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  • 1.
    Kjellsson, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Accumulated occupational class and self-rated health: Can information on previous experience of class further our understanding of the social gradient in health?2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown a social gradient in health that suggests that better health is found for people in more advantaged positions in society. This research has mainly been focused on the relationship between social position in childhood and health or current position and health. However, little is known about the impact of positions held in between these two time-points. In this paper a potentially lasting health effect of occupational class positions is explored. The study starts with a description of the work-life biographies for people in different current class positions. Then goes on to investigate if the effect of current class is modified when including previous positions during adulthood, as well as how much extra information is gained by utilizing information on individual work histories. An association between accumulated experience of manual working class and self-rated health is found. Also, when controlling for accumulated class experience, the social gradient for current class is no longer significant. Furthermore, even for non-manual employees the odds of reporting less than good self-rated health is increasing with each added year of previous manual experience. This suggests that the social gradient in health is more complex than just a matter of current social position influencing current health, and that the effects would potentially be modified if the full complexity of life-time social positions were taken into account.

  • 2.
    Kjellsson, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Accumulated occupational class and self-rated health. Can information on previous experience of class further our understanding of the social gradient in health?2013In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 81, p. 26-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has shown a social gradient in health with better health for people in more advantaged positions in society. This research has mainly been on the relationship between current position and health, or social position in childhood and health, but less is known about the potential accumulative impact of positions held in adulthood. In this paper I use the economic activity histories from the Swedish Level of Living survey to examine the relationship between accumulated occupational class positions and health. Step-wise linear probability models are used to investigate how to best capture the potential association between class experience and self-rated health (SRH), and whether the effect of current class is modified when measures of accumulated class are included. I then further test the potentially lasting association between previous exposure to the health risk of working class by analysing only individuals currently in higher or intermediate level service class; the classes under least exposure. I find a positive association between accumulated experiences of working class and less than good SRH. Furthermore, even for employees currently in non-manual positions the risk for less than good SRH increases with each added year of previous experience within working class. This suggests that the social gradient can be both accumulative and lasting, and that more information on the mechanisms of health disparities can be found by taking detailed information on peoples' pasts into account. Although gender differences in health are not a focus in this paper, results also indicate that the influence of class experiences on health might differ between men and women.

  • 3.
    Kjellsson, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Class-specific gender gaps in health: The role of gender and working conditions within classesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Kjellsson, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Class-specific gender gaps in musculoskeletal pain: Sweden 1974-2010: Have gender differences in pain changed over time and equally across social classes?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Kjellsson, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Class-specific gender gaps in musculoskeletal pain: Sweden 1974-2010: Have gender differences in pain changed over time and equally in all social classes2018Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Kjellsson, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ojämlikhet i hälsa : Vilken betydelse har social klass och kön?2014In: Ojämlikhetens dimensioner: uppväxtvillkor, arbete och hälsa i Sverige / [ed] Marie Evertsson, Charlotta Magnusson, Stockholm: Liber, 2014, p. 288-310Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Kjellsson, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sick of Work?: Questions of Class, Gender and Self-Rated Health2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines two aspects of social inequalities in health with three empirical studies that are based on the Swedish Level of Living survey (LNU): The relationship between accumulated occupational class positions during adulthood and health and the class-specific nature of gender differences in health. Previous research continuously finds that there are health differences by class and gender, but less is known about the extent to which accumulated class experiences in adulthood are related to health or how gender differences vary by class. The overall conclusion in this thesis is that occupational class experiences matters for health, both as historical and current experiences. Furthermore, the results highlight the importance of taking class into consideration when examining health differences between men and women, as the mechanisms that underlie the gender gaps in health are not necessarily the same for all classes. The studies can be outlined as:

    Study I: Class differences in working conditions is a mechanism that underlies class inequalities in health. The working class is generally more exposed to adverse working environments than non-manual employees, and when the wear and tear of these conditions accumulate over time, the length of this exposure may contribute to class inequalities in health. Thereby, accumulated time in the working class is studied as a partial explanation for class differences in health. The results suggest that the duration of time in the working class is related to a higher probability of less than good self-rated general health (SRH), given current class position. This association was also found among individuals who were no longer in working class positions and thus show that duration of experience matters, both as current and past experience.

    Study II: The study addresses the research gap of class-specificity in gender health inequality and seeks to further disentangle class and gender by studying gender gaps separately by class. The results show that there are class-specific gender gaps for both SRH and musculoskeletal pain, while the gender gap in psychiatric distress appears to be more general across class. Working conditions do not explain the between-class differences in gender gaps but contribute to specific gender differences in health within classes.

    Study III: The labour market has changed over time and has “upgraded” the class structure while at the same time the share of women in paid employment has increased. Therefore, female health may be increasingly influenced by occupational factors, such as working conditions. This study explores the class-specific nature of gender differences and investigates musculoskeletal pain and working conditions among employed men and women within classes during a time-period that spanned more than 30 years. There were class-specific gender gaps in health throughout the period. The gender gap has increased more, and is wider, among non-manual employees compared to the working classes. This development could not be explained by changes in working conditions.

  • 8.
    Kjellsson, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Magnusson, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Arbete, hälsa och genus: betydelsen av yrkets könssammansättning för kvinnors och mäns villkor i arbetslivet2014In: Jämställt arbete? Organisatoriska ramar och villkor i arbetslivet / [ed] Lena Abrahamsson, Lena Gonäs, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2014, p. 151-193Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 8 of 8
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