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  • 1. Sepahvand, Mohammad H.
    et al.
    Shahbazian, Roujman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Individual’s Risk Attitudes in sub-Saharan Africa: Determinants and Reliability of Self-reported Risk in Burkina Faso2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Risk taking is an important topic in Africa, as access to financial institutions and social security is scarce. Data on risk attitudes in Africa is limited and the available data collected might not be reliable. We investigate the determinants of risk attitudes and the reliability of survey data in a sub-Saharan country, like Burkina Faso. Using a large representative panel survey of 31 677 individuals, we analyze the determinants and the test-retest reliability for different risk attitudes in general, traffic and financial matters. Our results show that determinants such as individual’s sex and age are significantly associated with willingness to take risk. Women have more reliable risk measures compared to men, older individuals have more reliable risk measures than younger individuals and those with high education exhibit a higher reliability in terms of their self-reported risk attitude compared to people with low education. Reliability differs across risk attitudes; risk-taking in traffic has the highest test-retest reliability followed by willingness to take risk in general and financial matters.

  • 2. Sepahvand, Mohammad H.
    et al.
    Shahbazian, Roujman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Intergenerational Transmission of Risk Attitudes: The Role of Gender, Parents and Grandparents in Burkina Faso2017Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the intergenerational transmission of risk attitudes for three risk domains in Burkina Faso. First, our results shows a strong transmission of attitudes from parents to children. Although, estimates from intergenerational transmission of risk attitudes in developing countries should not be compared directly with those from developed countries, our results goes in the same direction as previous literature from Germany. That is risk attitudes are transmitted from; parents to children, local enviorment to children and positive assortative mating of parents strengthens the parents’ transmission of attitudes to her child. Second we analyze three generations of risk attitude transmission. Our results indicates that it exist a transmission of risk attitudes from grandparents to their grandchildren. The strength and significance of this socialization decreases when we control for parents risk attitudes. Third, since there are strong gender roles in Burkina Faso, we test if mothers and fathers transmission of risk attitudes on their daughter is the same as on their son. We find that mother’s transmission of risk attitudes is stronger on their daughters than sons. For fathers the pattern is reverse. However, our findings show that it exist a heterogenity in the transmission of risk attitudes in male and female dominated risk domains. This gives support for the gender-specific role model hypothesis in terms of risk attitudes.

  • 3. Sepahvand, Mohammad H.
    et al.
    Shahbazian, Roujman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sibling Correlation in Risk Attitudes: Evidence from Burkina Faso2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study uses sibling correlation to investigate the importance of parental and household characteristics on three different risk domains collected in a nationally representative survey from Burkina Faso. Sibling correlations are between 0.51 and 0.83. The correlations are higher in the general risk domain compared to risk taking in financial matters and traffic. Moreover, the sibling correlation is higher for the younger generation of siblings than the older generation, and for sisters than brothers. We also explore which factors drive these correlations; parents’ risk attitudes help explain these correlations, whereas socioeconomic outcomes, family structure, parental health and residential zone have only a limited contribution. We also find that gender is important in explaining the variation in sibling correlations. Mother’s have a stronger contribution on daughter’s correlation than fathers, whereas fathers help to explain the son’s correlation to a larger extent.

  • 4. Sepahvand, Mohammad H.
    et al.
    Shahbazian, Roujman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Bali Swain, Ranjula
    Does revolution change risk attitudes? Evidence from Burkina Faso2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A popular uprising in 2014, led to a revolution overthrowing the sitting president of Burkina Faso. We investigate if individuals’ risk attitudes changed due to this revolution. Specifically, we investigate the impact of the revolution on risk attitudes, by gender, age and level of education. The analysis is based on a unique nationally representative panel Household Budget Survey, which allows us to track the changes in the risk attitudes of the same individuals before, during and after the revolution. Our results suggest that the impact of the revolution is short-term. Individuals become risk averse during the revolution but converge back to the pre-revolution risk attitudes, slightly increasing their risk taking, after the revolution is over. Women are more risk taking than the men after the revolution but are more risk averse during the revolution. In general, older individuals tend to have higher risk aversion than the younger individuals.  During the revolution, however, the individuals with higher level of education are less willing to take risk.

  • 5.
    Shahbazian, Roujman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sex Composition, Birth Order and Spacing: A New Approach to Studying Gendered Sibling Effects on Adult OutcomeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Shahbazian, Roujman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sibling Configuration and Adulthood Outcomes: The Case of Two-Child Families2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis includes three empirical studies, analyzing how sibling configuration (i.e. birth order, birth spacing and sex-composition) influences siblings’ long-run income and educational choice. This is done by utilizing the unique linkage opportunities of administrative registers covering the entire population of Sweden.

    Study I: This paper focuses on how different birth spacing intervals are associated with income rank from ages 33 to 42 years, for siblings in two-child families. The results show clear differences between first- and second-born siblings. At the more common spacing intervals (less than 5 years), spacing has a negligible association to second-born children’s long-term income rank. However, first-born children have lower income rank when a younger sibling is born when they are very young. Having relatively high spacing intervals (over 5 years) is associated with somewhat lower long-term income-rank than having mid-length intervals for both first- and second-born siblings.

    Study II: This study focuses on the association between combinations of sibling configuration (i.e. birth order, birth spacing and sex composition) and long-run income rank of siblings. The results show that the significance of different family factors in two-child families vary by sibling sex-composition. The findings suggest that both birth order and birth spacing are important factors for first born boys independent of the younger sibling’s sex. First-born girls, however, only have an advantage if they have a younger sister. More surprisingly is that this advantage does not seem to vary by birth spacing.

    Study III: This study examines how sibling gender configuration in Swedish two-child families influences the choice of so-called STEM educational fields (i.e. Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics). The results show that younger siblings, net of parental characteristics, are more likely to choose a STEM field if their older sibling already has attended a STEM program. The findings indicate that boys’ choice of STEM fields is independent of having an older brother or sister who has attended a STEM program. However, girls seem to be more likely to choose a STEM-field if they have a sister who has attended a STEM program, than if they have a brother with a similar program. Given that STEM-fields are markedly male dominated, this indicate the importance of having a same-sex role model for making gender atypical educational choices.

  • 7.
    Shahbazian, Roujman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The Consequence of Birth Spacing for First- and Second-Born Siblings' Long-Term Income Rank: A Restrictive Two-Child Family ApproachManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Shahbazian, Roujman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Under the Influence of Our Older Brother and Sister: The Association between Sibling Gender Configuration and STEM DegreesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
1 - 8 of 8
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