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  • 1. Bräutigam, Lars
    et al.
    Pudelko, Linda
    Jemth, Ann-Sofie
    Gad, Helge
    Narwal, Mohit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gustafsson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Karsten, Stella
    Carreras Puigvert, Jordi
    Homan, Evert
    Berndt, Carsten
    Warpman Berglund, Ulrika
    Stenmark, Pål
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Helleday, Thomas
    Hypoxic Signaling and the Cellular Redox Tumor Environment Determine Sensitivity to MTH1 Inhibition2016In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 76, no 8, p. 2366-2375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer cells are commonly in a state of redox imbalance that drives their growth and survival. To compensate for oxidative stress induced by the tumor redox environment, cancer cells upregulate specific nononcogenic addiction enzymes, such as MTH1 (NUDT1), which detoxifies oxidized nucleotides. Here, we show that increasing oxidative stress in nonmalignant cells induced their sensitization to the effects of MTH1 inhibition, whereas decreasing oxidative pressure in cancer cells protected against inhibition. Furthermore, we purified zebrafish MTH1 and solved the crystal structure of MTH1 bound to its inhibitor, highlighting the zebrafish as a relevant tool to study MTH1 biology. Delivery of 8-oxo-dGTP and 2-OH-dATP to zebrafish embryos was highly toxic in the absence of MTH1 activity. Moreover, chemically or genetically mimicking activated hypoxia signaling in zebrafish revealed that pathologic upregulation of the HIF1 alpha response, often observed in cancer and linked to poor prognosis, sensitized embryos to MTH1 inhibition. Using a transgenic zebrafish line, in which the cellular redox status can be monitored in vivo, we detected an increase in oxidative pressure upon activation of hypoxic signaling. Pretreatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine protected embryos with activated hypoxia signaling against MTH1 inhibition, suggesting that the aberrant redox environment likely causes sensitization. In summary, MTH1 inhibition may offer a general approach to treat cancers characterized by deregulated hypoxia signaling or redox imbalance.

  • 2.
    Carter, Megan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Jemth, Ann-Sofie
    Hagenkort, Anna
    Page, Brent D. G.
    Gustafsson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Griese, Julia J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gad, Helge
    Valerie, Nicholas C. K.
    Desroses, Matthieu
    Boström, Johan
    Berglund, Ulrika Warpman
    Helleday, Thomas
    Stenmark, Pål
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Crystal structure, biochemical and cellular activities demonstrate separate functions of MTH1 and MTH22015In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, article id 7871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deregulated redox metabolism in cancer leads to oxidative damage to cellular components including deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs). Targeting dNTP pool sanitizing enzymes, such as MTH1, is a highly promising anticancer strategy. The MTH2 protein, known as NUDT15, is described as the second human homologue of bacterial MutT with 8-oxo-dGTPase activity. We present the first NUDT15 crystal structure and demonstrate that NUDT15 prefers other nucleotide substrates over 8-oxo-dGTP. Key structural features are identified that explain different substrate preferences for NUDT15 and MTH1. We find that depletion of NUDT15 has no effect on incorporation of 8-oxo-dGTP into DNA and does not impact cancer cell survival in cell lines tested. NUDT17 and NUDT18 were also profiled and found to have far less activity than MTH1 against oxidized nucleotides. We show that NUDT15 is not a biologically relevant 8-oxo-dGTPase, and that MTH1 is the most prominent sanitizer of the cellular dNTP pool known to date.

  • 3. Gad, Helge
    et al.
    Svensson, Linda M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Saleh, Aljona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Berntsson, Ronnie P.-A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gustafsson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Johansson, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Djureinovic, Tatjana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology.
    Häggblad, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Martens, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Lundgren, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Granelli, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Stenmark, Pål
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Helleday, Thomas
    MTH1 inhibition eradicates cancer by preventing sanitation of the dNTP pool2014In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 508, no 7495, p. 215-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancers have dysfunctional redox regulation resulting in reactive oxygen species production, damaging both DNA and free dNTPs. The MTH1 protein sanitizes oxidized dNTP pools to prevent incorporation of damaged bases during DNA replication. Although MTH1 is non-essential in normal cells, we show that cancer cells require MTH1 activity to avoid incorporation of oxidized dNTPs, resulting in DNA damage and cell death. We validate MTH1 as an anticancer target in vivo and describe small molecules TH287 and TH588 as first-in-class nudix hydrolase family inhibitors that potently and selectively engage and inhibit the MTH1 protein in cells. Protein co-crystal structures demonstrate that the inhibitors bind in the active site of MTH1. The inhibitors cause incorporation of oxidized dNTPs in cancer cells, leading to DNA damage, cytotoxicity and therapeutic responses in patient-derived mouse xenografts. This study exemplifies the non-oncogene addiction concept for anticancer treatment and validates MTH1 as being cancer phenotypic lethal.

  • 4.
    Gustafsson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Structural and functional studies of proteins of medical relevance: Protein-ligand complexes in cancer and novel structural folds in bacteria2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    X-ray crystallography is a tool for determining the structures of proteins and protein-ligand complexes. In this thesis the method has been employed to study several proteins of medical relevance.

    Cancer is a terrible disease, severely impacting those affected, as well as their family and friends. Current cancer treatments involve a combination of cytostatic drugs, surgery and radiation treatment. Unfortunately many cytostatic drugs also kill healthy cells, which gives rise to serious side-effects. The discovery of treatments which selectively inhibit proteins essential for cancer cell survival but which are non-essential in normal cells, could reduce such side-effects.

    MTH1 is a protein that degrades oxidised nucleotides, which when incorporated into DNA cause mutations and subsequent cell death. Cancer cells have higher levels of reactive oxygen species, which create oxidised nucleotides.  In Paper I it was discovered that cancer cells are dependent on MTH1 for their survival. Crystal structures of MTH1 in complex with small molecules guided their development into potent MTH1 inhibitors, capable of killing cancer cells. Cells with increased amounts of oxidised nucleotides, or with induced hypoxia, were more susceptible to MTH1 inhibition, as shown in Paper II. In Paper III several MTH1 orthologues from organisms often used in pre-clinical studies were tested for MTH1 inhibition. Leucine 116 of mouse MTH1 was determined to be important for the lower inhibition of the developed inhibitors towards this enzyme. A virtual fragment screening study using commercial chemicals resulted in several potent MTH1 inhibitors, as shown in Paper IV. The crystal structures with the fragments or optimised inhibitors did in most cases agree with the docking pose determined from the virtual screening. In addition to the known function of MTH1 in the degradation of oxidised nucleotides, Paper V showed that MTH1 also degrades methylated nucleotides.

    MTHFD2 is responsible for providing one-carbon units for nucleotide synthesis in cancer cells. As MTHFD2 is present in cancer cells but not in healthy cells, targeting the enzyme would make it possible to selectively kill cancer cells. Paper VI presents the first structure of MTHFD2, along with the first inhibitor of the protein. This information provides a starting point for the development of potent and selective MTHFD2 inhibitors.

    The botulinum neurotoxin from the bacterium Clostridium Botulinum is the causative agent of the deadly disease botulism. The action of the botulinum neurotoxin on nerve cells results in paralysis, and is life-threatening if the patient is not helped with breathing support. However, low doses of the neurotoxin are used as a successful treatment for several medical conditions, such as involuntary spasms. In Paper VII the structure of two proteins, P47 and OrfX2, encoded in the gene cluster of a botulinum neurotoxin, were determined. The structures resembled tubular lipid-binding proteins, previously only found in eukaryotes. The proteins were also found to be able to bind lipids. This work gives new insight into the structure and function of this group of proteins, which help the deadly botulinum neurotoxins.

  • 5.
    Gustafsson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Berntsson, Ronnie P-A
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Sweden.
    Martínez-Carranza, Markel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    El Tekle, Geniver
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Odegrip, Richard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Johnson, Eric A.
    Stenmark, Pål
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Crystal structures of OrfX2 and P47 from a Botulinum neurotoxin OrfX-type gene cluster2017In: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, E-ISSN 1873-3468, Vol. 591, no 22, p. 3781-3792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Botulinum neurotoxins are highly toxic substances and are all encoded together with one of two alternative gene clusters, the HA or the OrfX gene cluster. Very little is known about the function and structure of the proteins encoded in the OrfX gene cluster, which in addition to the toxin contains five proteins (OrfX1, OrfX2, OrfX3, P47, and NTNH). We here present the structures of OrfX2 and P47, solved to 2.1 and 1.8 Å, respectively. We show that they belong to the TULIP protein superfamily, which are often involved in lipid binding. OrfX1 and OrfX2 were both found to bind phosphatidylinositol lipids.

  • 6.
    Gustafsson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Jemth, Ann-Sofie
    Gustafsson, Nina M. S.
    Färnegårdh, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Loseva, Olga
    Wiita, Elisée
    Bonagas, Nadilly
    Dahllund, Leif
    Llona-Minguez, Sabin
    Häggblad, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Henriksson, Martin
    Andersson, Yasmin
    Homan, Evert
    Helleday, Thomas
    Stenmark, Pal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Crystal Structure of the Emerging Cancer Target MTHFD2 in Complex with a Substrate-Based Inhibitor2017In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 77, no 4, p. 937-948Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To sustain their proliferation, cancer cells become dependent on one-carbon metabolism to support purine and thymidylate synthesis. Indeed, one of the most highly upregulated enzymes during neoplastic transformation is MTHFD2, a mitochondrial methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase and cyclohydrolase involved in one-carbon metabolism. Because MTHFD2 is expressed normally only during embryonic development, it offers a disease-selective therapeutic target for eradicating cancer cells while sparing healthy cells. Here we report the synthesis and preclinical characterization of the first inhibitor of human MTHFD2. We also disclose the first crystal structure of MTHFD2 in complex with a substrate-based inhibitor and the enzyme cofactors NAD(+) and inorganic phosphate. Our work provides a rationale for continued development of a structural framework for the generation of potent and selective MTHFD2 inhibitors for cancer treatment.

  • 7.
    Gustafsson, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Zhang, Sicai
    Masuyer, Geoffrey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Dong, Min
    Stenmark, Pål
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Crystal Structure of Botulinum Neurotoxin A2 in Complex with the Human Protein Receptor SV2C Reveals Plasticity in Receptor Binding2018In: Toxins, ISSN 2072-6651, E-ISSN 2072-6651, Vol. 10, no 4, article id 153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are a family of highly dangerous bacterial toxins, with seven major serotypes (BoNT/A-G). Members of BoNTs, BoNT/A1 and BoNT/B1, have been utilized to treat an increasing number of medical conditions. The clinical trials are ongoing for BoNT/A2, another subtype of BoNT/A, which showed promising therapeutic properties. Both BoNT/A1 and BoNT/A2 utilize three isoforms of synaptic vesicle protein SV2 (SV2A, B, and C) as their protein receptors. We here present a high resolution (2.0 angstrom) co-crystal structure of the BoNT/A2 receptor-binding domain in complex with the human SV2C luminal domain. The structure is similar to previously reported BoNT/A-SV2C complexes, but a shift of the receptor-binding segment in BoNT/A2 rotates SV2C in two dimensions giving insight into the dynamic behavior of the interaction. Small differences in key residues at the binding interface may influence the binding to different SV2 isoforms, which may contribute to the differences between BoNT/A1 and BoNT/A2 observed in the clinic.

  • 8.
    Hamark, Christoffer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Berntsson, Ronnie P. -A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Masuyer, Geoffrey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Henriksson, Linda M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gustafsson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Stenmark, Pål
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Glycans Confer Specificity to the Recognition of Ganglioside Receptors by Botulinum Neurotoxin A2017In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 139, no 1, p. 218-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The highly poisonous botulinum neurotoxins, produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum, act on their hosts by a high-affinity association to two receptors on neuronal cell surfaces as the first step of invasion. The glycan motifs of gangliosides serve as initial coreceptors for these protein complexes, whereby a membrane protein receptor is bound. Herein we set out to characterize the carbohydrate minimal binding epitope of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A. By means of ligand-based NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, computer simulations, and isothermal titration calorimetry, a screening of ganglioside analogues together with a detailed characterization of various carbohydrate ligand complexes with the toxin were accomplished. We show that the representation of the glycan epitope to the protein affects the details of binding. Notably, both branches of the oligosaccharide GD la can associate to botulinum neurotoxin serotype A when expressed as individual trisaccharides. It is, however, the terminal branch of GD1a as well as this trisaccharide motif alone, corresponding to the sialyl-Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen, that represents the active ligand epitope, and these compounds bind to the neurotoxin with a high degree of predisposition but with low affinities. This finding does not correlate with the oligosaccharide moieties having a strong contribution to the total affinity, which was expected to be the case. We here propose that the glycan part of the ganglioside receptors mainly provides abundance and specificity, whereas the interaction with the membrane itself and protein receptor brings about the strong total binding of the toxin to the neuronal membrane.

  • 9.
    Hamark, Christoffer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Berntsson, Ronnie Per-Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gustafsson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Svensson, Linda M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Stenmark, Pål
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Recognition of Ganglioside Receptors by Botulinum Neurotoxin AManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10. Jemth, Ann-Sofie
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Bräutigam, Lars
    Henriksson, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Desroses, Matthieu
    Carreras Puigvert, Jordi
    Homan, Evert
    Warpman Berglund, Ulrika
    Stenmark, Pål
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Helleday, Thomas
    MutT homologue 1 (MTH1) catalyses the hydrolysis of mutagenic O6-methyl-dGTPManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Narwal, Mohit
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Jemth, Ann-Sofie
    Gustafsson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Almlöf, Ingrid
    Warpman Berglund, Ulrika
    Helleday, Thomas
    Stenmark, Pål
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Crystal Structures and Inhibitor Interactions of Mouse and Dog MTH1 Reveal Species-Specific Differences in Affinity2018In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 593-603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MTH1 hydrolyzes oxidized nucleoside triphosphates, thereby sanitizing the nucleotide pool from oxidative damage. This prevents incorporation of damaged nucleotides into DNA, which otherwise would lead to mutations and cell death. The high level of reactive oxygen species in cancer cells leads to a higher level of oxidized nucleotides in cancer cells compared to non-malignant cells making cancer cells more dependent on MTH1 for survival. The possibility to specifically target cancer cells by inhibiting MTH1 has highlighted MTH1 as a promising cancer target. Progression of MTH1 inhibitors into the clinic requires animal studies and knowledge about species differences in potency of inhibitors are of vital importance. We here show that the human MTH1 inhibitor TH588 is approximately twenty fold less potent for inhibition of mouse MTH1 compared to human, rat, pig, and dog MTH1. We present the crystal structures of mouse MTH1 in complex with TH588 and dog MTH1and elucidate the structural and sequence basis for the observed difference in affinity for TH588. We identify amino acid residue 116 in MTH1 as an important determinant for TH588 affinity. Furthermore, we present the structure of mouse MTH1 in complex with the substrate 8-oxo-dGTP. The crystal structures provide insight into the high degree of structural conservation between MTH1 from different organisms and provide a detailed view of interactions between MTH1 and the inhibitor, revealing that minute structural differences can have a large impact on affinity and specificity.

  • 12.
    Rudling, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gustafsson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Almlöf, Ingrid
    Homan, Evert
    Scobie, Martin
    Warpman Berglund, Ulrika
    Helleday, Thomas
    Stenmark, Pål
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Carlsson, Jens
    Fragment-Based Discovery and Optimization of Enzyme Inhibitors by Docking of Commercial Chemical Space2017In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 60, no 19, p. 8160-8169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fragment-based lead discovery has emerged as a leading drug development strategy for novel therapeutic targets. Although fragment-based drug discovery benefits immensely from access to atomic-resolution information, structure-based virtual screening has rarely been used to drive fragment discovery and optimization. Here, molecular docking of 0.3 million fragments to a crystal structure of cancer target MTH1 was performed. Twenty-two predicted fragment ligands, for which analogs could be acquired commercially, were experimentally evaluated. Five fragments inhibited MTH1 with IC50 values ranging from 6 to 79 mu M. Structure-based optimization guided by predicted binding modes and analogs from commercial chemical libraries yielded nanomolar inhibitors. Subsequently solved crystal structures confirmed binding modes predicted by docking for three scaffolds. Structure-guided exploration of commercial chemical space using molecular docking gives access to fragment libraries that are several orders of magnitude larger than those screened experimentally and can enable efficient optimization of hits to potent leads.

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