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  • 1.
    Ahmed, Engy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Holmström, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Soil Microorganisms and Mineral Weathering: Mechanics of Biotite Dissolution2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Soil microorganisms play an important role in the environment by contributing to leach and release of essential elements from soil minerals that are required not only for their own nutrition but also for plants growth. This study aims to compare between the mechanisms of different fungal and bacterial species isolated from podzol soil in biotite dissolution. Microplate devices with 6 wells were used for the biological weathering experiments. All of the sterilized microplate wells were filled with 4g/l of biotite followed by 12 ml of an iron free diluted mineral liquid medium. In these conditions, biotite particles are the only source of the essential elements for the microorganisms. To characterize the mechanisms of biotite dissolution, we monitored siderophores production, microbial biomass, pH, exchangeable cations concentration and SEM analysis for mineral surface. There was a significant difference between the behavior of the fungal and bacterial species in dissolution of biotite. This difference may be due to the variation of these microorganisms in their mechanics of interaction with mineral surface. It was observed also that these microorganisms directly and indirectly induce biotite dissolution. Defining soil as a system driven by biological mechanisms rather than chemical processes has major implications for our understanding of how the system functions and how it will respond to changing conditions.

  • 2.
    Ahmed, Engy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Holmström, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    THE MICROBE-MINERAL INTERACTIONS IN THE ACIDIC PODZOL SOIL2013In: Mineralogical magazine, ISSN 0026-461X, E-ISSN 1471-8022, Vol. 77, no 5, p. 564-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Iron is a key component of the chemical architecture of the biosphere. Due to the low bioavailability of iron in the environment, microorganisms have developed specific uptake strategies, like siderophores, which are operationally defined as low-molecular-mass biogenic Fe(III)-binding compounds, that can increase iron’s bioavailability by promoting the dissolution of iron-bearing minerals. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the composition of hydroxamate siderophores in the soil horizons of the acidic podzol, and study how they are affected by the presence of specific mineral types and microbial communities.

     Three different minerals (apatite, biotite and oligioclase) were inserted in the soil horizons (O (organic), E (eluvial), B (upper illuvial), and C (mineral)). After two years, soil samples were collected from both the bulk soil (next to the minerals) and from the soil attached to the mineral surfaces. The concentration of ten different fungal tri-hydroxamates and five bacterial ones were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS). In addition, total microbial composition and diversity were studied.

    Our field experiment succeeded in describing the relationship between the presence of siderophores, soil horizon and mineral type, in addition to understanding the interaction between mineral type and soil microbial composition. A wide range of fungal and bacterial hydroxamates were detected throughout the soil profile. On the other hand, the presence of the minerals completely altered the diversity of siderophores. In addition, each mineral had a unique interaction with hydroxamates in the different soil horizons. There were also a good relationship between the microbial diversity and the siderophore distribution. 

  • 3.
    Ahmed, Engy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Holmström, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    The Roles and Applications of Siderophores in Natural Environments2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Siderophores are organic compounds with low molecular mass that are produced by microorganisms growing under conditions of low iron. The primary function of these compounds is to chelate ferric iron from different terrestrial and aquatic habitats and thereby make it available for microbial cells.

    Siderophores have received much attention in recent years because of their potential roles and applications in various areas of environmental research. For instance, the production of siderophores can provide a quick identification of microbes to the species level that called “siderotyping”. On the other hand, siderophores could also function as biocontrol, biosensor, and bioremediation agents, in addition to their important role in mineral weathering and enhancing plant growth. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the composition of trihydroxamate siderophores in soil samples from different horizons (O (organic), E (eluvial), B (upper illuvial), and C (parent material)) of a podzol soil in Sweden, and study how they are affected by the presence of specific mineral types (apatite, biotite and oligioclase) that were inserted in the soil for two years in a field experiment.

    Our field experiment succeeded in describing the relationship between the presence of siderophores, soil horizons and mineral types. A wide range of fungal and bacterial hydroxamates were detected throughout the soil profile. On the other hand, the presence of the minerals completely altered the diversity of siderophores. In addition, each mineral had a unique interaction with hydroxamates in the different soil horizons. Our next step is to gain greater insight into the siderotyping to illustrate the relationship between the siderophore types that was found throughout the soil profile and on the different mineral surfaces and the microbial diversity by using metagenomic applications.

  • 4.
    Ahmed, Engy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Holmström, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Brüchert, Volker
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Holm, Nils G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    The Role of Microorganisms in the diversity and distribution of siderophores in Podzolic Forest Soil2013In: Mineralogical magazine, ISSN 0026-461X, E-ISSN 1471-8022, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 161--208(48)Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Iron is a key component of the chemical architecture of the biosphere. Due to the low bioavailability of iron in the environment, microorganisms have developed specific uptake strategies. The most important one is the production of siderophores, which are operationally defined as low-molecular-mass biogenic Fe (III)-binding compounds which may greatly increase bioavailability of Fe [1]. One of the primary biogeochemical functions of siderophores is therefore to increase Fe bioavailability by promoting the dissolution of iron-bearing minerals [2]. This study aims to understand the role of microorganisms in the chemical diversity and distribution of siderophores in podzol soil and how this diversity can contribute to the bioavailability of Fe in forest soil.Soil samples were collected from an experimental site in the area of Bispgården in central Sweden (63°07′N, 16°70′E) from the O (organic), E (eluvial), B1 (upper illuvial), and C (mineral) horizons. Concentration and chemical composition of dissolved and adsorbed siderophores in the soil samples were determined using colorimetric assays and high-performance liquid chromatography.The highest siderophore concentrations were found in the O layer and thereafter decreased by depth. Concentrations of dissolved hydroxamate, catecholate and carboxylate siderophores were up to 84, 17 and 0.2 nmol/ g soil, respectively. In contrast, concentrations of adsorbed hydroxamates, catecholates and carboxylates were only up to 1.8, 3 and 0.2 nmol/ g soil, respectively.Siderophore-producing microorganisms were isolated from the same soil samples. Viable fungi, bacteria and actinomycete counts ranged from 7 to 300, from 300 to 1800, and from 0 to 5 cfu/gm, respectively. The highest counts were found in the O and E layers. Only the E layer contained the three types of siderophore-producing microorganisms investigated in this study. Siderophores were extracted from culture filtrates of the isolated microorganisms when grown under iron-limited conditions. These extracts varied considerably in siderophore composition. Fungal isolates produced up to 183 μM of hydroxamates, especially those isolated from the O layer, whereas bacteria and actinomycete isolated from the O and E layers of the soil produced high amounts of carboxylate, catecholate and hydroxamate siderophores. Actinomycete produced up to 93 μM of hydroxamates and 47 μM of catecholates, while bacteria produced up to 34 μM of carboxylates and up to 14 μM of catecholates.The depth variability in concentration and chemical composition and the good correlation between abundance of siderophore-producing microorganisms and siderophore soil concentrations strongly suggest that these siderophore-producing microorganisms play an important role in the mobilization of iron in the podzol soil that may be important in iron availability to plants in forest environment.

    [1] Clay et al. (1981) Biochemistry 20, 2432-2436. [2] Duckworth et al. (2009) ChemGeol 260, 149-158.

  • 5.
    Ahmed, Engy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Holmström, Sara J. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Siderophore Production by Microorganisms Isolated From a Podzol Soil Profile2015In: Geomicrobiology Journal, ISSN 0149-0451, E-ISSN 1521-0529, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 397-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Siderophore-producing bacteria/actinobacteria and fungi were isolated from O- (organic), E- (eluvial), B- (upper illuvial), and C- (parent material) horizons of podzol soil. Siderophores were isolated and hydroxamate type siderophores were detected and quantitated by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The molecular identification of siderophore-producing isolates showed that there was a high diversity of fungal and bacterial/actinobacterial species throughout the soil profile. The isolated bacteria/actinobacteria showed different abilities in the production of ferrioxamines (E, B, G and D). Moreover, the isolated fungal species showed great variety in the production of ferrichromes, coprogens and fusarinines.

  • 6.
    Ahmed, Engy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Holmström, Sara J. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Siderophores in environmental research: roles and applications2014In: Microbial Biotechnology, ISSN 1751-7907, E-ISSN 1751-7915, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 196-208Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Siderophores are organic compounds with low molecular masses that are produced by microorganisms and plants growing under low iron conditions. The primary function of these compounds is to chelate the ferric iron [Fe(III)] from different terrestrial and aquatic habitats and thereby make it available for microbial and plant cells. Siderophores have received much attention in recent years because of their potential roles and applications in various areas of environmental research. Their significance in these applications is because siderophores have the ability to bind a variety of metals in addition to iron, and they have a wide range of chemical structures and specific properties. For instance, siderophores function as biocontrols, biosensors, and bioremediation and chelation agents, in addition to their important role in weathering soil minerals and enhancing plant growth. The aim of this literature review is to outline and discuss the important roles and functions of siderophores in different environmental habitats and emphasize the significant roles that these small organic molecules could play in applied environmental processes.

  • 7.
    Ahmed, Engy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Holmström, Sara J. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    The effect of soil horizon and mineral type on the distribution of siderophores in soil2014In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, ISSN 0016-7037, E-ISSN 1872-9533, Vol. 131, p. 184-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Iron is a key component of the chemical architecture of the biosphere. Due to the low bioavailability of iron in the environment, microorganisms have developed specific uptake strategies like production of siderophores. Siderophores are operationally defined as low-molecular-mass biogenic Fe(III)-binding compounds, that can increase the bioavailability of iron by promoting the dissolution of iron-bearing minerals. In the present study, we investigated the composition of dissolved and adsorbed siderophores of the hydroxamate family in the soil horizons of podzol and the effect of specific mineral types on siderophores. Three polished mineral specimens of 3 cm x 4 cm x 3 mm (apatite, biotite and oligioclase) were inserted in the soil horizons (O (organic), E (eluvial) and B (upper illuvial)). After two years, soil samples were collected from both the bulk soil of the whole profile and from the soil attached to the mineral surfaces. The concentration of ten different fungal tri-hydroxamates within ferrichromes, fusigen and coprogens families, and five bacterial hydroxamates within the ferrioxamine family were detected. All hydroxamate types were determined in both soil water (dissolved) and soil methanol (adsorbed) extracts along the whole soil profile by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS); hence, the study is the most extensive of its kind. We found that coprogens and fusigen were present in much higher concentrations in bulk soil than were ferrioxamines and ferrichromes. On the other hand, the presence of the polished mineral completely altered the distribution of siderophores. In addition, each mineral had a unique interaction with the dissolved and adsorbed hydroxamates in the different soil horizons. Thus siderophore composition in the soil environment is controlled by the chemical, physical and biological characteristics of each soil horizon and also by the available mineral types.

  • 8.
    Edberg, Frida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Andersson, Anders F.
    Kungliga tekniska högskolan.
    Holmström, Sara J. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Bacterial community composition in an artificial lake of a former open pit mine – effects of extreme chemistry and anoxic conditionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Edberg, Frida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Andersson, Anders F.
    Holmström, Sara J. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Bacterial community composition in the water column of a lake formed by a former uranium open pit mine2012In: Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0095-3628, E-ISSN 1432-184X, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 870-880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mining of pyrite minerals is a major environmental issue involving both biological and geochemical processes. Here we present a study of an artificial lake of a former uranium open pit mine with the aim to connect the chemistry and bacterial community composition (454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes) in the stratified water column. A shift in the water chemistry from oxic conditions in the epilimnion to anoxic, alkaline, and metal and sulfide-rich conditions in the hypolimnion was corresponded by a strong shift in the bacterial community, with few shared operational taxonomic units (OTU) between the water layers. The epilimnetic bacterial community of the lake (similar to 20 years old) showed similarities to other temperate freshwater lakes, while the hypolimnetic bacterial community showed similarity to extreme chemical environments. The epilimnetic bacterial community had dominance of Actinobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. The hypolimnion displayed a higher bacterial diversity and was dominated by the phototrophic green sulphur bacterium of the genus Chlorobium (ca. 40 % of the total community). Deltaproteobacteria were only represented in the hypolimnion and the most abundant OTUs were affiliated with ferric iron and sulfate reducers of the genus Geobacter and Desulfobulbus, respectively. The chemistry is clearly controlling, especially the hypolimnetic, bacterial community but the community composition also indicates that the bacteria are involved in metal cycling in the lake.

  • 10.
    Edberg, Frida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Hägglund, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Wällstedt, Teresia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Borg, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Holmström, Sara J. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Geochemistry of metals in a former uranium open pit mine – size fractionation of the water columnManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Edberg, Frida
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Kalinowski, Birgitta E..
    Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Mangament Co, Stockholm .
    Holmström, Sara J. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Holm, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Mobilization of metals from uranium mine waste: the role of pyoverdines produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens2010In: Geobiology, ISSN 1472-4677, E-ISSN 1472-4669, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 278-292Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microorganisms produce chelating agents, such as siderophores and other ligands, which allow them to mobilize and scavenge essential elements from the environment when bioavailability is low. To better understand the effects of biologically mediated leaching of metals from mine waste, Pseudomonas fluorescens was cultivated in the presence of processed ore from the former uranium mine in Ranstad, southern Sweden. Light conditions, the concentration of the mineral source and oxygen availability were varied. The presence of ore in the culture flasks enhanced bacterial growth and raised the pH of the culture medium. Increasing the amount of ore or enhancing aeration of the medium further encouraged cell growth and pH rise. Bacteria mobilized Fe, Ni and Co from the ore. Fe-siderophore complexes were detected and estimated to be present at approximately 9 μm. In the presence of bacteria and light, dissolved Fe and U concentrations were higher compared to dark conditions. Increasing the amount of ore resulted in higher dissolved Ni concentrations but lower dissolved Fe, most likely due to precipitate formation. Data from this study support siderophore production by bacteria that allowed mobilization of essential nutrients from the processed ore. However, the availability of potentially toxic metals like Ni and U may also be enhanced. Microbial-promoted mobilization could contribute to leaching of toxic metals in current and historic mining areas. This process should be considered during design and implementation of remediation projects where trace metals are of environmental concern.

  • 12. Ivarsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Broman, Curt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Holmström, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Ahlbom, Marianne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Lindblom, Sten
    Holm, Nils
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Geological Sciences.
    Putative fossilized fungi from the lithified volcaniclastic apron of Gran Canaria, Spain2011In: Astrobiology, ISSN 1531-1074, E-ISSN 1557-8070, Vol. 11, no 7, p. 633-650Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the discovery of fossilized filamentous structures in samples of the lithified, volcaniclastic apron of Gran Canaria, which were obtained during Leg 157 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP). These filamentous structures are 2–15 μm in diameter and several hundred micrometers in length and are composed of Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, Na, Ti, and C. Chitin was detected in the filamentous structures by staining with wheat germ agglutinin dye conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (WGA-FITC), which suggests that they are fossilized fungal hyphae. The further elucidation of typical filamentous fungal morphological features, such as septa, hyphal bridges, and anastomosis and their respective sizes, support this interpretation. Characteristic structures that we interpreted as fossilized spores were also observed in association with the putative hyphae. The fungal hyphae were found in pyroxene phenocrysts and in siderite pseudomorphs of a basalt breccia. The fungal colonization of the basalt clasts occurred after the brecciation but prior to the final emplacement and lithification of the sediment at 16–14 Ma. The siderite appears to have been partially dissolved by the presence of fungal hyphae, and the fungi preferentially colonized Fe-rich carbonates over Fe-poor carbonates (aragonite). Our findings indicate that fungi may be an important geobiological agent in subseafloor environments and an important component of the deep subseafloor biosphere, and that hydrothermal environments associated with volcanism can support a diverse ecosystem, including eukaryotes.

  • 13.
    Noziere, Barbara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Ekström, Sanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Alsberg, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Holmström, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology (INK).
    Radical-initiated formation of organosulfates and surfactants in atmospheric aerosols2010In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 37, no L05806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many atmospheric aerosols contain both organic compounds and inorganic material, such as sulfate salts. In this work, we show that these sulfates could trigger some chemical transformations of the organic compounds by producing sulfate radicals, SO4, when exposed to UV light (280–320 nm). In particular, we show by mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MSMS) that isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, and α-pinene in irradiated sulfate solutions (ammonium and sodium sulfate) produce the same organosulfates as previously identified in aerosols, and even some that had remained unidentified until now. With a typical time constant of 9 h instead of 4600 days for esterifications, these radical reactions would be a plausible origin for the atmospheric organosulfates. These reactions also produced efficient surfactants, possibly resembling the long-chain organosulfates found in the experiments. Thus, photochemistry in mixed sulfate/organic aerosols could increase cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) numbers, which would be supported by previous atmospheric observations

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