Change search
Refine search result
1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Britt Wadner2018In: Svenskt kvinnobiografiskt lexikon, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Från lagringskultur till streamingkultur: Om att skriva samtidens näthistoria2014In: Återkopplingar / [ed] Marie Cronqvist, Patrik Lundell, Pelle Snickars, Lund: Mediehistoria, Lunds Universitet , 2014, p. 219-234Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    If the Song has No Price, is it Still a Commodity?: Rethinking the Commodification of Digital Music2017In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 146-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In music streaming services like Spotify, discrete pieces of music no longer has a price, as has traditionally been the case in music retailing, both analog and digital. This article discusses the theoretical and practical implications of this shift towards subscriptions, starting from a critical review of recent literature dealing with the commodification of music. The findings have a relevance that is not limited to music or digital media, but also apply more broadly on the study of commodification. At the theoretical level, the article compares two ways of defining the commodity, one structural (Marx), one situational (Appadurai, Kopytoff), arguing for the necessity of a theory that can distinguish commodities from all that which is not (yet) commodified. This is demonstrated by taking Spotify as a case, arguing that it does not sell millions of different commodities to its users, but only one: the subscription itself. This has broad economic and cultural implications, of which four are highlighted:(1) The user of Spotify has no economic incentive to limit music listening, because the price of a subscription is the same regardless of the quantity of music consumed.(2) For the same reason, Spotify as a company cannot raise its revenues by making existing customers consume more of the product, but only by raising the number of subscribers, or by raising the price of a subscription.(3) Within platforms like Spotify, it is not possible to use differential pricing of musical recordings, as has traditionally been the case in music retail. Accordingly, record companies or independent artists hence can no longer compete for listeners by offering their music at a discount.(4) Within the circuit of capital. Spotify may actually be better understood as a commodity producer than as a distributor, implying a less symbiotic relationship to the recorded music industry.

  • 4.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Kan pengar fördelas?2015In: Glänta, ISSN 1104-5205, no 3-4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Kreditkonsumtion i Sverige, 1945–1985: Avbetalningshandel, kreditkort och dess politiska reglering2016In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 136, no 4, p. 626-657Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna artikel ges en deskriptiv översikt över hur möjligheten att köpa på kredit – på avbetalning eller på kort – bidrog till att forma efterkrigstidens konsumtionssamhälle i Sverige. Bland annat riktas ljuset på de olika motiven för att begränsa kreditgivningen genom särskild lagstiftning och på framväxten av kreditupplysningsregister. Redogörelsen visar bland annat att kreditkonsumtion inte blev en partipolitisk fråga förrän på 1970-talet, efter att Kooperativa förbundet hade övergivit sin restriktiva linje.

  • 6.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Musik, politik och svenskhet2014In: Det långa 1990-talet: när Sverige förändrades / [ed] Kristina Abiala, Umeå: Boréa Bokförlag, 2014, p. 405-421Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Nätutopier och nätdystopier: Om 2000-talets sökande efter internets väsen2017In: Samtider: Perspektiv på 2000-talets idéhistoria / [ed] Anders Burman, Lena Lennerhed, Göteborg: Daidalos, 2017, p. 261-303Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Per Lundin, Computers in Swedish Society2014In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 134, no 3, p. 551-553Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Protecting the musicians and/or the record industry? On the history of ‘neighbouring rights’ and the role of Fascist Italy2015In: Queen Mary Journal of Intellectual Property, ISSN 2045-9807, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 327-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The early history of the so-called ‘neighbouring rights’, as part of the history of copyright, has so far been given very little attention by scholars. This article sheds light on a European contest over the rights in sound recordings during the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. This forms an important part of the background to the Rome Convention of 1961. The article first looks separately at how musicians’ unions and the record industry were raising different demands for protective legislation, motivated by the use of new electronic media. At the beginning, no one imagined that these protections would be bundled together as ‘neighbouring rights’. While the International Labour Organization (ILO) put great efforts into creating a convention protecting only the performers, another actor turned out to be more influential in the long run, proposing a hierarchical bundling of rights in which only record companies were entitled to compensation for the use of recordings. This actor was the Fascist government of Italy. The article argues that there are some continuities from the legal philosophy of Italian Fascism to the system of ‘neighbouring rights’ established in the Rome Convention.

  • 10.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Robotarnas kapprustning: Om spam i en nät- och bokhistorisk kontext2014In: Information som problem: Medieanalytiska texter från medeltid till framtid / [ed] Otfried Czaika, Jonas Nordin & Pelle Snickars, Stockholm: Kungliga biblioteket , 2014, p. 242-257Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Swedish Music Export: The Making of a Miracle2017In: Made in Sweden: Studies in Popular Music / [ed] Alf Björnberg, Thomas Bossius, New York: Routledge, 2017Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The Pirate Bay och den nya nätpolitiken2013In: Sveriges historia. 1965-2012: [rekordåren, ett socialdemokratiskt århundrade, vänstervind och högervåg, miljö och kärnkraft, kriserna, det mångkulturella Sverige, världens mest jämställda land, den nya individualismen, neutralitetspolitikens fall, maktskifte och systemskifte, från kanal 1 till Internet] / [ed] Kjell Östberg, Jenny Andersson, Stockholm: Norstedts Förlag, 2013, p. 471-474Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Towards a Postdigital Sensibility: How to get Moved by too Much Music2015In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 7, p. 255-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores the affective consequences of the new mode of instant access to enormous levels of musical recordings in digital format. It is suggested that this "musical superabundance" might weaken the individuals ability to be affected by music in everyday life, while at the same time leading to a renewed interest in collective experience, in ways which are not limited to established notions of musical "liveness". According to a theory of affect influenced by Spinoza, what is at stake is the capacity of the body to be affected by music. The article proposes that a renegotiated relationship between collective and individual modes of experiencing music can be conceptualized with help of Spinozas distinction between two kinds of affections: actions and passions. After scrutinizing the interface of hardware like Apples Ipod and online services like Spotify, the article proceeds by discussing three musical practices which can all be understood as responses to the superabundance of musical recordings: (1) the ascetic practice of "No Music Day"; (2) the revival of cassette culture; (3) the "bass materialism" associated with the music known as dubstep. While none of these approaches provide any solution to the problem of abundance, they can still be understood as attempts to cultivate a "postdigital sensibility". The article tries to conceptualize the postdigital in a way that transcends the narrower notion of "post-digital aesthetics" that has recently been gaining popularity. Finally, it is argued that such a sensibility has a political significance in its potential to subvert the contemporary processes of commodification.

  • 14.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Two fascisms in contemporary Europe? Understanding the contemporary split of the Radical Right2014In: In the tracks of Breivik: far right networks in Northern and Eastern Europe / [ed] Mats Deland, Michael Minkenberg, Christin Mays, Berlin: LIT Verlag, 2014, p. 53-70Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fleischer suggests that the divergences between the far right in Eastern and Northwestern Europe in the late 2000s could be understood as a difference between multi-fascism, concentrated on the preservation and re-birth of ethnic identities, and mono-fascism, pre-occupied with the defense of "Western" values against perceived threats, foremost from Muslim populations. Although, as Fleischer emphasizes in his afterword, these forms now appear to have been transient, his chapter emphasizes the need for a synthesized and theoretically refined perspective on the contemporary far right.

  • 15.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Vad betyder det att musik är ”live”?2018In: Musikens makt / [ed] Jenny Björkman, Arne Jarrick, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2018, p. 217-232Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Värdekritisk kristeori: att tänka kapitalets sammanbrott2014In: Fronesis, ISSN 1404-2614, no 46-47Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Kullenberg, Christopher
    The Political Significance of Spotify in Sweden – Analysing the #backaspotify Campaign using Twitter Data2018In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the political significance of the streaming music company Spotify in Sweden, taking as a case a coordinated campaign in late spring 2016, known by the hashtag #backaspotify (translated as “support Spotify!”), which was mainly played out on the social media platform Twitter. The campaign is analysed using a set of data retrieved from Twitter, examining both the content and the interactions in 1,791 messages. Results show that the main political issue concerned the lack of access to rented apartments in central Stockholm, and that the main actors in the campaign were predominantly associated with public affairs consultants and the youth wings of political parties belonging to the centre-right. The campaign, however, was very short-lived and had diminished significantly already after two days. We conclude that Spotify transcends its role as a streaming music company, and additionally can be used as a point of reference in political campaigns to promote issues that are of wider scope than the music industry alone.

  • 18.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Snickars, Pelle
    Discovering Spotify – A Thematic Introduction2017In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 130-145Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Vonderau, Patrick
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, Cinema Studies.
    Jeremy W. Morris (2015) Selling Digital Music, Formatting Culture2017In: Culture Machine, ISSN 1465-4121, E-ISSN 1465-4121Article, book review (Other academic)
1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf