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  • 1. Ahlgren, Joakim
    et al.
    Grimvall, Anders
    Omstedt, Anders
    Rolff, Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre. Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment, Sweden.
    Wikner, Johan
    Temperature, DOC level and basin interactions explain the declining oxygen concentrations in the Bothnian Sea2017In: Journal of Marine Systems, ISSN 0924-7963, E-ISSN 1879-1573, Vol. 170, p. 22-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hypoxia and oxygen deficient zones are expanding worldwide. To properly manage this deterioration of the marine environment, it is important to identify the causes of oxygen declines and the influence of anthropogenic activities. Here, we provide a study aiming to explain the declining oxygen levels in the deep waters of the Bothnian Sea over the past 20 years by investigating data from environmental monitoring programmes. The observed decline in oxygen concentrations in deep waters was found to be primarily a consequence of water temperature increase and partly caused by an increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the seawater (R-Adj(2). = 0.83) as well as inflow from the adjacent sea basin. As none of the tested eutrophication-related predictors were significant according to a stepwise multiple regression, a regional increase in nutrient inputs to the area is unlikely to explain a significant portion of the oxygen decline. Based on the findings of this study, preventing the development of anoxia in the deep water of the Bothnian Sea is dependent on the large-scale measures taken to reduce climate change. In addition, the reduction of the nutrient load to the Baltic Proper is required to counteract the development of hypoxic and phosphate-rich water in the Baltic Proper, which can form deep water in the Bothnian Sea. The relative importance of these sources to oxygen consumption is difficult to determine from the available data, but the results clearly demonstrate the importance of climate related factors such as temperature, DOC and inflow from adjacent basins for the oxygen status of the sea.

  • 2.
    Bonaglia, Stefano
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
    Broman, Elias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre.
    Brindefalk, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Hedlund, Erika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Hjorth, Tomas
    Rolff, Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre.
    Nascimento, Francisco J. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre.
    Udekwu, Klas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Gunnarsson, Jonas S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Activated carbon stimulates microbial diversity and PAH biodegradation under anaerobic conditions in oil-polluted sediments2020In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 248, article id 126023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biodegradation by microorganisms is a useful tool that helps alleviating hydrocarbon pollution in nature. Microbes are more efficient in degradation under aerobic than anaerobic conditions, but the majority of sediment by volume is generally anoxic. Incubation experiments were conducted to study the biodegradation potential of naphthalene-a common polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-and the diversity of microbial communities in presence/absence of activated carbon (AC) under aerobic/anaerobic conditions. Radio-respirometry experiments with endogenous microorganisms indicated that degradation of naphthalene was strongly stimulated (96%) by the AC addition under anaerobic conditions. In aerobic conditions, however, AC had no effects on naphthalene biodegradation. Bioaugmentation tests with cultured microbial populations grown on naphthalene showed that AC further stimulated (92%) naphthalene degradation in anoxia. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences implied that sediment amendment with AC increased microbial community diversity and changed community structure. Moreover, the relative abundance of Geobacter, Thiobacillus, Sulfuricurvum, and methanogenic archaea increased sharply after amendment with AC under anaerobic conditions. These results may be explained by the fact that AC particles promoted direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) between microorganisms involved in PAH degradation pathways. We suggest that important ecosystem functions mediated by microbes-such as hydrocarbon degradation-can be induced and that AC enrichment strategies can be exploited for facilitating bioremediation of anoxic oil-contaminated sediments and soils.

  • 3.
    Larsson, Ulf
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Nyberg, Svante
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Zakrisson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Hajdu, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Elmgren, Ragnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Walve, Jakob
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Rolff, Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre.
    Baltic Sea phytoplankton: Long-term variability of major groups and primary production in spring and summer related to nutrients and temperatureManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Rolff, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre.
    Elfwing, Tina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre.
    Increasing nitrogen limitation in the Bothnian Sea, potentially caused by inflow of phosphate-rich water from the Baltic Proper2015In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 601-611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study showed that the open water of the Bothnian Sea (BS) is likely to have shifted from altering nitrogen and phosphorous limitations of the spring bloom to more nitrogen-limited conditions during the last 20 years. This is affected by the by inflow of phosphate-rich and oxygen-depleted water from depths near the halocline in the northern Baltic Proper, where severe oxygen conditions currently cause extreme phosphate concentrations in the deep water. The change in relation between inorganic nitrogen and phosphorous in the BS occurs first in the deep water and then progresses to the surface water. The change can potentially cause increased production in the BS and more frequent cyanobacterial blooms. There does not appear to be any immediate concern in the short-term perspective for the state of the BS, but a progression of the processes may lead to a more eutrophic state of the BS.

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