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  • 1.
    Andersson, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Bunar, Nihad
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Böhlmark, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Edmark, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Institutet för näringslivsforskning (IFN), Sverige.
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Fredriksson, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Malmberg, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Vlachos, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Öckert, Björn
    "Lottning bättre än närhet och kötid för att bryta segregering"2017In: Dagens Nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 30 aprilArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Bihagen, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nermo, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Social Class and Employment Relations: Comparisons between the ESeC and EGP class schemas using European data2010In: Social Class in Europe: An introduction to the European Socio-economic Classification: Rose, D. and Harrison, E. (eds.), London and New York: Abingdon(Oxon): Routledge , 2010, p. 89-113Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3. Bukodi, Erzsebet
    et al.
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Goldthorpe, John H.
    The effects of social origins and cognitive ability on educational attainment: Evidence from Britain and Sweden2014In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 57, no 4, p. 293-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In previous work we have shown that in Britain and Sweden alike parental class, parental status and parental education have independent effects on individuals’ educational attainment. In this paper we extend our analyses, first by also including measures of individuals’ early-life cognitive ability, and second by bringing our results for Britain and Sweden into direct comparative form. On the basis of extensive birth-cohort data for both countries, we find that when cognitive ability is introduced into our analyses, parental class, status and education continue to have significant, and in fact only moderately reduced and largely persisting, effects on the educational attainment of members of successive cohorts. There is some limited evidence for Britain, but not for Sweden, that cognitive ability has a declining effect on educational attainment, and a further cross-national difference is that in Britain, but not in Sweden, some positive interaction effects occur between advantaged social origins and high cognitive ability in relation to educational success. Overall, though, cross-national similarities are most apparent, and especially in the extent to which parental class, status and education, when taken together, create wide disparities in the eventual educational attainment of individuals who in early life were placed at similar levels of cognitive ability. Some wider implications of these findings are considered.

  • 4. Bukodi, Erzsébet
    et al.
    Eibl, Ferdinand
    Buchholz, Sandra
    Marzadro, Sonia
    Minello, Alessandra
    Wahler, Susanne
    Blossfeld, Hans-Peter
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Schizzerotto, Antonio
    Linking the macro to the micro: a multidimensional approach to educational inequalities in four European countries2018In: European Societies: The Official Journal of the European Sociological Association, ISSN 1461-6696, E-ISSN 1469-8307, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 26-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent research into educational inequalities has shown the importance of decomposing social origins into parental class, status and education, representing economic, socio-cultural and educational family resources, respectively. But we know little about how inequalities in educational attainment at the micro-level map onto institutional characteristics of educational systems at the macro-level, if we treat social origins in a multidimensional way. Drawing on the rich over-time variation in educational systems in four European countries–Britain, Sweden, Germany and Italy–this paper develops and tests a number of hypotheses regarding the effects of various components of social origins on individuals’ educational attainment in different institutional contexts. It is evident from our results that a great deal of similarity exists across nations with different educational systems inthe persisting importance for individuals’ educational attainment of parental class, status and education. But our findings also indicate that changes in the institutional features of educational systems have, in some instances although not in others, served to reinforce or to offset the social processes generating educational inequalities at the micro level.

  • 5.
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Affluence, Happiness, Meaningfulness or Freedom of Action? On Measuring Quality of Life to Assess Societal Development2018In: Nova Acta Leopoldina, ISSN 0369-5034, Vol. 417, p. 127-142Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Den sociala selektionen till högre utbildning - restriktioner och val2010In: Lärande Skola Bildning / [ed] Ulf P. Lundgren, Roger Säljö, Caroline Liberg, Stockholm: Natur och Kultur , 2010, p. 365-394Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Educational institutions and social selection in education2013In: Chancen bilden: Wege zu einer gerechteren Bildung - ein internationaler Erfahrungsaustausch / [ed] David Deißner, Wiesbaden: Springer, 2013, p. 111-124Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Får vi det bättre? om mått på livskvalitet: betänkande av Utredningen om mått på livskvalitet2015Book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    How does education depend on the social origin?2019In: Research handbook on sociology of education / [ed] Rolf Becker, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019, p. 35-56Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Is it enough to be bright? Parental background, cognitive ability and educational attainment2016In: European Societies: The Official Journal of the European Sociological Association, ISSN 1461-6696, E-ISSN 1469-8307, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 117-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do separate factors of the social background – parental education, social class, social status and earnings – affect educational attainment independently of each other and to what extent is the association between these background factors and educational attainment transmitted via cognitive ability? Close to 28,000 randomly selected Swedish school children participated in a test of cognitive ability at age 13. Information on the four origin factors and on the children’s highest level of education was collected from Swedish registers with few missing data. The data were analysed by means of ordinary least squares regression. Parental education and social class are more highly associated with educational attainment than parental status and earnings, but all four factors have an effect on level of education independently of each other and of cognitive ability at age 13. Between 16 and 19 percent of the variance in education is accounted for by the social origin factors. Around one third of the effects of the origin factors is transmitted via cognitive ability. The paper ends with a short discussion of possible mechanisms, other than cognitive ability, that link social background with education.

  • 11.
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Kan den sociala rörligheten ökas genom politiska åtgärder?2018In: Kungliga Vitterhetsakademiens årsbok 2018, Kungliga Vitterhetsakademien , 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    LNU från utredning till forskning. Ett historiskt perspektiv2014In: Ojämlikhetens dimensioner: uppväxtvillkor, arbete och hälsa i Sverige / [ed] Evertsson M. och C. Magnusson, Stockholm: Liber, 2014, p. 30-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Soaring in the best of times2007In: Best of Times? The Social Impact of the Celtic Tiger, IPA, Dublin , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Social selection in Stockholm schools: primary and secondary effects on the transition to upper secondary education2007In: From Origin to Destination.: Trends and Mechanisms in Social Stratification Research, Campus, Frankfurt a.M. and New York , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Andersson Rydell, Linus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nationell samordning av frågeunder­sökningar och längdsnittsstudier2014Report (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Goldthorpe, J.H.
    Social class, family background, and intergenerational mobility: A comment on Mcintosh and Munk2009In: European Economic Review, ISSN 0014-2921, E-ISSN 1873-572X, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 118-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    McIntosh and Munk claim that the class schema developed by Erikson and Goldthorpe lacks validity and should not be taken as a basis for studies of intergenerational social mobility. Their paper is founded on a serious misconception of why the schema is in fact used by sociologists in mobility research and, for this reason, their test of its validity is essentially misdirected. In addition, the test itself is not carried out in an appropriate way nor, it would seem, with data of adequate quality.

  • 17.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Goldthorpe, John H.
    Has social mobility in Britain decreased? Reconciling divergent findings on income and class mobility2010In: British Journal of Sociology, ISSN 0007-1315, E-ISSN 1468-4446, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 211-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social mobility has become a topic of central political concern. In political and also media circles it is widely believed that in Britain today mobility is in decline. However, this belief appears to be based on a single piece of research by economists that is in fact concerned with intergenerational income mobility: specifically, with the relation between family income and children's later earnings. Research by sociologists using the same data sources – the British birth cohort studies of 1958 and 1970 – but focusing on intergenerational class mobility does not reveal a decline either in total mobility rates or in underlying relative rates. The paper investigates these divergent findings. We show that they do not result from the use of different subsets of the data or of different analytical techniques. Instead, given the more stable and generally less fluid class mobility regime, it is the high level of income mobility of the 1958 cohort, rather than the lower level of the 1970 cohort, that is chiefly in need of explanation. Further analyses – including ones of the relative influence of parental class and of family income on children's educational attainment – suggest that the economists' finding of declining mobility between the two cohorts may stem, in part at least, from the fact that the family income variable for the 1958 cohort provides a less adequate measure of ‘permanent income’ than does that for the 1970 cohort. But, in any event, it would appear that the class mobility regime more fully captures the continuity in economic advantage and disadvantage that persists across generations.

  • 18.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Goldthorpe, John H.
    Income and Class Mobility Between Generations in Great Britain: The Problem of Divergent Findings from the Data-sets of Birth Cohort Studies2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Analyses based on the data-sets of British birth cohort studies have produced differing findings on trends in intergenerational income and intergenerational class mobility. As between a cohort born in 1958 and one born in 1970, income mobility appears to show a sharp decline, while class mobility remains essentially constant. We investigate how this divergence might be explained. We find no evidence that it results from the differing subsets of data that have been used. However, we show that for both birth cohorts a stronger association exists between father’s class and child’s class than between family income and child’s earnings (and likewise between father’s class and child’s educational qualifications than between family income and child’s qualifications) - and that these differences are especially marked in the case of the 1958 cohort. We therefore argue that it is the surprisingly weak influence exerted by the family income variable for this cohort in these - and other - respects that must be seen as crucial in accounting for the inter-cohort decrease in income mobility that shows up. We point to evidence that as between 1974 and 1986, the years when the family incomes of children in the two cohorts were determined, the transitory component of earnings fell, so that the one-shot measure of such income made at the earlier date will be a less good measure of permanent income than that made at the later date. We therefore suggest that, at least to some extent, the apparent decrease in income mobility may come about in this way. But even if the finding is taken at face value, it would still appear the case that the class mobility regime, as well as having greater temporal stability than the income mobility regime, tends also to be stricter in the sense of entailing a stronger intergenerational association between origins and destinations and one that thus more fully captures continuities in economic advantage and disadvantage.

  • 19.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Goldthorpe, John H.
    McIntosh and Munk's Supposed Test of the Validity of the E-G Class Schema: A Comment2007Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Goldthorpe, John H.
    Hällsten, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    No way back up from ratcheting down? A critique of the 'microclass' approach to the analysis of social mobility2012In: Acta Sociologica, ISSN 0001-6993, E-ISSN 1502-3869, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 211-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    'Microclasses', detailed occupational groups, have recently been suggested as being the basis of research in social stratification; occupations represent 'real' social groups in contrast to the purely 'nominal' categories of either 'big class' schemata or socio-economic status scales. The microclass approach in social mobility research has been applied in a recent paper, the authors claiming to show that a strong propensity exists for intergenerational occupational inheritance, and that such inheritance is the dominant factor in social reproduction and limits equality of opportunity. We model a larger version of the same Swedish dataset as used by these authors. We show: (i) that while with many occupational groups a marked degree of intergenerational inheritance occurs among men, such inheritance is far less apparent among women, and, for both men and women, accounts for less than half of the total association in the occupational mobility table; (ii) that the microclass approach does not deal in a theoretically consistent way with the remaining associational underlying patterns of occupational mobility, since appeal is made to the theoretically alien idea of 'socio-economic closeness'; and (iii) that a standard class approach, modified to account for occupational inheritance, can provide a more integrated understanding of patterns of immobility and mobility alike. We also give reasons for doubting whether it will prove possible to establish a theoretically consistent microclass approach to explaining intergenerational mobility propensities. Finally, on the basis of our empirical results and of the relevant philosophical literature, we argue that the microclass approach is unlikely to be helpful in addressing normative questions of equality of opportunity.

  • 21.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Goldthorpe, John H.
    Nuffield College, Oxford UK.
    Portocarero, Lucienne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Intergenerational class mobility and the convergence thesis: England, France and Sweden2010In: British Journal of Sociology, ISSN 0007-1315, E-ISSN 1468-4446, Vol. 61, no s1, p. 185-219Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Hällsten, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Goldthorpe, John H
    No way back up from ratcheting down?: A critique of the 'microclass' approach to the analysis of social mobility2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    ‘Microclasses’, detailed occupational groups, have recently been suggested as the basis ofresearch in social stratification; occupations represent ‘real’ social groups in contrast to thepurely ‘nominal’ categories of either ‘big class’ schemata or socioeconomic status scales. In arecent paper, Jonsson et al. apply the microclass approach in social mobility research. Theyclaim to show that a strong propensity exists for intergenerational occupational inheritance, andthat such inheritance is the dominant factor in social reproduction and limits equality ofopportunity. We model the same large-scale Swedish dataset as is used by these authors. Weshow (i) that while with many occupational groups a marked degree of intergenerationalinheritance occurs among men, such inheritance is far less apparent among women, and, forboth men and women, accounts for less than half of the total association in the occupationalmobility table; (ii) that the microclass approach does not deal in a theoretically consistent waywith the remaining association underlying patterns of occupational mobility since appeal is madeto the theoretically alien idea of ‘socioeconomic closeness’; and (iii) that a standard classapproach, modified to account for occupational inheritance, can provide a more integratedunderstanding of patterns of immobility and mobility alike. We also give reasons for doubting ifit will prove possible to establish a theoretically consistent microclass approach to explainingintergenerational mobility propensities. Finally, on the basis of our empirical results and of therelevant philosophical literature, we argue that the microclass approach is unlikely to be helpfulin addressing normative questions of equality of opportunity.

  • 23.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Finns viljan att tillvarata begåvningsreserven?2010In: Kritisk utbildningstidskrift (KRUT), ISSN 0347-5409, Vol. 1-2, no 137-138, p. 57-71Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Change in social selection to upper secondary school - primary and secondary effects in Sweden2010In: European Sociological Review, ISSN 0266-7215, E-ISSN 1468-2672, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 291-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inequality of educational opportunity (IEO) depends on two separate mechanisms: children from advantaged social backgrounds perform better at school—primary effects—and tend more than others to choose to continue in education—secondary effects. IEO in the transition from compulsory to academic upper secondary education has earlier been shown to have decreased in Sweden since the middle of the 20th century. We investigate whether this change can be accounted for by changing primary or secondary effects, or perhaps by both. The analysis is based on longitudinal data for six cohorts of children, born from 1948 to 1982. Primary and secondary effects are separated both by grade point averages and cognitive test results. The estimation of the effects is based on the comparison of actual and counterfactual transitions among children from different social classes. Results show that the decrease in IEO overall seems to be related to corresponding changes in the primary and secondary effects. Secondary effects are greater when the separation is based on cognitive ability tests rather than grades and we end by discussing the consequences of this observation for the separation of primary and secondary effects.

  • 25.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Den sociala selektionen i utbildningssystemet: i Resultatdialog 2008: Forskning inom utbildningsvetenskap2008Report (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rudolphi, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Social snedrekrytering till teoretisk gymnasieutbildning2011In: Utvärdering Genom Uppföljning.:  Longitudinell individforskning under ett halvt sekel / [ed] Allan Svensson, Göteborg: Acta Universitatis Gothoburgensis, 2011, p. 205-225Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Torssander, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Clerics die, doctors survive - A note on death risks among highly educated professionals2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 37, p. 227-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Mortality is strongly associated with education. We present relative death risks of men and women in 12 educational/ occupational groups in Sweden today, with a focus on individuals with higher education. Methods: Results from Cox regressions are reported for 12 educational groups with special emphasis on those with professional education, e.g. clerics, physicians, people with medical PhDs, and university teachers. The study is based on register data of the total Swedish population in the age group of 30–64 (n¼3,734,660). Results: There is a considerable variation in mortality between educational groups. Men with compulsory education run a risk that is more than three times higher than that of professors outside medicine, and other educational groups fall in between. Medical doctors and physicians have relatively low death risks compared to those with compulsory education – less than 50% among men and less than 60% among women – although professors in medicine deviate by having higher risks than their colleagues in other subjects. Those with a theological exam show higher risks of dying during the follow-up period compared to others of a similar educational level. Professors outside medicine experience the lowest death risks of all identified groups. Conclusions: Men and women with a professional education have comparatively low death risks, particularly low among medical doctors and university employees, while the clergy seems to experience relatively higher death risks than others with a similar level of education. These patterns may reflect the effects of education as well as the selection of men and women to higher education.

  • 28.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Torssander, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Marital Partner and Mortality: The Effects of the Social Positions of Both Spouses2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Individual education, social class, social status and income are all associated with mortality, and this is likewise the case for the position of the marital partner. We investigate the combined effect on mortality of own and partner's positions regarding these four factors.

    Methods Prospective follow-up of information in the 1990 Census of the Swedish population aged 30-59 (N=1 502 148). Data on all-cause mortality and deaths from cancer and circulatory disease for the period 1991-2003 were collected from the Cause of Death Register. Relative mortality risks were estimated by Cox regression.

    Results All-cause mortality of both men and women differs by women's education and status and by men's social class and income. Men's education has an effect on their own mortality but not on their partner's, when other factors are included in the models. Women's education and men's social class are particularly important for women's deaths from circulatorydiseases.

    Conclusions The partner's social position has a clear effect on individual mortality, and women's education seems to be particularly important. The results appear above all to support hypotheses about the importance of lifestyle and economic resources for socio-economic differences in mortality.

  • 29.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Torssander, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Samhällshierarki och livslängd2008Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Erikson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Torssander, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Social class and cause of death2008In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 473-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous studies have shown that causes of death differ in their relationship to social class, but we lack a more comprehensive description of this variation. The present study provides a detailed and extensive list of social class differences for a large number of specific causes of death.

    Methods: All deaths between 1991 and 2003 in Sweden were linked with information on household social class from 1990. Relative death risks and excess mortality in groups of causes according to the European shortlist were estimated separately for men and women in eight classes using Cox Regression.

    Results: A clear mortality gradient among employees was found for the majority of causes, from low-relative death risks among higher managerial and professional occupations to relatively high risks for the unskilled working class. There is considerable variation in the strength of the association, from causes such as malignant melanoma, breast cancer and transport accidents among women, where no clear class differences were found. At the other extreme, mental and behavioural disorders, endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases and diseases of the respiratory system all show steep slopes for both men and women. Circulatory diseases and cancer together account for 15–20% of excess mortality.

    Conclusions: Exceptions to the general pattern—causes of death in which higher social classes are exposed to greater death risks or in which there is no mortality gradient—are practically non-existent. There is nevertheless significant variation in the strength of the class differences in specific causes.

  • 31. Jackson, M.
    et al.
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Goldthorpe, J.H.
    Yaish, M.
    Primary and Secondary Effects in Class Differentials in Educational Attainment:: the Transition to A-Level Courses in England and Wales2007In: Acta Sociologica, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 211-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sweden: Why Educational Expansion is Not Such a Great Strategy for Equality: Theory and Evidence2007In: Stratification in Higher Education: A Comparative Study, Stanford University Press , 2007, p. 113-139Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Modin, Bitte
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Intergenerational continuity in school performance: do grandparents matter?2013In: European Sociological Review, ISSN 0266-7215, E-ISSN 1468-2672, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 858-870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate whether present-day ninth grade students with top marks in Swedish and mathematics tend to descend from grandparents who did well in these school-subjects too. We also examine the extent to which such inheritance is domain-specific and works through the educational attainment of the previous two generations. The study is based on grandsons (n = 6,110) and granddaughters (n = 5,658) of subjects born in Uppsala 1915–1929. Results show that the odds of students receiving top marks in mathematics and Swedish tend to increase the higher the marks their grandparents achieved in these subjects. However, associations differ by the specific school-subject and according to the gender-specific intergenerational line of transmission. In broad terms, our results indicate that grandfathers are important for the transmission of mathematical and linguistic ability to their granddaughters and grandsons. Grandmothers appear to play a smaller role in the transmission of abilities, with the distinct exception of the transmission of linguistic ability from maternal grandmothers to their granddaughters. The fact that associations vary quite strongly according to type of ability and the gender-specific line of intergenerational transmission implies that we should be looking to historical context and learning environments rather than to a simple genetic transmission model to explain our findings.

  • 34. Nolan, Brian
    et al.
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    "Intragenerational Income Mobility: Poverty Dynamics in Industrial Societies"2007In: Moving out of Poverty: Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives on Mobility, Palgrave Macmillan and the World Bank , 2007, p. 127-164Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Rudolphi, Frida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Social selection in formal and informal tracking in Sweden2016In: Secondary education models and social inequality: an international comparison / [ed] Hans-Peter Blossfeld, Sandra Buchholz, Jan Skopek, Moris Triventi, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, p. 165-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Smeeding, Timothy M.
    et al.
    the Institute for Research on Poverty and Distinguished Professor of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin–Madison..
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Introduction2011In: Persistence, Privilege, and Parenting: The Comparative Study of Intergenerational Mobility / [ed] Timothy M Smeeding, Robert Erikson, and Markus Jäntti, New York: Russell Sage Foundation , 2011, p. 1-25Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Smeeding, Timothy M.
    et al.
    Institute for Research on Poverty and Distinguished Professor of Public Affairs at the University of Wisconsin–Madison..
    Erikson, RobertStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).Jäntti, MarkusStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Persistence, Privilege, and Parenting:  The Comparative Study of Intergenerational Mobility2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Torssander, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Martial partner and mortality: The effects of the social positions of both spouses2009In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 63, p. 992-998Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dimensions of the individual socioeconomic position-education, social class, social status and income-are associated with mortality. Inequalities in death also related to the social position of the household. It is, however, less clear how the socioeconomic position of one marital/cohabiting partner influences the mortality of the other partner. We examine the independent effect on mortality of own and partner's positions regarding these four socioeconomic factors. Methods: Register data on education, social class, social status and income of both marital/cohabiting partners were collected from the 1990 Census of the employed Swedish population aged 30-59 (N = 1 502 148). Data on all-cause mortality and deaths from cancer and circulatory disease for the subsequent period 1991-2003 were collected from the Cause of Death Register. Relative mortality risks for different socioeconomic groups were estimated by Cox regression. Results: All-cause mortality of both men and women differs by women's education and status and by men's social class and income. For men, the wife's education is more important for the mortality risk than his own education when the man's social class is included in the model. For women, the husband's social class yields larger mortality differences than own occupational measures. Women's education and men's social class and income are particularly important for women's deaths from circulatory diseases. Conclusion: The partner's social position has a clear independent association with individual mortality, and women's education and men's social class seem to be particularly important. Suggested explanations of health inequality are not always compatible with the observed relationship between partners' social and economic resources and mortality.

  • 39.
    Torssander, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Stratification and Mortality - A Comparison of Education, Class, Status and Income2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In many analyses of social inequality in health, different dimensions of social stratification have been used more or less interchangeably as measures of the individual’s general social standing. This procedure, however, has been questioned in previous studies, most of them comparing education, class and/or income. In the present article, the importance of education and income as well as two aspects of occupation – class and status – are examined. The results are based on register data and refer to all Swedish employees in the age range 35-59 years. There are clear gradients in total death risk for all socioeconomic factors except for income from work among women. The size of the independent effects of education, class, status and income differ between men and women. For both sexes, there are clear net associations between education and mortality. Class and income show independent effects on mortality only for men and status shows an independent effect only for women. While different stratification dimensions – education, social class, income, status – all can be used to show a “social gradient” with mortality, each of them seems to have a specific effect in addition to the general effect related to the stratification of society for either men or women.

  • 40.
    Torssander, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Stratification and Mortality: A comparison of education, class, status and income2010In: European Sociological Review, ISSN 0266-7215, E-ISSN 1468-2672, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 465-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many analyses of social inequality in health, different dimensions of social stratification have been used more or less interchangeably as measures of the individual's general social standing. This procedure, however, has been questioned in previous studies, most of them comparing education, class, and/or income. In this article, the importance of education and income as well as two aspects of occupation—class and status—is examined. The results are based on register data and refer to all Swedish employees in the age range 35–59 years. There are clear gradients in total death risk for all socioeconomic factors except income from work among women. The size of the independent effects of education, class, status, and income differ between men and women. For both sexes, there are clear net associations between education and mortality. Class and income show independent effects on mortality only for men and status shows an independent effect only for women. While different stratification dimensions—education, social class, income, status—all can be used to show a ‘social gradient’ with mortality, each of them seems to have a specific effect in addition to the general effect related to the stratification of society for either men or women.

1 - 40 of 40
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