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  • 1.
    Alvarez López, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Seiler Brylla, CharlottaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.Shaw, PhilipStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Computer mediated discourse across languages2013Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Alvarez López, Laura
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies.
    Seiler Brylla, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Baltic Languages, Finnish and German.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Introduction2013In: Computer mediated discourse across languages / [ed] Laura Alvarez López, Charlotta Seiler Brylla & Philip Shaw, Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2013, 1, p. 11-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3. Caudery, Tim
    et al.
    Petersen, Margrethe
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Language Environments of Exchange Students at Scandinavian Universities2007In: Researching Content and Language Integration in Higher Education: Selected peer-reviewed papers from the ICLHE 2006 Conference, University of Maastricht, Maastricht , 2007, p. 233-250Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4. Caudery, Tim
    et al.
    Petersen, Margrethe
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The motivations of exchange students at Scandinavian universities.2008In: Students, Staff and Academic Mobility in Higher Education ., Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Press, , 2008, p. 114-130.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5. Gillaerts, Paul
    et al.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Introduction.2006In: The Map and the Landscape: Norm and reality in genre studies, Bern:Peter Lang , 2006, p. 1-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6. Gillaerts, Paul
    et al.
    Shaw, PhilipStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The map and the landscape: Norms and practices in genre2006Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 7. Hyland, Ken
    et al.
    Shaw, PhilipStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    The Routledge Handbook of English for Academic Purposes2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 8. Malmström, Hans
    et al.
    Mezek, Spela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Irvine, Aileen
    Engaging with Terminology in the Multilingual Classroom: Teachers’ Practices for Bridging theGap Between L1 Lectures and English Reading2017In: Classroom Discourse, ISSN 1946-3014, E-ISSN 1946-3022, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 3-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In some academic settings where English is not the first language it is nonetheless common for reading to be assigned in English, and the expectation is often that students will acquire subject terminology incidentally in the first language as well as in English as a result of listening and reading. It is then a prerequisite that students notice and engage with terminology in both languages. To this end, teachers’ classroom practices for making students attend to and engage with terms are crucial for furthering students’ vocabulary competence in two languages. Using transcribed video recordings of eight undergraduate lectures from two universities in such a setting, this paper provides a comprehensive picture of what teachers ‘do’ with terminology during a lecture, i.e. how terms are allowed to feature in the classroom discourse. It is established, for example, that teachers nearly always employ some sort of emphatic practice when using a term in a lecture. However, the repertoire of such practices is limited. Further, teachers rarely adapt their repertoires to cater to the special needs arguably required in these settings, or to exploit the affordances of multilingual environments.

  • 9.
    Mc Million, Alan
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Reading proficiency in advanced L2 users2016In: Advanced proficiency and exceptional ability in second languages / [ed] Kenneth Hyltenstam, Boston/Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2016, p. 159-170Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    McMillion, Alan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
     Compensation and compensatory processes in advanced L2 readers2009In: Crossing languages and research methods: analyses of adult foreign language reading, Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing , 2009, p. 123-146Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    McMillion, Alan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Shaw, Philip
    Reading comprehension in advanced L2 users of English2008In: Linguistic Diversity and Sustainable Development, ASLA , 2008, p. 209-224Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Melchers, Gunnel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    World Englishes: an Introduction2003Book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Mezek, Spela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Linnæus University.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Irvine, Aileen
    Edinburgh University.
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Learning subject-specific L2 terminology in a parallel-language HE course: The effect of medium and order of exposureArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Mezek, Spela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Pecorari, Diane
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Irvine, Aileen
    Malmström, Hans
    Learning subject-specific L2 terminology: The effect of medium and order of exposure2015In: English for specific purposes (New York, N.Y.), ISSN 0889-4906, E-ISSN 1873-1937, Vol. 38, p. 57-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the globalised university environment, many university students are expected to learn subject-specific terminology in both the local language and the L2 (English) by learning from two media in two different languages: lectures in the local language and reading in L2 English. These students' bilingual learning is greatly affected by the learning strategies they employ. An experiment was designed to investigate the effects of student choice of learning media and the order of media on their learning and perception of learning of terminology in English. The results confirm that added exposure to terminology in different media, even in different languages, contributes to learning and show that, in some circumstances, learning terminology from reading may be more effective than learning it from a lecture. The results also show that students do not correctly judge their knowledge of terms learnt from different media in different languages and that they underestimate knowledge gained from reading in L2. Implications for teaching are discussed.

  • 15. Okamura, Akiko
    et al.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Development of Academic Journal Abstracts in Relation to the Demands of Stakeholders2014In: Abstracts in academic discourse: variation and change / [ed] Marina Bondi, Rosa Lorés Sanz, Bern: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2014, p. 287-318Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16. Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Types of student intertextuality and faculty attitudes2012In: Journal of second language writing, ISSN 1060-3743, E-ISSN 1873-1422, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 149-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intertextuality is a prominent feature of academic writing, and the ability to use sources effectively and appropriately is an essential skill which novice writers must acquire. It is also a complex skill, and student performance is not always successful. It is presumably beneficial for students to receive consistent messages about what source use is and is not appropriate, but some evidence suggests that university teachers and other gatekeepers may fall short of this consistency. This paper reports the findings of semi-structured text-based interviews aimed at understanding the basis of teacher attitudes and responses to intertextuality in academic writing. Teachers who were asked to evaluate the same examples from student texts differed in their judgments about whether the examples were appropriate, and provided different types of explanation for their judgments. These explanations enable us to develop a four-part typology of intertextuality which allows analytic discussion of differing judgments. The implications both of the teacher judgments and of the typology for second language writing instruction are discussed and an assessment of the relevance of our findings for the theme of this special issue is provided.

  • 17.
    Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola .
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Irvine, Aileen
    University of Edinburgh .
    Malmström, Hans
    Chalmers .
    English for Academic Purposes at Swedish universities: Teachers’ objectives and practices2011In: Ibérica, ISSN 1139-7241, E-ISSN 2340-2784, no 22, p. 55-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a parallel-language environment the use of textbooks in English in courses otherwise in the local language is naturalized and not widely discussed or questioned. The aim of this study was to elicit the attitudes and syllabus infrastructure that underlie the practice. A large-scale survey was carried out and answers were obtained from over 20% of teachers at Swedish universities. Results confirmed that a majority regarded English as important during and/or after university studies and showed that they considered the use of Englishlanguage textbooks as providing a useful opportunity for incidental language learning. In strong contrast to the situation in a content and language integrated learning environment, only a small minority of courses were reported to have any specified learning outcome related to English. Open answers showed awareness of the benefits and risks of parallel-language practices, but no interest in making aims explicit. In our view, there is no contradiction between incidental learning and explicit aims, and course aims which remain implicit make rational planning and constructive alignment more difficult. They also inhibit discussion of appropriate methodology.

  • 18. Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Irvine, Aileen
    Malmström, Hans
    Mezek, Spela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Reading in tertiary education: Undergraduate student practices and attitudes2012In: Quality in Higher Education, ISSN 1353-8322, E-ISSN 1470-1081, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 235-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the findings of a study of undergraduate student use of, and attitudes toward, textbooks and other assigned reading. More than 1200 students of various subjects at three Swedish universities were surveyed. Most students said reading played an important role in learning generally and attributed positive characteristics to their textbooks. However, students’ self-reported reading behaviour was at odds with these attitudes, with many students reporting some degree of non-compliance with reading assignments and a small group of students expressing active resistance to completing reading assignments. Although textbooks were perceived as valuable, students reported a preference for learning course content from other resources, such as lectures and lecture notes. Textbooks were perceived as alternatives, rather than complements, to attending class. Differences were found across academic disciplines. Implications of these findings for educational administration and classroom practice are discussed.

  • 19. Pecorari, Diane
    et al.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Malmström, Hans
    Irvine, Aileen
    English Textbooks in Parallel-Language Tertiary Education2011In: TESOL quarterly (Print), ISSN 0039-8322, E-ISSN 1545-7249, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 313-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tertiary education in many countries is increasingly bilingual, with English used in parallel with the national language, particularly as a reading language. This article describes the results of a survey of student attitudes toward, and reading practices regarding, English language textbooks. Over 1,000 students at three Swedish universities responded to a questionnaire asking about their experiences with English textbooks. Textbooks written in English were generally unpopular, and the perception was widespread that they placed a greater burden on students. However, respondents were divided about whether their reading behavior and their learning outcomes were affected by having a textbook in English, and about whether English texts were desirable. The findings of this study have implications for teaching practices in contexts in which students are asked to read, or are being prepared to read, in a second language. Implications for the English as a foreign language or English as a second language classroom are discussed.

  • 20. Richard, Nordberg
    et al.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Norms and power in learner genres and workplace genres2006In: The Map and the Landscape: norms and practices in genre, Bern: Peter Lang. , 2006, p. 219-235Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Acquiring prescriptive business pragmatics2005In: Business Discourse: Texts and Context, Peter Lang, Bern , 2005, p. 185-224Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Adjusting practices to aims in integrated language learning and disciplinary learning2013In: Recherche et Pratiques Pédagogiques en Langues de Spécialité: Cahiers de l'APLIUT, ISSN 2257-5405, E-ISSN 2119-5242, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 15-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is important to define the purpose of not teaching a university course in the local L1. We must distinguish between teaching content in a second language because L1 is impractical for some reason, and teaching content and a second language simultaneously with L2 improvement as a course aim. The former demands lingua-franca practices aimed at maximally efficient communication (rather than maximally correct or elaborated  language). The latter demands practices more allied to language teaching aimed at developing the particular skills that have been identified as expected learning outcomes. Appropriate practices are suggested.

  • 23.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Conclusion2014In: Dialogicity in Written Specialised Genres / [ed] Luz Gil-Salom, Carmen Soler-Monreal, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2014, p. 209-220Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Contrastive rhetoric in context: Danish economists writing in two languages2002In: Porta Scientiae I-II. Lingua specialis.: Proceedings from the 13th European Symposium on LSP. (Proceedings of the University of Vaasa. Reports 95.), 2002, p. 668-680Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Danish translators in a global market2000In: ATA Chronicle, Vol. XXIX, no 6, p. 41-(viii)Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Engelska som lingua franca och som internationellt vetenskapsspråk2008In: Vetenskapsengelska - med svensk kvalitet?, 2008, p. 21-34Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Evaluative language in evaluative and promotional genres.2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Forms of argument in literary criticism at two levels2001In: Languages for Special Purposes: Perspectives for the New Millennium, 2001Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Genre Analysis2016In: The Routledge Handbook of English for Academic Purposes / [ed] Ken Hyland, Philip Shaw, Routledge, 2016, p. 243-255Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Grammar in Academic Writing2013In: The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics / [ed] Carol A. Chapelle, Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    How do we recognise implicit evaluation in academic book reviews?2004In: Academic Discourse: Linguistic Insights into Evaluation, Peter Lang, Bern , 2004, p. 121-140Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Intertextuality, intergenericity, and interdiscursivity in the management summaries and client responsibilities sections of software design proposals2014In: ESP Today, E-ISSN 2334-9050, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 134-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Workplaces are characterised by a particular assemblage of genres and particular composing practices. These are usually very local, in the sense that they are different in different workplaces, and also very different from the genres and practices to be found in academia. In this article an account is given of text analysis and interviews which focus on the interrrelations of genres and discourses in the writing practices in a software company in England. The emphasis is on the function and re-use of formulaic text, using the example of two parts of the software design proposal: the Management Summary and Client Responsibilities. The aim is to examine how the composing practices in the company compare with those familiar from academic writing. The design proposals are shown to be texts characterised by multiple authorship, discourse which varies across sections, and above all by strategic re-use of text. Since none of these are characteristics of academic writing, ESP teaching has to ensure that it does not impose misleading requirements on students, and pedagogic applications are suggested.

  • 33.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Introductory Remarks2007In: Language and Discipline Perspectives, Newcastle, Cambridge Scholars Publishing , 2007, p. 2-13Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Linking adverbials in student and professional writing in literary studies: what makes writing mature2009In: Academic writing: at the interface of corpus and discourse / [ed] Maggie Charles, Diane Pecorari and Susan Hunston, London: Continuum , 2009, p. 215-235Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mauranen, Anna: Exploring ELF: Academic English shaped by non-native speakers, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2012; ISBN: 978-0521-17752-82013In: Journal of English as a Lingua Franca, ISSN 2191-9216, E-ISSN 2191-933X, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 397-400Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book could be seen as an early representative of a mature phase of ELF studies,in which the validity of ELF usage is well enough established for the focus tobe on dispassionate investigation rather than advocacy. It is based on the millionwordHelsinki ELFA corpus of academic speech in English produced (mainly) byspeakers with a different home language. The author’s wide reading, clear vision,and rational approach make it an exceptionally valuable book, not only withinELF studies but in terms of a number of general issues raised. Mauranen sets thediscussion of SLU (second language use) in the context of established studiesof translation studies, second language acquisition, spoken language, languagechange, and language processing and presents empirical findings with implicationsfor all these areas and for language teaching.

  • 36.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Performing Scottishness and being Scottish : spelling and identity in Scottish internet discourse2013In: Computer mediated discourse across languages / [ed] Laura Alvarez Lopez, Charlotta Seiler Brylla, Philip Shaw, Stockholm: Acta Universitatis Stockholmiensis, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Purpose and other paradigmatic similarities as criteria for genre analysis: The case of 4192005In: Genre Variation in Business Letters, Peter Lang, Bern , 2005, p. 257-280Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Research reports in industrial and acacdemic research2010In: English for Professional and Academic Purposes  / [ed] Miguel F. Ruiz-Garrido, Juan Carlos Palmer-Silveira, Inmaculada Fortanet-Gómez, Amsterdam: Rodopi , 2010, p. 73-87Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Many doctoral students at Swedish technical universities are so-called industridoktorander who are seconded by their companies to study for an advanced degree while employed by the company, and typically while working on research topics which arise naturally out of their industrial work. They therefore have  experience of the genres and writing processes associated with in-company research and development as well as those of academic research. This paper reports on interviews based on text samples in which such doctoral students describe their writing, its production conditions, and its audiences (and hence language choice). The aim is examine their perceptions of the differences between the two writing environments and the discourses which researchers use to discuss them. Broadly it is concluded that the subjects perceive themselves as belonging simultaneously to two discourse communities with rather different values. University research reports are themselves exposed to competition for publication space and need to stand on their own, while the internal reports are embedded in a network of telephone and email communication and are written more for the record. Therefore the academic reports need to be tightly focused, carefully written in the ‘empiricist repertoire’, and explicitly meet the expectations of an international audience, while the company test reports are merely raw material for use in inter-company competition, and therefore must be inclusive, to some extent truthful in a ‘contingent repertoire’ and implicitly refer to the shared company environment. However in-company attitudes to the written product vary according to the discipline; archival material can be very valuable in some areas and useless in other, fast changing, fields.

  • 39.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Review of Chris McCully  The Sound Structure of English: An Introduction (Cambridge Introductions to the English Language) Cambridge: CUP.2009In: English Today, ISSN 0266-0784, E-ISSN 1474-0567, Vol. 100, no 4, p. 94-95Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Review of Diane Belcher, Ann Johns Brian Partridge New Directions in English for Specific Purposes Research, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press 2012In: TESOL quarterly (Print), ISSN 0039-8322, E-ISSN 1545-7249, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 875-877Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Review of Intercultural Aspects Of Specialized Communication, edited by Chris Candlin and Maurizio Gotti2006In: English for Specific Purposes, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 379-383Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 42.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Review of Peter Trudgill (2004) 'New-Dialect Formation: The Inevitability of Colonial Englishes'2004In: Linguist List, Vol. 15, no 3423Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Review of R.R. Jordan (1997) 'English for Academic Purposes'2001In: English for Specific Purposes, p. 197-200Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Rhetorical development in Swedish university students' written English: A longitudinal study2004In: Second Language Acquisition: Stockholm Studies in Modern Philology, Almqvist & Wiksell International, Stockholm , 2004, p. 143-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Rhetorical prescriptions and types of cultural difference2004In: Language, Culture, Rhetoric: Cultural and Rhetorical Perspectives on Communication, 2004, p. 267-279Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Sentence openings in English and Danish academic prose.2004In: Nordic Journal of English Studies, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 67-84.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Special issue on academic language2002Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Spelling, accent and identity in computer-mediated communication .2008In: English Today, ISSN 0266-0784, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 42-49Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The development of attitudes to foreign languages as shown in the English novel2015In: From Clerks to Corpora: essays on the English language yesterday and today: essays in honour of Nils-Lennart Johannesson / [ed] Philip Shaw, Britt Erman, Gunnel Melchers, Peter Sundkvist, Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2015, p. 193-214Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Shaw, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The development of Swedish university students' written English, appropriacy, scope, and coherence2004In: Proceedings of the NAES Conference May 2004, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
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