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  • 1.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Retsö, DagStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Långa linjer och många fält: Festskrift till Johan Söderberg2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Leijonhufvud, Lotta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Wilson, Rob
    Moberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Retsö, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Söderlind, Ulrica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Five centuries of Stockholm winter/spring temperatures reconstructed from documentary evidenceand instrumental observations2010In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 101, no 1-2, p. 109-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Historical documentary sources, reflecting different port activities in Stockholm, are utilised to derive a 500-year winter/spring temperature reconstruction for the region. These documentary sources reflect sea ice conditions in the harbour inlet and those series that overlap with the instrumental data correlate well with winter/spring temperatures. By refining dendroclimatological methods,the time-series were composited to a mean series and calibrated (1756–1841;r2 = 66%) against Stockholm January–April temperatures. Strong verification was confirmed (1842–1892; r2 = 60%; RE/CE = 0.55). By including the instrumental data, the quantified (QUAN) reconstruction indicates that recent two decades have been the warmest period for the last 500 years. Coldest conditions occurred during the 16th/17th and early 19th centuries. An independent qualitative (QUAL)historical index was also derived for the Stockholm region. Comparison between QUAN and QUAL shows good coherence at inter-annual time-scales, but QUAL distinctly appears to lack low frequency information. Comparison is also made to other winter temperature based annually resolved records for the Baltic region.Between proxy coherence is generally good although it decreases going back in time with the 1500–1550 period being the weakest period—possibly reflecting data quality issues in the different reconstructions.

  • 3.
    Moberg, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Leijonhufvud, Lotta
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Retsö, Dag
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Söderlind, Ulrica
    Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    500 års väder i Stockholm2008In: Forskning och framsteg, ISSN ISSN 0015-7937, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 12-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    En helt ny klimatkurva har forskare tagit fram ur gamla sjöfartsdokument. Kurvan sträcker sig flera hundra år längre tillbaka än temperaturmätningarna från och med mitten av 1700-talet. Den visar att de senaste två årtiondenas varmare klimat avviker från de senaste fwem seklernas.

  • 4.
    Retsö, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    A contribution to the history of European winters: some climatological proxy data from early 16th century Swedish documentary sources2002In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 52, no 1-2, p. 137-173Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Retsö, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Brasiliens historia2011Book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Retsö, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Documentary Evidence of Historical Floods and Extreme Rainfall Events in Sweden 1400-18002014In: Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, ISSN 1027-5606, E-ISSN 1607-7938, Vol. 11, p. 10085-10116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores documentary evidence of floods and extreme rainfall events in Sweden in the pre-instrumental period (1400–1800). The survey shows that two subperiods can be considered as flood-rich, 1590–1670 and the early 18th century. The result is related 5 to a low degree of human impact on hydrology during the period, and suggest that climatic factors, such as lower temperatures and increased precipitation connected to the so called Little Ice Age, should be considered as the main driver behind flood frequency and magnitude.

  • 7.
    Retsö, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies, Institute of Latin American Studies.
    Estância Demétria 1974-2004: Trettio år av biodynamiskt jordbruk i Brasilien2004In: Forum för antroposofiArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Retsö, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Femhundra år av latinamerikansk historia: inget sammanbrott, inget genombrott2010 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Retsö, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Hur mäta en dagled?: senmedeltida brev som källa för beräkning av restider och rekonstruktion av itinerarier2002In: Ny väg till medeltidsbreven: från ett medeltidssymposium i Svenska Riksarkivet 26-28 november 1999 / [ed] Claes Gejrot, Roger Andersson och Kerstin Abukhanfusa, Stockholm: Riksarkivet, 2002, p. 313-336Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Retsö, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Latin-Amerikas historie2015Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11.
    Retsö, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Med hand och mun, med bud och brev: närvaro och auktoritet i Sverige 1300-15602014In: Politiska rum: kontroll, konflikt och rörelse i det förmoderna Sverige 1300-1850 / [ed] Mats Hallenberg & Magnus Linnarsson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2014, p. 101-117Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Retsö, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Människans mobilitet och naturens motsträvighet: studier kring frågan om reshastighet under medeltiden2007Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Undersökningen syftar till att dels etablera ett kvantitivt mått på en aspekt av rumslig mobilitet i det medeltida Sverige, reshastigheten, dels hur man skall gå tillväga för att etablera ett sådant mått.

  • 13.
    Retsö, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies, Institute of Latin American Studies.
    Norske innvandrere i Brasil 1885-19311999In: Genealogen, Vol. 13, no 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Retsö, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Sturearkivet: en senmedeltida brevsamling2004In: Arkiv, samhälle och forskning, ISSN 0349-0505, no 1/2, p. 53-76Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Retsö, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies, Institute of Latin American Studies.
    Svenskar i Brasilien 1808-1932: Upplysningar ur brasilianska arkiv1997In: Släkt och hävd, ISSN 0783-1803Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Retsö, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The benefit of confinement: Women's geographical mobility in the Middle Ages and the travels of Matta Ivarsdotter 1504-15112007In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 73, no 3, p. 39-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Female travel in medieval times, as opposed to other forms of geographical mobility such as migration, has been given relatively little attention by scholars. This article attempts to illuminate the issue, and the possibilities of its further exploration, through an analysis of the travels of Matta Ivarsdotter, the wife of Sweden's regent 1504-1511 Svante Nilsson. The pattern of her travels shows that the degree of geographical mobility for a woman of her social standing was rather high, probably even as high as that of her husband, and that although gendered division of,labour limited her to a domestic sphere, that did not constrain her in terms of spatial mobility and experience. On the contrary, the delegation of women to the domestic sphere meant for medieval women within the upper classes, where the domestic sphere consisted of a great number of spatially dispersed mansions and properties, often that such a responsability entailed precisely a wide geographical experience and horizon. The result enforces earlier scholarly criticism against the simplistic use of the 'domestic/public' dichotomy to explain women's situation in the Middle Ages. Furthermore, when Matta did transcend the domestic/public border by becoming, on at least three occasions, chief responsible for two of the realm's most important castles, her potentially powerful position as a geographically mobile regent's wife within the female/domestic sphere was substituted by a position of an immobile castle commander within the male/public sphere, which, paradoxically approached the immobility and thereby powerlessness proscribed by Medieval idealistic thought on gender.

  • 17.
    Retsö, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Tidender i orons tid: Informationsförmedling under senmedeltiden2016In: Kunskapens tider: Historiska perspektiv på kunskapssamhället / [ed] Annika Sandén och Elisabeth Elgán, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2016, 1, p. 6-18Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Retsö, Dag
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The late-medieval crisis quantified: real taxes in Sweden, 1320-15502015In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 1-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article aims to assess the size of secular taxes in medieval Sweden in real terms. The size oftaxes is calculated as the quantity of butter and the number of oxen that could be bought for agiven tax sum. In addition, nominal taxes are converted into grams of silver. Three distinctiveperiods are discerned: (1) a phase of low taxes 1320–1363; (2) a period of very high taxes from1363 up to the Engelbrekt uprising in 1434; and (3) a new phase of low taxes up to the mid-16th century. A study of taxes at the regional and national levels makes it possible to evaluatethe weight of the main regions of the kingdom (including Finland) in the central fiscal system atthe end of the medieval era. A national overview of the situation around 1530 is put forward.During the period of high fiscal pressure in Sweden in the decades around 1400, taxes pertaxpayer were much higher than those of England. In the low-tax periods, on the other hand,taxes were insufficient to create a working monopoly of violence. The result was drawn-outconflict between warlords for a large part of the 15th century and well into the 16th century.

  • 19. Wetter, Oliver
    et al.
    Pfister, Christian
    Werner, Johannes P.
    Zorita, Eduardo
    Wagner, Sebastian
    Seneviratne, Sonia I.
    Herget, Juergen
    Gruenewald, Uwe
    Luterbacher, Juerg
    Alcoforado, Maria-Joao
    Barriendos, Mariano
    Bieber, Ursula
    Brazdil, Rudolf
    Burmeister, Karl H.
    Camenisch, Chantal
    Contino, Antonio
    Dobrovolny, Petr
    Glaser, Ruediger
    Himmelsbach, Iso
    Kiss, Andrea
    Kotyza, Oldrich
    Labbe, Thomas
    Limanowka, Danuta
    Litzenburger, Laurent
    Nordl, Oyvind
    Pribyl, Kathleen
    Retsö, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Riemann, Dirk
    Rohr, Christian
    Siegfried, Werner
    Söderberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Spring, Jean-Laurent
    The year-long unprecedented European heat and drought of 1540-a worst case2014In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 125, no 3-4, p. 349-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The heat waves of 2003 in Western Europe and 2010 in Russia, commonly labelled as rare climatic anomalies outside of previous experience, are often taken as harbingers of more frequent extremes in the global warming-influenced future. However, a recent reconstruction of spring-summer temperatures for WE resulted in the likelihood of significantly higher temperatures in 1540. In order to check the plausibility of this result we investigated the severity of the 1540 drought by putting forward the argument of the known soil desiccation-temperature feedback. Based on more than 300 first-hand documentary weather report sources originating from an area of 2 to 3 million km(2), we show that Europe was affected by an unprecedented 11-month-long Megadrought. The estimated number of precipitation days and precipitation amount for Central and Western Europe in 1540 is significantly lower than the 100-year minima of the instrumental measurement period for spring, summer and autumn. This result is supported by independent documentary evidence about extremely low river flows and Europe-wide wild-, forest- and settlement fires. We found that an event of this severity cannot be simulated by state-of-the-art climate models.

1 - 19 of 19
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