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  • 1. Andringa, w
    et al.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Van Gerven, m
    Women’s working hours: the interplay between gender role attitudes, motherhood, and public childcare support in 23 European countries2015In: International journal of sociology and social policy, ISSN 0144-333X, E-ISSN 1758-6720, Vol. 35, no 9/10, p. 582-599Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Maldonado, Laurie C.
    et al.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Single-parent family poverty in 24 OECD countries: a focus on market and redistribution strategies2015Report (Other academic)
  • 3. Maldonado, L.C
    et al.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Family Policies and single Parent Poverty in 18 OECD Countries, 1978-20082014Report (Other academic)
  • 4. Maldonado, L.C.
    et al.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Family Policies and Single Parent Poverty in 18 OECD Countries, 1978-20082015In: Community, Work and Family, ISSN 1366-8803, E-ISSN 1469-3615, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 395-415Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Association, aggregation, and paradoxes: on the positive correlation between fertility and women’s employment2015In: Demographic Research, ISSN 1435-9871, Vol. 32, no 23, p. 1-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Book Review: Women and society : the road to change2013In: Sociological research online, ISSN 1360-7804, E-ISSN 1360-7804, Vol. 18, no 3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Gender equality and poverty are intrinsically linked2017Other (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Kinderbijslag houdt vrouwen van het werk2014In: Tijdschrift voor Sociale Vraagstukken, ISSN 2214-3963, no feb 13Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Measures of success Reply2016In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 352, no 6281, p. 30-30Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Social responsibility2018In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 360, no 6396, p. 1411-1411Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Kossek, Ellen Ernst
    Work-life balance in times of recession, austerity and beyond2018In: Community, Work and Family, ISSN 1366-8803, E-ISSN 1469-3615, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 106-109Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Maldonado, Laurie C.
    Prepare versus Repair? Combining Parental Leave and Family Allowances for Social Investment Against Single-Parent Poverty2015In: Belgisch tijdschrift voor Sociale Zekerheid, ISSN 0775-0234, no 1, p. 115-123Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Maldonado, Laurie C.
    Single-Parent Families and In-Work Poverty2018In: Handbook of Research on In-Work Poverty / [ed] Henning Lohmann, Ive Marx, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Maldonado, Laurie C.
    The triple bind of single-parent families: Resources, employment and policies2018In: The triple bind of single-parent families: Resources, employment and policies to improve wellbeing / [ed] Rense Nieuwenhuis, Laurie C. Maldonado, Bristol: Policy Press, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Maldonado, Laurie C.
    The triple bind of single-parent families: Resources, employment and policies to improve wellbeing2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Munzi, Teresa
    Gornick, Janet C.
    Comparative Research with Net and Gross Income Data: An Evaluation of Two Netting Down Procedures for the LIS Database2017In: The Review of Income and Wealth, ISSN 0034-6586, E-ISSN 1475-4991, Vol. 63, no 3, p. 564-573Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers seeking to perform country-comparative and trend analyses using income data have to account for the fact that income surveys differ in whether income is measured gross or net of taxes and contributions. We discuss, develop, and evaluate two ‘netting down procedures’ for data in the LIS Database. Evaluations of these netting down procedures indicate that comparisons across gross and net datasets can be greatly improved when netting down procedures are applied. In several cases, however, substantial amounts of bias remain.

  • 17.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    et al.
    Institute for Innovation and Governance Studies (IGS), University of Twente.
    Munzi, Teresa
    Gornick, Janet C.
    Netting down gross earnings data in the LIS database: an evaluation of two procedures2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    LIS researchers who seek to perform country-comparative and / or trend analyses have to account for the fact that in some LIS datasets income variables were reported net of taxes and social security contributions, while in other datasets income variables were reported gross of taxes and social security contributions. In this technical paper we discuss, develop, and evaluate two `netting down procedures' that help reduce bias that would be introduced by directly comparing net and gross datasets. Results of evaluating the performance of these netting down procedures indicate that the validity of the comparison of net and gross datasets can be greatly improved when netting down procedures are applied. In several cases, however, substantial amounts of bias remain.

  • 18.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Need, Ariana
    Van der Kolk, Henk
    Family policies, women’s earnings, and between-household inequality: trends in 18 OECD countries from 1981 to 20052013Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Need, Ariana
    Van der Kolk, Henk
    Is there such a thing as too long childcare leave?2017In: International journal of sociology and social policy, ISSN 0144-333X, E-ISSN 1758-6720, Vol. 37, no 1-2, p. 2-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The purpose of this paper is to revisit the question whether women’s employment is negatively affected in countries with very long periods of childcare leave.

    Design/methodology/approach

    The authors analyzed data on 192,484 individual women, 305 country-years, and 18-countries, combined with country-level data on childcare, unemployment and service sector size.

    Findings

    The authors found that in countries with short periods of childcare leave the motherhood-employment gap is smaller than in countries with no childcare leave, while in countries with long periods of childcare leave the motherhood-employment gap is bigger than with short periods of leave.

    Originality/value

    The authors argued that to correctly answer the long-leave question – the relationship between duration of leave and employment of women should be explicitly hypothesized as being curvilinear; and childcare leave should be expected to affect only mothers, not women without children; testing the long-leave hypothesis requires the use of country-comparative data in which countries are observed repeatedly over time; and is best tested against person-level data.

  • 20.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Need, Ariana
    Van der Kolk, Henk
    Women’s earnings: trends in earnings inequality within and between coupled households in 18 OECD countries, 1981-20052013Report (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    te Grotenhuis, Manfred
    Pelzer, Ben
    Weighted Effect Coding for Observational Data with wec2017In: The R Journal, ISSN 2073-4859, E-ISSN 2073-4859, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 477-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Weighted effect coding refers to a specific coding matrix to include factor variables in generalised linear regression models. With weighted effect coding, the effect for each category represents the deviation of that category from the weighted mean (which corresponds to the sample mean). This technique has particularly attractive properties when analysing observational data, that commonly are unbalanced. The wec package is introduced, that provides functions to apply weighted effect coding to factor variables, and to interactions between (a.) a factor variable and a continuous variable and between (b.) two factor variables.

  • 22.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Tøge, Anne Grete
    Palme, Joakim
    The health penalty of single parents in institutional context2018In: The triple bind of single-parent families: Resources, employment and policies to improve wellbeing / [ed] Rense Nieuwenhuis, Laurie C. Maldonado, Bristol: Policy Press, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    van der Kolk, Henk
    Need, Ariana
    Women's earnings and household inequality in OECD countries, 1973-20132017In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 3-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article shows that women's rising earnings contributed to reducing inequality in household earnings, with respect to couples. We use data from the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) on 1,148,762 coupled households, covering 18 OECD countries and the period from 1973 to 2013. In this period, women's share of household earnings grew, spouses' earnings became more strongly and positively correlated in various countries, and inequality in women's earnings was reduced. Inequality in household earnings increased due to the rising correlation between spouses' earnings, but was reduced more by the decline of inequality in women's earnings. Had women's earnings remained unchanged since the 1970s and 1980s, inequality in household earnings would have been higher around 2010 in all observed OECD countries. Household inequality was reduced least by trends in women's earnings in countries with a long history of high female labor-force participation, such as Finland (3% reduction) and Sweden (5%), and most in countries that observed a stronger increase in female labor-force participation in recent decades such as Spain (31%) and the Netherlands (41%). As more countries are reaching a plateau in the growth of women's employment and earnings, the potential for further stimulating women's employment and earnings to counter both women's and household inequality seems to be increasingly limited.

  • 24.
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Van Lancker, Wim
    Family Policies2017In: Oxford Bibliographies, Oxford University Press, 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 25. te Grotenhuis, Manfred
    et al.
    Pelzer, Ben
    Eisinga, Rob
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Schmidt-Catran, Alexander
    Konig, Ruben
    A novel method for modelling interaction between categorical variables2017In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 427-431Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26. te Grotenhuis, Manfred
    et al.
    Pelzer, Ben
    Eisinga, Rob
    Nieuwenhuis, Rense
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Schmidt-Catran, Alexander
    Konig, Ruben
    When size matters: advantages of weighted effect coding in observational studies2017In: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 163-167Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 26 of 26
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  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
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