therefore the quartet spin state potential energy surface of the MndD reaction was studied. The calculations show a crossing between the sextet and the quartet surfaces, and it was concluded that a spin transition occurs and determines a barrier of 14.4 kcal/mol for the O-O bond cleavage, which is found to be the rate-limiting step in MndD. Thus the two 83% identical enzymes, using different metal ions as co-factors, were found to have similar activation energies (in agreement with experiment), but different rate-limiting steps.

  • 31.
    Georgiev, Valentin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Borowski, Tomasz
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per E.M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Theoretical study of the catalytic reaction mechanism of MndD2006In: Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0949-8257, E-ISSN 1432-1327, Vol. 11, no 5, 571-85 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manganese-dependent homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (MndD) is an enzyme taking part in the catabolism of aromatic compounds in the environment. It uses molecular oxygen to perform an extradiol cleavage of the ring of the ortho-dihydroxylated aromatic compound homoprotocatechuate. A theoretical investigation of the reaction path for MndD was performed using hybrid density functional theory with the B3LYP functional, and a catalytic mechanism has been suggested. Models of different size were built from the crystal structure of the enzyme and were used in the search for intermediates and transition states. It was found that the substrate first binds at the active site as a monoanion. Next the dioxygen is bound, forming a hydroperoxo intermediate. The O-O bond, activated in this way undergoes homolytic cleavage leading to an oxyl and then to an extra epoxide radical with subsequent opening of the aromatic ring. The lactone ring is then hydrolyzed by the Mn-bound OH group, and the final product is obtained in the last reaction steps. Alternative reaction paths were considered, and their calculated barriers were found to be higher than for the suggested mechanism. The selectivity between the extra- and intra-cleavage pathways was found to be determined by the barriers for the decay of the radical state.

  • 32.
    Georgiev, Valentin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Noack, Holger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Blomberg, Margareta R.A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per E.M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    A DFT Study on the Catalytic Reactivity of a Functional Model Complex for  Intradiol-Cleaving Dioxygenases2010In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 114, no 17, 5878-5885 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The enzymatic ring cleavage of catechol derivatives is catalyzed by two groups of dioxygenases: extradiol- and intradiol-cleaving dioxygenases. Although having different oxidation state of their nonheme iron sites and different ligand coordinations, both groups of enzymes involve a common peroxy intermediate in their catalytic cycles. The factors that lead to either extradiol cleavage resulting in 2-hydroxymuconaldehyde or intradiol cleavage resulting in muconic acid are not fully understood. Well-characterized model compounds that mimic the functionality of these enzymes offer a basis for direct comparison to theoretical results. In this study the mechanism of a biomimetic iron complex is investigated with density functional theory (DFT). This complex catalyzes the ring opening of catecholate with exclusive formation of the intradiol cleaved product. Several spin states are possible for the transition metal system, with the quartet state found to be of main importance during the reaction course. The mechanism investigated provides an explanation for the observed selectivity of the complex. First, a bridging peroxide is formed, which decomposes to an alkoxy radical by O−O homolysis. In contrast to the subsequent barrier-free intradiol C−C bond cleavage, the extradiol pathway proceeds via the formation of an epoxide, which requires an additional activation barrier.

  • 33.
    Griese, Julia J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Roos, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Cox, Nicholas
    Shafaat, Hannah S.
    Branca, Rui M. M.
    Lehtio, Janne
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lubitz, Wolfgang
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Högbom, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Direct observation of structurally encoded metal discrimination and ether bond formation in a heterodinuclear metalloprotein2013In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 110, no 43, 17189-17194 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although metallocofactors are ubiquitous in enzyme catalysis, how metal binding specificity arises remains poorly understood, especially in the case of metals with similar primary ligand preferences such as manganese and iron. The biochemical selection of manganese over iron presents a particularly intricate problem because manganese is generally present in cells at a lower concentration than iron, while also having a lower predicted complex stability according to the Irving-Williams series (Mn-II < Fe-II < Ni-II < Co-II < Cu-II > Zn-II). Here we show that a heterodinuclear Mn/Fe cofactor with the same primary protein ligands in both metal sites self-assembles from MnII and FeII in vitro, thus diverging from the Irving-Williams series without requiring auxiliary factors such as metallochaperones. Crystallographic, spectroscopic, and computational data demonstrate that one of the two metal sites preferentially binds FeII over MnII as expected, whereas the other site is nonspecific, binding equal amounts of both metals in the absence of oxygen. Oxygen exposure results in further accumulation of the Mn/Fe cofactor, indicating that cofactor assembly is at least a two-step process governed by both the intrinsic metal specificity of the protein scaffold and additional effects exerted during oxygen binding or activation. We further show that the mixed-metal cofactor catalyzes a two-electron oxidation of the protein scaffold, yielding a tyrosine-valine ether cross-link. Theoretical modeling of the reaction by density functional theory suggests a multistep mechanism including a valyl radical intermediate.

  • 34.
    Guell, Mireia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Luis, Josep M.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sola, Miquel
    Theoretical study of the hydroxylation of phenols mediated by an end-on bound superoxo-copper(II) complex2009In: Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0949-8257, E-ISSN 1432-1327, Vol. 14, no 2, 273-285 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase and dopamine beta-monooxygenase are copper-containing proteins which catalyze essential hydroxylation reactions in biological systems. There are several possible mechanisms for the reductive O-2-activation at their mononuclear copper active site. Recently, Karlin and coworkers reported on the reactivity of a copper(II)-superoxo complex which is capable of inducing the hydroxylation of phenols with incorporated oxygen atoms derived from the Cu(II)-O-2(-) moiety. In the present work the reaction mechanism for the abovementioned superoxo complex with phenols is studied. The pathways found are analyzed with the aim of providing some insight into the nature of the chemical and biological copper-promoted oxidative processes with 1:1 Cu(I)/O-2-derived species.

  • 35.
    Guell, Mireia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Luis, Josep M.
    Sola, Miquel
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Theoretical study of the hydroxylation of phenolates by the Cu2O2(N,N '-dimethylethylenediamine)(2)(2+) complex2009In: Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0949-8257, E-ISSN 1432-1327, Vol. 14, no 2, 229-242 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tyrosinase catalyzes the ortho hydroxylation of monophenols and the subsequent oxidation of the diphenolic products to the resulting quinones. In efforts to create biomimetic copper complexes that can oxidize C-H bonds, Stack and coworkers recently reported a synthetic mu-eta(2):eta(2)-peroxodicopper(II)(DBED)(2) complex ( DBED is N,N'-di-tert-butylethylenediamine), which rapidly hydroxylates phenolates. A reactive intermediate consistent with a bis-mu-oxo-dicopper(III)-phenolate complex, with the O-O bond fully cleaved, is observed experimentally. Overall, the evidence for sequential O-O bond cleavage and C-O bond formation in this synthetic complex suggests an alternative mechanism to the concerted or late-stage O-O bond scission generally accepted for the phenol hydroxylation reaction performed by tyrosinase. In this work, the reaction mechanism of this peroxodicopper(II) complex was studied with hybrid density functional methods by replacing DBED in the mu-eta(2):eta(2)-peroxodicopper(II)(DBED)(2) complex by N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine ligands to reduce the computational costs. The reaction mechanism obtained is compared with the existing proposals for the catalytic ortho hydroxylation of monophenol and the subsequent oxidation of the diphenolic product to the resulting quinone with the aim of gaining some understanding about the copper-promoted oxidation processes mediated by 2: 1 Cu(I)O-2-derived species.

  • 36. Guell, Mireia
    et al.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Theoretical study of the catalytic mechanism of catechol oxidase2007In: Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0949-8257, E-ISSN 1432-1327, Vol. 12, no 8, 1251-1264 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanism for the oxidation of catechol by catechol oxidase has been studied using B3LYP hybrid density functional theory. On the basis of the X-ray structure of the enzyme, the molecular system investigated includes the first-shell protein ligands of the two metal centers as well as the second-shell ligand Cys92. The cycle starts out with the oxidized, open-shell singlet complex with oxidation states Cu-2(II,II) with a mu-eta(2) :eta(2) bridging peroxide, as suggested experimentally, which is obtained from the oxidation of Cu-2(I,I) by dioxygen. The substrate of each half-reaction is a catechol molecule approaching the dicopper complex: the first half-reaction involves Cu(I) oxidation by peroxide and the second one Cu(II) reduction. The quantitative potential energy profile of the reaction is discussed in connection with experimental data. Since no protons leave or enter the active site during the catalytic cycle, no external base is required. Unlike the previous density functional theory study, the dicopper complex has a charge of +2.

  • 37.
    Johansson, Adam Johannes
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Blomberg, Margareta R. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Siegbahn, Per. E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Quantifying the Effects of the Self-interaction Error in Density Functional Theory: When do the Delocalized States Appear? II. Iron-oxo Complexes and Closed-shell Substrate Molecules2008In: Journal of Chemical Physics, ISSN 0021-9606, E-ISSN 1089-7690, Vol. 129, 154301- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effects of the self-interaction error (SIE) in approximate density functional theory have several times been reported and quantified for the dissociation of charged radicals, charge transfer complexes, polarizabilities, and for transition states of reactions involving main-group molecules. In the present contribution, effects of the SIE in systems composed of a catalytic transition metal complex and a closed-shell substrate molecule are investigated. For this type of system, effects of the SIE have not been reported earlier. It is found that although the best density functionals (e.g., B3LYP) are capable of accurate predictions of structure, thermodynamics, and reactivity of such systems, there are situations and systems for which the magnitude of the SIE can be large, and for which the effects can be severe for the modeling of chemical reactivity. The largest energetic effect reported here is the artificial stabilization of a catalyst-substrate complex by as much as 18 kcal/mol. Also, the disappearance of significant energy barriers for hydrogen atom transfer in certain systems are reported. In line with earlier work, it is found that the magnitude of the SIE is related to the energetics of electron transfer between the metal catalyst and the substrate molecule. It is suggested that these problems might be circumvented by the inclusion of counterions or point charges that would alter the energetics of electron transfer. It is also pointed out that the effects of SIE in the modeling of transition metal reactivity need to be investigated further.

  • 38. Karlsson, Erik A.
    et al.
    Lee, Bao-Lin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Becerril, Valeria Saavedra
    Abrahamsson, Maria
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis and electron transfer processes in a new family of coupled Mn2–Ru complexesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Karlsson, Erik A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lee, Bao-Lin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Becerril, Valeria Saavedra
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Abrahamsson, Maria
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis and Electron-Transfer Processes in a New Family of Ligands for Coupled Ru-Mn2 Complexes2014In: ChemPlusChem, ISSN 2192-6506, Vol. 79, no 7, 936-950 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of [Ru(bpy)(3)](2+)-type (bpy= 2,2'-bipyridine) photosensitisers have been coupled to a ligand for Mn, which is expected to give a dinuclear complex that is active as a water oxidation catalyst. Unexpectedly, photophysical studies showed that the assemblies had very short lived excited states and that the decay patterns were complex and strongly dependent on pH. One dyad was prepared that was capable of catalysing chemical water oxidation by using [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+) as an oxidant. However, photochemical water oxidation in the presence of an external electron acceptor failed, presumably because the short excited-state lifetime precluded initial electron transfer to the added acceptor. The photophysical behaviour could be explained by the presence of an intricate excited-state manifold, as also suggested by time-dependent DFT calculations.

  • 40.
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Laine, Tanja M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ghanem, Shams
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Molecular ruthenium water oxidation catalysts carrying non-innocent ligands: mechanistic insight through structure-activity relationships and quantum chemical calculations2016In: Catalysis Science & Technology, ISSN 2044-4753, E-ISSN 2044-4761, Vol. 6, no 5, 1306-1319 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robust catalysts that mediate H2O oxidation are of fundamental importance for the development of novel carbon-neutral energy technologies. Herein we report the synthesis of a group of single-site Ru complexes. Structure-activity studies revealed that the individual steps in the oxidation of H2O depended differently on the electronic properties of the introduced ligand substituents. The mechanistic details associated with these complexes were investigated experimentally along with quantum chemical calculations. It was found that O-O bond formation for the developed Ru complexes proceeds via high-valent Ru-VI species, where the capability of accessing this species is derived from the non-innocent ligand architecture. This cooperative catalytic involvement and the ability of accessing Ru-VI are intriguing and distinguish these Ru catalysts from a majority of previously reported complexes, and might generate unexplored reaction pathways for activation of small molecules such as H2O.

  • 41.
    Laine, Tanja M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Huazhong University of Science & Technology, People's Republic of China.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    A Dinuclear Ruthenium-Based Water Oxidation Catalyst: Use of Non-Innocent Ligand Frameworks for Promoting Multi-Electron Reactions2015In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 21, no 28, 10039-10048 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insight into how H2O is oxidized to O-2 is envisioned to facilitate the rational design of artificial water oxidation catalysts, which is a vital component in solar-to-fuel conversion schemes. Herein, we report on the mechanistic features associated with a dinuclear Ru-based water oxidation catalyst. The catalytic action of the designed Ru complex was studied by the combined use of high-resolution mass spectrometry, electrochemistry, and quantum chemical calculations. Based on the obtained results, it is suggested that the designed ligand scaffold in Ru complex 1 has a non-innocent behavior, in which metal-ligand cooperation is an important part during the four-electron oxidation of H2O. This feature is vital for the observed catalytic efficiency and highlights that the preparation of catalysts housing non-innocent molecular frameworks could be a general strategy for accessing efficient catalysts for activation of H2O.

  • 42.
    Laine, Tanja M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kärkäs, Markus D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Huazhong University of Science & Technology, People's Republic of China.
    Åkermark, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lee, Bao-Lin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Karlsson, Erik A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Efficient photochemical water oxidation by a dinuclear molecular ruthenium complex2015In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 51, no 10, 1862-1865 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Herein is described the preparation of a dinuclear molecular Ru catalyst for H2O oxidation. The prepared catalyst mediates the photochemical oxidation of H2O with an efficiency comparable to state-of-the-art catalysts.

  • 43.
    Li, Xichen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Chen, Guangju
    Schinzel, Sandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    A comparison between artificial and natural water oxidation2011In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 40, no 42, 11296-11307 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two artificial water oxidation catalysts, the blue dimer and the Llobet catalyst, have been studied using hybrid DFT methods. The results are compared to those for water oxidation in the natural photosystem II enzyme. Studies on the latter system have now reached a high level of understanding, at present much higher than the one for the artificial systems. A recent high resolution X-ray structural investigation of PSII has confirmed the main features of the structure of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) suggested by previous DFT cluster studies. The O-O bond formation mechanism suggested is of direct coupling (DC) type between an oxygen radical and a bridging oxo ligand. A similar DC mechanism is found for the Llobet catalyst, while an acid-base (AB) mechanism is preferred for the blue dimer. All of them require at least one oxygen radical. Full energy diagrams, including both redox and chemical steps, have been constructed illustrating similarities and differences to the natural system. Unlike previous DFT studies, the results of the present study suggest that the blue dimer is rate-limited by the initial redox steps, and the Llobet catalyst by O(2) release. The results could be useful for further improvement of the artificial systems.

  • 44.
    Li, Xichen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Beijing Normal University, People's Republic of China.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Alternative mechanisms for O-2 release and O-O bond formation in the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II2015In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 17, no 18, 12168-12174 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a previous detailed study of all the steps of water oxidation in photosystem II, it was surprisingly found that O-2 release is as critical for the rate as O-O bond formation. A new mechanism for O-2 release has now been found, which can be described as an opening followed by a closing of the interior of the oxygen evolving complex. A transition state for peroxide rotation forming a superoxide radical, missed in the previous study, and a structural change around the outside manganese are two key steps in the new mechanism. However, O-2 release may still remain rate-limiting. Additionally, for the step forming the O-O bond, an alternative, experimentally suggested, mechanism was investigated. The new model calculations can rule out the precise use of that mechanism. However, a variant with a rotation of the ligands around the outer manganese by about 301 will give a low barrier, competitive with the old DFT mechanism. Both these mechanisms use an oxyl-oxo mechanism for O-O bond formation involving the same two manganese atoms and the central oxo group (O5).

  • 45. Li, Xichen
    et al.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Water Oxidation for Simplified Models of the Oxygen-Evolving Complex in Photosystem II2015In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 21, no 51, 18821-18827 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the main parts of the mechanism for water oxidation in photosystem II there has recently been very strong experimental support for the mechanism suggested by theoretical model studies. The question addressed in the present study is to what extent this knowledge can be used for the design of artificial catalysts. A major requirement for a useful artificial catalyst is that it is small enough to be synthesized. Small catalysts also have the big advantage that they could improve the catalysis per surface area. To make the mechanism found for PSII useful in this context, it needs to be analyzed in detail. A small model system was therefore used and the ligands were replaced one by one by water-derived ligands. Only the main chemical step of O-O bond formation was investigated in this initial study. The energetics for this small model and the larger one previously used for PSII are remarkably similar, which is the most important result of the present study. This shows that small model complexes have a potential for being very good water oxidation catalysts. It was furthermore found that there is a clear correlation between the barrier height for O-O bond formation and the type of optimal structure for the S-3 state. The analysis shows that a flexible central part of the complex is the key for efficient water oxidation.

  • 46.
    Li, Xichen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Water Oxidation Mechanism for Synthetic Co-Oxides with Small Nuclearity2013In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 135, no 37, 13804-13813 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hybrid DFT model calculations have been performed for some cobalt complexes capable of oxidizing water. Since a very plausible mechanism for the oxygen-evolving complex involving the cuboidal Mn4Ca structure in photosystem II (PSII) has recently been established, the most important part of the present study concerns a detailed comparison between cobalt and manganese as water oxidation catalysts. One similarity found is that a M(IV)-O-center dot state is the key precursor for O-O bond formation in both cases. This means that simply getting a M(IV) state is not enough; a formal M(V)=O state is required, with two oxidations on one center from M(III). For cobalt, not even that is enough. A singlet coupled state is required at this oxidation level, which is not the ground state. It is shown that there are also more fundamental differences between catalysts based on these metals. The favorable low-barrier direct coupling mechanism found for PSII is not possible for the corresponding cobalt complexes. The origin of this difference is explained. For the only oxygen-evolving cubic Co4O4 complex with a defined structure, described by Dismukes et al., the calculated results are in good agreement with experiments. For the Co-4 models of the amorphous cobalt-oxo catalyst found by Nocera et al., higher barriers are found than the one obtained experimentally. The reasons for this are discussed.

  • 47. Li, Xichen
    et al.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ryde, Ulf
    Simulation of the isotropic EXAFS spectra for the S-2 and S-3 structures of the oxygen evolving complex in photosystem II2015In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 13, 3979-3984 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the main features of water oxidation in photosystem II are now well understood, including the mechanism for O-O bond formation. For the intermediate S-2 and S-3 structures there is also nearly complete agreement between quantum chemical modeling and experiments. Given the present high degree of consensus for these structures, it is of high interest to go back to previous suggestions concerning what happens in the S-2-S-3 transition. Analyses of extended X-ray adsorption fine structure (EXAFS) experiments have indicated relatively large structural changes in this transition, with changes of distances sometimes larger than 0.3 angstrom and a change of topology. In contrast, our previous density functional theory (DFT)(B3LYP) calculations on a cluster model showed very small changes, less than 0.1 angstrom. It is here found that the DFT structures are also consistent with the EXAFS spectra for the S2 and S3 states within normal errors of DFT. The analysis suggests that there are severe problems in interpreting EXAFS spectra for these complicated systems.

  • 48. Li, Ying-Ying
    et al.
    Ye, Ke
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Mechanism of Water Oxidation Catalyzed by a Mononuclear Manganese Complex2017In: ChemSusChem, ISSN 1864-5631, E-ISSN 1864-564X, Vol. 10, no 5, 903-911 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The design and synthesis of biomimetic Mn complexes to catalyze oxygen evolution is a very appealing goal because water oxidation in nature employs a Mn complex. Recently, the mononuclear Mn complex [LMnII(H2O)(2)](2+) [1, L=Py2N(tBu)(2), Py= pyridyl] was reported to catalyze water oxidation electro-chemically at an applied potential of 1.23 V at pH 12.2 in aqueous solution. Density functional calculations were performed to elucidate the mechanism of water oxidation promoted by this catalyst. The calculations showed that 1 can lose two protons and one electron readily to produce [LMnIII(OH)(2)](+) (2), which then undergoes two sequential proton-coupled electron-transfer processes to afford [(LMnOO)-O-V](+) (4). The O-O bond formation can occur through direct coupling of the two oxido ligands or through nucleophilic attack of water. These two mechanisms have similar barriers of approximately 17 kcal mol(-1). The further oxidation of 4 to generate [(LMnO)-O-VI-O](2+) (5), which enables O-O bond formation, has a much higher barrier. In addition, ligand degradation by C-H activation has a similar barrier to that for the O-O bond formation, and this explains the relatively low turnover number of this catalyst.

  • 49. Liao, Rong-Zhen
    et al.
    Chen, Shi-Lu
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Unraveling the Mechanism and Regioselectivity of the B12-Dependent Reductive Dehalogenase PceA2016In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 22, no 35, 12391-12399 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PceA is a cobalamin-dependent reductive dehalogenase that catalyzes the dechlorination of perchloroethylene to trichloroethylene and then to cis-dichloroethylene as the sole final product. The reaction mechanism and the regioselectivity of this enzyme are investigated by using density functional calculations. Four different substrates, namely, perchloroethylene, trichloroethylene, cis-dichloroethylene, and chlorotheylene, have been considered and were found to follow the same reaction mechanism pattern. The reaction starts with the reduction of Co-II to Co-I through a proton-coupled electron transfer process, with the proton delivered to a Tyr246 anion. This is followed by concerted C-Cl bond heterolytic cleavage and proton transfer from Tyr246 to the substrate carbon atom, generating a Co-III-Cl intermediate. Subsequently, a one-electron transfer leads to the formation of the Co-II-Cl product, from which the chloride and the dehalogenated product can be released from the active site. The substrate reactivity follows the trend perchloroethylene>trichloroethylene >> cis-dichloroethylene >> chlorotheylene. The barriers for the latter two substrates are significantly higher compared with those for perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene, implying that PceA does not catalyze their degradation. In addition, the formation of cis-dichloroethylene has a lower barrier by 3.8kcalmol(-1) than the formation of trans-dichloroethylene and 1,1-dichloroethylene, reproducing the regioselectivity. These results agree quite well with the experimental findings, which show cis-dichloroethylene as the sole product in the PceA-catalyzed dechlorination of perchloethylene and trichloroethylene.

  • 50. Liao, Rong-Zhen
    et al.
    Chen, Shi-Lu
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Which Oxidation State Initiates Dehalogenation in the B12-Dependent Enzyme NpRdhA: Co-II, COI or Co-0?2015In: ACS Catalysis, ISSN 2155-5435, E-ISSN 2155-5435, Vol. 5, no 12, 7350-7358 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The quantum chemical cluster approach was used to elucidate the reaction mechanism of debromination catalyzed by the B12-dependent reductive dehalogenase NpRdliA. Various pathways, involving different oxidation states of the cobalt ion and different protonation states of the model, have been analyzed in order to find the most favorable one. We find that the reductive C Br cleavage takes place exclusively at the Co' state via a heterolytic pathway in the singlet state. Importantly, the C-H bond formation and the C Br bond cleavage proceeds via a concerted transition state, as opposed to the stepwise pathway suggested before. C Br cleavage at the Coll state has a very high barrier, and the reduction of Co' to Co is associated with a very negative potential; thus, reductive dehalogenation at Coll and Co can be safely ruled out. Examination of substrate with different halogen substitutions (F, Cl, Br, I) shows that the dehalogenation reactivity follows the order C I > C Br > C-C1 > C-F, and the barrier for defluorination is so high that NpRdhA cannot catalyze that reaction.

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