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  • 1.
    Brandén, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Birkelund, Gunn Elisabeth
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Ethnic Composition of Schools and Students' Educational Outcomes: Evidence from Sweden2019In: The international migration review, ISSN 0197-9183, E-ISSN 1747-7379, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 486-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the impact of ethnic school composition on students' educational outcomes using Swedish population register data. We add to the literature on the consequences of ethnic school segregation for native and immigrant students by distinguishing social interaction effects from selection and environmental effects through one- and two-way fixed effects models. Our findings demonstrate that native and immigrant students' grades are relatively unaffected by social interaction effects stemming from the proportion of immigrant schoolmates. However, we find nontrivial effects on their eligibility for upper secondary school. Immigrants' educational outcomes are weakly positively affected by the proportion of co-ethnics in school.

  • 2.
    Bygren, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lindblom, Clara
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The more things change, the more they stay the same: a follow up of participants in Social Fund financed projects2014Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Every year in Sweden, over one hundred thousand job-seekers are assigned to local labour market policy measures, of which a large proportion are financed with money from the European Social Fund. But what do we actually know about the contents of these projects and their effects on the participants’ chances of getting a job? What could be done to improve this knowledge?  This report constitutes a follow-up of Labour Market Policies against the Odds (2014), which studied the labour market outcomes of job-seekers who had been assigned to Social Fund projects by the Swedish Public Employment Service. Here we go a step further and include all individuals who participated in a Social Fund project over a period of three years. The objective is to examine whether the participants’ participation in the projects improved their chances of getting a job or affected their subsequent incomes.We find relatively small – but transient – positive effects of participation in ESF-projects on employment chances and income from work. However, our sensitivity analyses indicate that even these small effects can be questioned. One of the important conclusions drawn in the report is that the opportunities for evaluating the effects of these projects are very limited. The available information on the contents of the projects is poor, and the projects have not been designed in a way that makes scientific evaluation possible. The report therefore concludes with recommendations that could improve the evaluability of Social Fund financed activities.

  • 3.
    Bygren, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Ethnic Environment during Childhood and the Educational Attainment of Immigrant Children in Sweden2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We ask whether growing up with persons of the same national background (which we refer to as coethnics), in the immediate neighbourhood, influences future educational careers of children of immigrants. We use administrative data to follow an entire cohort of immigrant children who graduated from Swedish compulsory schools in 1995. We have information on their parents and on their ethnic environment during the period they were 10 – 15 years old. The dependent variable studied is the highest completed education in years at age 24. We are able to account for unobserved heterogeneity with neighbourhood fixed effects and ethnic group fixed effects. We find that the effect of the quantitative side of the ethnic environment (the number of

    coethnics) on educational attainment is strongly conditioned by the qualitative side of this environment (the educational success of coethnics). The individual’s educational career is positively related to the number of young coethnics in the neighbourhood,

    but only if they can be characterized as being educationally successful. Growing up in a large ethnic community with average or poor educational success is harmful for the future educational success. The effect of the ethnic surrounding in the highest

    completed education is fully mediated by success in compulsory school.

  • 4.
    Bygren, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Using register data to estimate causal effects of interventions: An ex post synthetic control-group approach2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 45, no 17, p. 50-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: It is common in the context of evaluations that participants have not been selected on the basis of transparent participation criteria, and researchers and evaluators many times have to make do with observational data to estimate effects of job training programs and similar interventions. The techniques developed by researchers in such endeavours are useful not only to researchers narrowly focused on evaluations, but also to social and population science more generally, as observational data overwhelmingly are the norm, and the endogeneity challenges encountered in the estimation of causal effects with such data are not trivial. The aim of this article is to illustrate how register data can be used strategically to evaluate programs and interventions and to estimate causal effects of participation in these. Methods: We use propensity score matching on pretreatment-period variables to derive a synthetic control group, and we use this group as a comparison to estimate the employment-treatment effect of participation in a large job-training program. Results: We find the effect of treatment to be small and positive but transient. Conclusions: Our method reveals a strong regression to the mean effect, extremely easy to interpret as a treatment effect had a less advanced design been used (e.g. a within-subjects panel data analysis), and illustrates one of the unique advantages of using population register data for research purposes.

  • 5.
    Bygren, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lindblom, Clara
    Framgång eller återgång till det normala?: En uppföljning av deltagare i socialfondsfinansierade projekt2014Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Hultin, Mia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Mechanisms of Inequality: Unequal Access to Organizational Power and the Gender Wage Gap2000Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Hällsten, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Families, neighborhoods, and the future: The transition to adulthood of children of native and immigrant origin in Sweden2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we examine mechanisms that generate gaps in educational attainment and labor market outcomes between children of immigrants and children of native Swedes. Theoretical explanations of how social inequality between generations is (re)produced focus on a relative lack of resources within the family and/or in the broader social environment, particularly in neighborhoods and schools. In the empirical analyses we follow over time all individuals who completed compulsory school during the period 1990 -1995 and analyze what types of background factors have influenced their educational and labor market careers, which are measured for the year 2007. On the basis of our empirical results we conclude that the gaps between children of immigrants and children of native Swedes are mainly generated by differences in various forms of resources in the family of origin. The role of neighborhood segregation is less substantial. Moreover, our results indicate that the gaps in employment are larger than the corresponding gaps in educational attainment. When gainfully employed, children of immigrants born in Sweden follow roughly the same path as children from native families in contrast to children born abroad.

  • 8.
    Hällsten, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Crime as a Price of Inequality?: The Gap in Registered Crime between Childhood Immigrants, Children of Immigrants and Children of Native Swedes2013In: British Journal of Criminology, ISSN 0007-0955, E-ISSN 1464-3529, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 456-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the gap in registered crime between the children of immigrants and the children of native Swedes. We follow all individuals who completed compulsory schooling during the period 1990-93 in the Stockholm Metropolitan area (N = 63,462) up to their thirties and analyse how family of origin and neighbourhood segregation during adolescence, subsequent to arriving in Sweden, influence the gap in recorded crimes. For males, we are able to explain between half and three-quarters of the gap in crime by reference to parental socio-economic resources and neighbourhood segregation. For females, we can explain even more, sometimes the entire gap. In addition, we tentatively examine the role of co-nationality or culture by comparing the crime rates of randomly chosen pairs of individuals originating from the same country. We find only a small correlation in the crime of individuals who share the same origin, indicating that culture is unlikely to be a strong cause of crime among immigrants.

  • 9. Karlsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lindblom, Clara
    Bygren, Magnus
    Nya aktörer inom arbetsmarknadspolitiken: hur väl lyckas de och till vilken kostnad?2014Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    le Grand, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Permanent Disadvantage or Gradual Integration: Explaining the Immigrant-Native Earnings Gap in Sweden2000Report (Other academic)
  • 11.
    le Grand, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Tibajev, Andrey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Vid arbetslivets gränser: sysselsättning, matchning, barriärer 1974-20102013Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Hällsten, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Familjen, förorten och framtiden. Ungdomars inträde i vuxenlivet2009In: Från klass till organisation: en resa genom det sociala landskapet / [ed] Christine Roman & Lars Udehn, Malmö: Liber, 2009, 1, p. 269-293Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Jonsson, Jan O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ethnic Segregation and Educational Outcomes in Swedish Comprehensive Schools2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We ask whether ethnic density in Swedish comprehensive schools affect teacher-assigned school grades in ninth grade (age 16). The data, based on two entire cohorts who graduated in 1998 and 1999 (188,000 pupils and 1,043 schools), link school information with Census data on social origin, and enable us to distinguish first- from second generation immigrants.

    Using multilevel analysis we find the proportion of first, but not the second, generation immigrant pupils in a school to depress grades in general, but particularly for (first generation) immigrant pupils. Passing a threshold of more than 40 percent immigrants reduces grades with around a fifth of a standard deviation, affecting fourteen percent of immigrant children. Our main results are robust to model specifications which address omitted variable bias both at individual- and school-level. One policy implication of our results is that desegregation policies which concentrated on the two per cent most segregated schools would probably improve school results and reduce ethnic inequality.

  • 14.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    le Grand, Carl
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Skills and wages in the Swedish labour market: Structure and change 1968-20002006In: Japanese Journal of Northern European Studies, Vol. 3, p. 43-63Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 14 of 14
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  • nn-NO
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