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  • 1. Besemer, Sytske
    et al.
    Axelsson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Intergenerational Transmission of Trajectories of Offending over Three Generations2016In: Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology, ISSN 2199-4641, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 417-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Crime runs in families: a convicted parent is a risk factor for children’s criminality. What is the extent of intergenerational transmission in Sweden? Is transmission similar for men and women and/or do we see gender-specific transmission? To what extent do children follow similar offending trajectories as their parents?

    Methods

    We used group-based trajectory modelling to study intergenerational transmission in the Stockholm Life Course Project. By merging the samples when running the trajectory models, we get a more robust model than if we had run the samples separately.

    Results

    Children of convicted parents are about 2–2.6 times more likely to have a conviction compared with children of non-convicted parents. We did not find strong support that intergenerational transmission is stronger for same-gender relationships. Transmission seems slightly stronger to daughters and from mothers, but few of these patterns are significant. Although father and offspring trajectories look similar, the significant relationship can be explained by the observation that non-offending fathers are more likely to have non-offending sons. Fathers with more chronic offending trajectories do not necessarily predict sons with similar more chronic offending trajectories.

    Conclusions

    We find strong intergenerational transmission of criminal behaviour, but offspring convictions are related to the fact that fathers have a conviction rather than to what their conviction trajectory looks like.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Christoffer
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    An Introduction to Life-Course Criminology2016Book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Hällsten, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Crime as a Price of Inequality?: The Gap in Registered Crime between Childhood Immigrants, Children of Immigrants and Children of Native Swedes2013In: British Journal of Criminology, ISSN 0007-0955, E-ISSN 1464-3529, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 456-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the gap in registered crime between the children of immigrants and the children of native Swedes. We follow all individuals who completed compulsory schooling during the period 1990-93 in the Stockholm Metropolitan area (N = 63,462) up to their thirties and analyse how family of origin and neighbourhood segregation during adolescence, subsequent to arriving in Sweden, influence the gap in recorded crimes. For males, we are able to explain between half and three-quarters of the gap in crime by reference to parental socio-economic resources and neighbourhood segregation. For females, we can explain even more, sometimes the entire gap. In addition, we tentatively examine the role of co-nationality or culture by comparing the crime rates of randomly chosen pairs of individuals originating from the same country. We find only a small correlation in the crime of individuals who share the same origin, indicating that culture is unlikely to be a strong cause of crime among immigrants.

  • 4. Killias, Martin
    et al.
    Redondo, Santioago
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    European Perspective2012In: Persisters and Desisters in Crime from Adolescence into Adulthood: Explanation, Prevention and Punishment / [ed] Rolf Loeber, Machteld Hoeve, N. Wim Slot, Peter H. van der Laan, Amsterdam: Ashgate, 2012Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents an overview of European research on the transition between juvenile offending and adult crime that is relevant for policymakers, researchers and practitioners. First, we shall review relevant European longitudinal studies. Next, we present some major cross-sectional studies that provide information about important across Europe and the United States. A section on special offenders includes information on homicide, domestic violence, gangs, and the nexus between migration and crime. The next section on the evaluation of interventions emphasizes their effectiveness regarding juvenile offenders. In the final section, we look at Europe’s highly heterogeneous policy responses to young offenders, including age limits of juvenile penal laws, sentencing (including the use of custody and other sanctions), and drug and alcohol policies.

  • 5.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Brottsligheten och samhället2010 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

     

    Påverkas brottligheten av var vi växer upp? Är brottsligt beteende inlärt? Hur påverkar samhällets reaktion på brott fortsatt kriminalitet? Vad egentligen är brott och vem har makt att definiera det? Hur påverkar sociala aktiviteter och relationer benegenheten att begå brott? Vad som gör att de flesta människor inte begår brott?

    Det är några av de frågor som berörs i Brottligheten och samhället, där fokus är att diskutera brottlighetens orsaker ur ett samhällsperspektiv. I boken får läsarna en introduktion till vad är, med vilka metoder vi kan mäta brottlighetens omfattning och karaktär, samt en bred överblick över de viktigaste kriminologiska teorierna om orsaker till brott och åtgärder mot brott.

  • 6.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Brottsutvecklingen2007In: Framtidens polis.: Delbetänkande av utredningen om den framtida polisutbildningen. SOU 2007:39, Stockholm: Fritze , 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Delinquent Networks: Youth Co-Offending2009In: Internationales Handbuch der Kriminologie. Band 2: Besondere Probleme der Kriminologie / [ed] Han Joachim Schnaider, Berlin: De Gruuyter Recht , 2009, 1, p. 995-1023Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Den ökande sociala kontrollen och brottsutvecklingen2012In: Kontrollens variationer / [ed] Lotta Pettersson, Tove Pettersson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2012, p. 312-349Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Forskarsamarbete utvecklar metoder för effektivitetsmätning2008In: PolistidningenArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    From treatment needs to risk assessment: a criminologist's reflections on forensic psychiatry in Scandinavia2014In: Current problems of the penal law and criminology / [ed] Emil W. Plywaczewski, C.H. Beck, 2014, p. 744-754Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Från vårdbehov till riskbedömningar2013In: Psykisk hälsa, ISSN 0033-3212, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 24-33Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Förord2012In: Mille Markovic: Biografin / [ed] Beata Hansson, Deanne Rauscher, Sala: Vertigo förlag , 2012, p. 5-12Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Hilarys Historia: samtal med Hilary Sarnecki 14 september 2007 - 12 augusti 20082013 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Introduktion till kriminologi. 1: Brottslighetens omfattning, karaktär och orsaker2014Book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology. Gävle Högskolan.
    Introduktion till kriminologi. 2: Straff och prevention2015Book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Management by results in police work: A few ideas drawn from Swedish and international research2012In: Current Problems of the Penal Law and Criminology / [ed] Emil W. Plywaczewski, Warszawa: Wolters Kluwer, 2012, p. 585-613Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Nätverk eller gäng? Medbrottslingskap hos ungdomar.2007In: Den svenska ungdomsbrottsligheten, 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Polisens prestationer: en ESO-rapport om resultatstyrning och effektivitet2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I rapporten diskuteras polisens mål och resultat, och sätter dem i relation till aktuell forskning om utvärdering och resultatstyrning av polisär verksamhet. Rapporten bygger på både nationella och internationella erfarenheter. Rapportens huvudsakliga slutsatts är är att styrning av svensk polis kännetecknas av en anmärkningsvärd brist på systematiska utvärderingar av verksamhetens effektivitet.

  • 19.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Should criminologists shift their focus away from juvenile delinquency?2014In: International journal of offender therapy and comparative criminology, ISSN 0306-624X, E-ISSN 1552-6933, Vol. 58, no 5, p. 519-521Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Stockholm prize in criminology2007In: Japanese journal of sociological criminology, ISSN 0386-460X, no 32, p. 5-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Stöld i Sverige2007In: Brott i välfärden: Om brottslighet, utsatthet och kriminalpolitik. Festskrift till Henrik Tham, Stockholm: Stockholms universitet, Kriminologiska institutionen , 2007, p. 462-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Våldet mot kvinnor är en del av ett större problem: -2008In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, Vol. 105, no 7, p. 457-461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Utsatthet för ,våld, i samhället är stort. Män dominerar som ,förövare, och ,offer,. Kvinnor misshandlas i huvudsak inomhus. Förövaren är ofta maken eller pojkvännen etc. Fattiga och ,socialt utsatta, återfinns ofta bland både offer och förövare. ,Våld mot kvinnor, är en del av ett större våldsproblematik.

  • 23.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Våldet mot kvinnor är en del av ett större våld2008In: Läkartidningen, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Zarzadzanie przez wyniki w policji: Kilka pogladow na podstawie badan szwedzkich i miedzynarodowych2011In: Przeglad Policyjny, ISSN 0867-5708, Vol. 1, no 101, p. 30-59Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Beckly, Amber
    Kardell, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Immigration and crime in Sweden2014In: The Routledge Handbook on Crime and International Migration / [ed] Sharon Pickering and Julie Ham, London: Routledge, 2014, p. 41-54Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Killias, Martin
    Rendondo, Santiago
    European Perspective2012In: From Juvenile Delinquency to Adult Crime: Criminal Careers, Justice Policy, and Prevention / [ed] Rolf Loeber, David Farrington, Oxford:: Oxford University Press, 2012, 1, p. 278-314Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Sivertsson, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Att bryta en kriminell livsstil: Livshistorier från "The Stockholm Life-Course Project"2013Report (Other academic)
  • 28. Sturup, Joakim
    et al.
    Rostami, Amir
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden; Gävle University, Sweden.
    Mondani, Hernan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden.
    Gerell, Manne
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology. Gävle University, Sweden; Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Edling, Christofer
    Increased Gun Violence Among Young Males in Sweden: a Descriptive National Survey and International Comparison2018In: European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research, ISSN 0928-1371, E-ISSN 1572-9869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This population-based time-trend study examines gun violence rates among males in Sweden during the years 1996 to 2015 and compares the rate in Sweden to other Western European countries. Data were collected from six registries and are presented descriptively per 100,000 inhabitants. The risks among males in Sweden increased considerably in both lethal and non-lethal gun victimization and perpetration. Among males aged 15 to 29 there was a five-fold increase in risk for victimization in lethal and non-lethal gun violence during the 20-year observation period. In a comparative perspective the rate of gun homicide victimization among males 15 to 29 years was higher in Sweden compared to other Western European countries, while the risk for males over age 30 was at an average level. Based on the results of this study we conclude that gun violence among young males in Sweden has been on the rise and is at a high level compared to other Western European countries. The development of gun violence in Sweden can be characterized as endemic, prevalent in both population and socially vulnerable areas.

  • 29. Tumminello, Michele
    et al.
    Edling, Christofer
    Liljeros, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden.
    Mantegna, Rosario N.
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    The Phenomenology of Specialization of Criminal Suspects2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 5, article id e64703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A criminal career can be either general, with the criminal committing different types of crimes, or specialized, with the criminal committing a specific type of crime. A central problem in the study of crime specialization is to determine, from the perspective of the criminal, which crimes should be considered similar and which crimes should be considered distinct. We study a large set of Swedish suspects to empirically investigate generalist and specialist behavior in crime. We show that there is a large group of suspects who can be described as generalists. At the same time, we observe a non-trivial pattern of specialization across age and gender of suspects. Women are less prone to commit crimes of certain types, and, for instance, are more prone to specialize in crimes related to fraud. We also find evidence of temporal specialization of suspects. Older persons are more specialized than younger ones, and some crime types are preferentially committed by suspects of different ages.

  • 30. Tuvblad, Catherine
    et al.
    Narusyte, Jurgita
    Grann, Martin
    Sarnecki, Jerzy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Criminology.
    Lichtenstein, Paul
    The Genetic and Environmental Etiology of Antisocial Behavior from Childhood to Emerging Adulthood2011In: Behavior Genetics, ISSN 0001-8244, E-ISSN 1573-3297, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 629-640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research suggests that both genetic and environmental influences are important for antisocial behavior across the life span, even though the prevalence and incidence of antisocial behavior varies considerably across ages. However, little is known of how genetic and environmental effects influence the development of antisocial behavior. A total of 2,600 male and female twins from the population-based Swedish Twin Registry were included in the present study. Antisocial behavior was measured on four occasions, when twins were 8-9, 13-14, 16-17, and 19-20 years old. Longitudinal analyses of the data were conducted using structural equation modeling. The stability of antisocial behavior over time was explained by a common latent persistent antisocial behavior factor. A common genetic influence accounted for 67% of the total variance in this latent factor, the shared environment explained 26%, and the remaining 7% was due to the non-shared environment. Significant age-specific shared environmental factors were found at ages 13-14 years, suggesting that common experiences (e.g., peers) are important for antisocial behavior at this age. Results from this study show that genetic as well as shared environmental influences are important in antisocial behavior that persists from childhood to emerging adulthood.

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