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  • 1.
    Högnäs, Robin S.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Grotta, Alessandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    The Intergenerational Transmission of Early Childbearing: Examining Direct and Indirect Associations in a Swedish Birth Cohort2019In: Behavioral Sciences, ISSN 2076-328X, Vol. 9, no 5, article id 54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Research shows that early childbearing is associated negatively with educational attainment and socioeconomic status (SES). Children born to young versus older mothers often do less well in school, and many have early first births. Some studies suggest that mothers' early childbearing operates through SES to influence the daughters' early childbearing, and some argue that the association is strong net of SES. The current study tests these direct and indirect associations. Methods. We estimate the pathways through which mothers' early childbearing influences daughters' early childbearing in several steps. First, we examine bivariate associations between mothers' early childbearing and SES, followed by bivariate associations between mothers' SES outcomes and their daughters' early childbearing. We then estimate the average marginal effects (AMEs) of mothers' early children on daughters', and a KHB decomposition to examine direct and indirect associations. Results. Findings suggest both direct and indirect associations. Nested models show that, net of a range of SES characteristics, mothers' early childbearing increases the probability of daughters' by approximately 8%; and KHB results suggest 37% mediation, with daughters' school performance (12%) and household educational attainment (10%) contributing the highest shares. Conclusion. Mothers' early childbearing and subsequent SES collectively influence the long-term wellbeing of children. Thus, early childbearing has consequences both within and across generations.

  • 2.
    Högnäs, Robin S.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    B. Almquist, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Adolescent social isolation and premature mortality in a Swedish birth cohort2020In: Journal of Population Research, ISSN 1443-2447, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research shows consistently that social ties are important for longevity, and they may be particularly important during adolescence. An absence of social ties, or social isolation, during adolescence may adversely affect long-term health and wellbeing. While prior research has examined associations between isolation from friends and long-term health, and having no siblings and mortality, no study (of which we are aware) considers jointly both the role of having no friends and no siblings, nor more generally with whom adolescents spend time, and the risk of premature mortality. This paper extends the literature by drawing on data from the Stockholm Birth Cohort Study to examine the association between different types of social isolation during adolescence (i.e., an absence of friends, siblings, and time with other adolescents) and the risk of premature mortality by midlife. Results suggest that having no siblings, being unliked at school, and spending (mostly) no time with other adolescents, increases the risk of premature mortality. The association between being unliked and premature mortality was attenuated by demographic and adolescent characteristics. Consistent with our expectations, net of a robust set of covariates, adolescents who had no siblings and mostly spent no time with other adolescents (i.e., isolates) were the group most vulnerable to premature mortality by midlife. However, this was only true for females.

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