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  • 1. El-Aarag, Bishoy
    et al.
    Khairy, Asmaa
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Protective Effects of Flavone from Tamarix aphylla against CCl4-Induced Liver Injury in Mice Mediated by Suppression of Oxidative Stress, Apoptosis and Angiogenesis2019In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 20, no 20, article id 5215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study aimed to investigate, for the first time, the beneficial effects of 3,5-dihydroxy-4',7-dimethoxyflavone isolated from Tamarix aphylla L. against liver injury in mice. Liver injury was induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) at a dose of 0.4 mL/kg mixed in olive oil at ratio (1:4) twice a week for 6 consecutive weeks. The administration of CCl4 caused significant histopathological changes in liver tissues while the pre-treatment with the flavone at dose of 10 and 25 mg/kg ameliorated the observed liver damages. Also, it markedly reduced hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) level as well as increased the activities of liver superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) compared with their recorded levels in CCl4 model group. Moreover, the immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the enhancement in the protein level of B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) while the protein levels of cysteine-aspartic acid protease-3 (caspase-3), Bcl-2-associated x protein (Bax), transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and CD31 were suppressed following the flavone treatement. These results suggest that the flavone can inhibit liver injury induced in mice owning to its impact on the oxidation, apoptotic and angiogenesis mechanisms. Further pharmacological investigations are essential to determine the effectiveness of the flavone in human.

  • 2. El-Aarag, Bishoy
    et al.
    Magdy, Mohamed
    AlAjmi, Mohamed F.
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Melittin Exerts Beneficial Effects on Paraquat-Induced Lung Injuries in Mice by Modifying Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis2019In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 24, no 8, article id 1498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Melittin (MEL) is a 26-amino acid peptide with numerous biological activities. Paraquat (PQ) is one of the most widely used herbicides, although it is extremely toxic to humans. To date, PQ poisoning has no effective treatment, and therefore the current study aimed to assess for the first time the possible effects of MEL on PQ-induced lung injuries in mice. Mice received a single intraperitoneal (IP) injection of PQ (30 mg/kg), followed by IP treatment with MEL (0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg) twice per week for four consecutive weeks. Histological alterations, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in the lungs were studied. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining indicated that MEL markedly reduced lung injuries induced by PQ. Furthermore, treatment with MEL increased superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, and decreased malonaldehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) levels in lung tissue homogenates. Moreover, immunohistochemical staining showed that B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) and survivin expressions were upregulated after MEL treatment, while Ki-67 expression was downregulated. The high dose of MEL was more effective than the low dose in all experiments. In summary, MEL efficiently reduced PQ-induced lung injuries in mice. Specific pharmacological examinations are required to determine the effectiveness of MEL in cases of human PQ poisoning.

  • 3. El-Kemary, Maged
    et al.
    Ibrahim, Eslam
    A-Ajmi, Mohammad F.
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Alanazi, A. D.
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Calendula officinalis-mediated biosynthesis of Silver Nanoparticles and their Electrochemical and Optical Characterization2016In: International Journal of Electrochemical Science, ISSN 1452-3981, E-ISSN 1452-3981, Vol. 11, no 12, p. 10795-10805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The metal nanoparticles synthesis is highly explored field of nanotechnology. The biological methods seem to be more effective. A simple and elegant method is adopted to prepare Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in a single step using Calendula officinalis extract (COE) as reducing and stabilizing agent. The plant extract is mixed with AgNO3 to get biosynthesized AgNPs. The biosynthesized AgNPs were both optically and electrochemically characterized by UV-Vis, Infrared spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Fluorescence spectroscopy, Zeta potential and Cyclic Voltammetry. The results showed Calendula officinalis extract is a useful bioreductant for the synthesis of AgNPs. This study infers that the size of biosynthesized AgNPs ranges from 30 to 50 nm. The surface plasmon resonance peak in the UV-Vis absorption spectra shows maximum absorption at 435 nm. Fluorescence spectra of silver nanoparticles, which show an emission peak at 468 nm have also been studied. Zeta potential analysis ensured the biosynthesized AgNPs are highly stable. Using this environmentally friendly method of biological AgNPs production supplies rates of biosynthesis facile in comparison with other chemical and engineered routes. The employment of traditional medicine in biosynthesis protocols can potentially open new doors in various human health and well-being implications such as cosmetics, foods and medicine.

  • 4. El-Kemary, Maged
    et al.
    Zahran, Moustafa
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Spectral characterisation of the silver nanoparticles biosynthesised using Ambrosia maritima plant2016In: Micro & Nano Letters, ISSN 1750-0443, E-ISSN 1750-0443, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 311-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were biosynthesised by reducing silver nitrate (AgNO3) using Ambrosia maritima aqueous leaves extract. The biosynthesised AgNPs were characterised by transmission electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and zeta potential analyser. The nanoparticles were generally found to be spherical in shape with average size of 30 nm and were stable at zeta potential of -26.29 mV. The data collected by cyclic voltammetry, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer and spectrofluorophotometer proved the characteristic electrochemical and optical properties of the biosynthesised AgNPs. The metallic nanoparticles showed an anodic peak at 0.4 mV, a surface plasmon resonance peak at 437 nm and a fluorescence emission peak at the wavelength of 467 nm. In conclusion, AgNPs biosynthesised using A. maritima proved to be compatible and feasible to be studied further in in vitro and in vivo systems. Overall, the biosynthesised AgNPs can be used as a tool applied in a broad range of industrial and medical applications.

  • 5. El-Saied, Fathy
    et al.
    El-Aarag, Bishoy
    Salem, Tarek
    Said, Ghada
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Novum, Sweden.
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Synthesis, Characterization, and In Vivo Anti-Cancer Activity of New Metal Complexes Derived from Isatin-N(4)antipyrinethiosemicarbazone Ligand Against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma Cells2019In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 24, no 18, article id 3313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study aimed to synthesize new metal coordination complexes with potential biomedical applications. Metal complexes were prepared via the reaction of isatin-N(4)anti- pyrinethiosemicarbazone ligand 1 with Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Zn(II), and Fe(III) ions. The obtained metal complexes 2-12 were characterized using elemental, spectral (H-1-NMR, EPR, Mass, IR, UV-Vis) and thermal (TGA) techniques, as well as magnetic moment and molar conductance measurements. In addition, their geometries were studied using EPR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. To evaluate the in vivo anti-cancer activities of these complexes, the ligand 1 and its metal complexes 2, 7 and 9 were tested against solid tumors. The solid tumors were induced by subcutaneous (SC) injection of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells in mice. The impact of the selected complexes on the reduction of tumor volume was determined. Also, the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cysteine aspartyl-specific protease-7 (caspase-7) in tumor and liver tissues of mice bearing EAC tumor were determined. Moreover, their effects on alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), albumin, and glucose levels were measured. The results revealed that the tested compounds, especially complex 9, reduced tumor volume, inhibited the expression of VEGF, and induced the expression of caspase-7. Additionally, they restored the levels of ALT, AST, albumin, and glucose close to their normal levels. Taken together, our newly synthesized metal complexes are promising anti-cancer agents against solid tumors induced by EAC cells as supported by the inhibition of VEGF and induction of caspase-7.

  • 6. El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    et al.
    Azeem, Muhammad
    Khalil, Nasr S.
    Sakr, Hanem H.
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Awang, Khalijah
    Saeed, Aamer
    Farag, Mohamed A.
    AlAjmi, Mohamed F.
    Pålsson, Katinka
    Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin
    Essential oils of aromatic Egyptian plants repel nymphs of the tick Ixodes ricinus (Acari: Ixodidae)2017In: Experimental & applied acarology, ISSN 0168-8162, E-ISSN 1572-9702, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 139-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the role of Ixodes ricinus (L.) (Acari: Ixodidae) in the transmission of many serious pathogens, personal protection against bites of this tick is essential. In the present study the essential oils from 11 aromatic Egyptian plants were isolated and their repellent activity against I. ricinus nymphs was evaluated Three oils (i.e. Conyza dioscoridis L., Artemisia herba-alba Asso and Calendula officinalis L.) elicited high repellent activity in vitro of 94, 84.2 and 82%, respectively. The most active essential oil (C. dioscoridis) was applied in the field at a concentration of 6.5 A mu g/cm(2) and elicited a significant repellent activity against I. ricinus nymphs by 61.1%. The most repellent plants C. dioscoridis, C. officinalis and A. herba-alba yielded essential oils by 0.17, 0.11 and 0.14%, respectively. These oils were further investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. alpha-Cadinol (10.7%) and hexadecanoic acid (10.5%) were the major components of C. dioscoridis whereas in C. officinalis, alpha-cadinol (21.2%) and carvone (18.2%) were major components. Artemisia herba-alba contained piperitone (26.5%), ethyl cinnamate (9.5%), camphor (7.7%) and hexadecanoic acid (6.9%). Essential oils of these three plants have a potential to be used for personal protection against tick bites.

  • 7. El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    et al.
    El-Shabasy, Rehan M.
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Saeed, Aamer
    Shah, Afzal
    Shah, Raza
    Iftikhar, Faiza Jan
    Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M.
    Omri, Abdelfatteh
    Hajrahand, Nahid H.
    Sabir, Jamal S. M.
    Zou, Xiaobo
    Halabi, Mohammed F.
    Sarhan, Wessam
    Guo, Weisheng
    Metal nanoparticles fabricated by green chemistry using natural extracts: biosynthesis, mechanisms, and applications2019In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 9, no 42, p. 24539-24559Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are new inspiring clinical targets that have emerged from persistent efforts with unique properties and diverse applications. However, the main methods currently utilized in their production are not environmentally friendly. With the aim of promoting a green approach for the synthesis of NPs, this review describes eco-friendly methods for the preparation of biogenic NPs and the known mechanisms for their biosynthesis. Natural plant extracts contain many different secondary metabolites and biomolecules, including flavonoids, alkaloids, terpenoids, phenolic compounds and enzymes. Secondary metabolites can enable the reduction of metal ions to NPs in eco-friendly one-step synthetic processes. Moreover, the green synthesis of NPs using plant extracts often obviates the need for stabilizing and capping agents and yields biologically active shape- and size-dependent products. Herein, we review the formation of metallic NPs induced by natural extracts and list the plant extracts used in the synthesis of NPs. In addition, the use of bacterial and fungal extracts in the synthesis of NPs is highlighted, and the parameters that influence the rate of particle production, size, and morphology are discussed. Finally, the importance and uniqueness of NP-based products are illustrated, and their commercial applications in various fields are briefly featured.

  • 8. El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    et al.
    Gomaa, Mohamed
    Salem, Mousa Maali
    Benchoula, Khaled
    Keshk, Hager M.
    Yosri, Nermeen
    Ayesh, Ahmed
    Asker, Ahmed M.
    Soliman, Kawther
    Hamza, Zeinab
    Mansour, Hager M.
    Elkhateeb, Ahmed
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    CYTOTOXIC EFFECTS OF THE RED SEA SOFT CORAL SARCOPHYTON TROCHELIOPHORUM2016In: Acta Poloniae Pharmaceutica, ISSN 0001-6837, Vol. 73, no 6, p. 1587-1592Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study describes the in vitro cytotoxic effects of soft coral (Sarcophyton trocheliophorum). Soft corals of genus Sarcophyton were reported to contain compounds that arc active against brine shrimp and promote paclitaxel cytotoxicity in the human colon cancer Caco-2 cell line. The a-hexane extract of the soft coral Sarcophyton trocheliophorum induced significant dose-dependent toxicity (LC50 96.7 ppm) compared with ethyl acetate (LC50 120 ppm). We reported the most active cytotoxic level to be correspondence to LC50 values of 20.2, 59.2 ppm and 18.9 and 26 ppm. Accordingly, bio-assay guided fractionation was conducted to identify the bioactive compounds. Arachidonic acid. eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid were characterized based on GC-MS analyses. Our results demonstrate the value of marine products as a natural source of medicinally interesting cytotoxic compounds.

  • 9. El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    et al.
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Taher, Eman A.
    Farag, Mohamed A.
    Saeed, Aamer
    Gamal, Mohamed
    Hegazy, Mohamed-Elamir F.
    Youssef, Diaa
    Musharraf, Syed G.
    Alajlani, Muaaz M.
    Xiao, Jianbo
    Efferth, Thomas
    Cardenolides: Insights from chemical structure and pharmacological utility2019In: Pharmacological Research, ISSN 1043-6618, E-ISSN 1096-1186, Vol. 141, p. 123-175Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiac glycosides (CGs) are a class of naturally occurring steroid-like compounds, and members of this class have been in clinical use for more than 1500 years. They have been used in folk medicine as arrow poisons, abortifacients, heart tonics, emetics, and diuretics as well as in other applications. The major use of CGs today is based on their ability to inhibit the membrane-bound Na+/K+ -ATPase enzyme, and they are regarded as an effective treatment for congestive heart failure (CHF), cardiac arrhythmia and atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, increasing evidence has indicated the potential cytotoxic effects of CGs against various types of cancer. In this review, we highlight some of the structural features of this class of natural products that are crucial for their efficacy, some methods of isolating these compounds from natural resources, and the structural elucidation tools that have been used. We also describe their physicochemical properties and several modern biotechnological approaches for preparing CGs that do not require plant sources.

  • 10. El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    et al.
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Yosri, Nermeen
    Khatib, Alfi
    Chen, Lei
    Saeed, Aamer
    Efferth, Thomas
    Verpoorte, Rob
    Plants mentioned in the Islamic Scriptures (Holy Qur'an and Ahadith): Traditional uses and medicinal importance in contemporary times2019In: Journal of Ethnopharmacology, ISSN 0378-8741, E-ISSN 1872-7573, Vol. 243, article id 112007Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethnopharmacological relevance: Over the past thousand years, Islamic physicians have collected cultural, philosophical, sociological and historical backgrounds for understanding diseases and medications. The Prophet Mohammed (Peace Be Upon Him (PBUH) said: There is no disease that Allah has created, except that Allah also has created its cure. Therefore, Islamic scholars are encouraged to explore and use both traditional and modern forms of medicine.

    Aim of the study: (1) To identify some of the medicinal plants mentioned in the Holy Qur'an and Ahadith textbooks of the period 700-1500 AD; (2) to compare them with presently used traditional medicines; (3) to evaluate their value based on modern research; and (4) to investigate the contributions of Islamic scholars to the development of the scientific branches, particularly medicine.

    Materials and methods: A literature search was performed relating to 12 medicinal plants mentioned in the Holy Qur'an and Ahadith using textbooks, Al-Azhar scholars, published articles, the plant list website (http://www.theplantlist.org/), the medicinal plant names services website (http://mpns.kew.org/mpns-portal/) and web databases (PubMed, Science Direct, and Google Scholar).

    Results and discussion: The Islamic Golden Age was a step towards modern medicine, with unique insights and multi-disciplinary aspects. Traditional Islamic Medicine has had a significant impact on the development of various medical, scientific and educational activities. Innumerable Muslim and non-Muslim physicians have built on the strong foundation of Traditional Islamic Medicine by translating the described natural remedies and effects. The influences of different ancient cultures on the traditional uses of natural products were also documented in Islamic Scriptures in the last part of the second millennium. The divine teachings of Islam combine natural and practical healing and incorporate inherited science and technology.

    Conclusion: In this review, we discuss Traditional Islamic Medicine with reference to both medical recommendations mentioned in the Holy Qur'an and Prophetic Traditional Medicine (al-Tibb al-Nabawi). Although the molecular mechanisms and functions of some of the listed medicinal plants and their derivatives have been intensively studied, some traditional remedies have yet to be translated into clinical applications.

  • 11.
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Elias, Nizar
    Farag, Mohamed A.
    Chen, Lei
    Saeed, Aamer
    Hegazy, Mohamed-Elamir F.
    Moustafa, Moustafa S.
    Abd El-Wahed, Aida
    Al-Mousawi, Saleh M.
    Musharraf, Syed G.
    Chang, Fang-Rong
    Iwasaki, Arihiro
    Suenaga, Kiyotake
    Alajlani, Muaaz
    Göransson, Ulf
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Marine Natural Products: A Source of Novel Anticancer Drugs2019In: Marine Drugs, ISSN 1660-3397, E-ISSN 1660-3397, Vol. 17, no 9, article id 491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer remains one of the most lethal diseases worldwide. There is an urgent need for new drugs with novel modes of action and thus considerable research has been conducted for new anticancer drugs from natural sources, especially plants, microbes and marine organisms. Marine populations represent reservoirs of novel bioactive metabolites with diverse groups of chemical structures. This review highlights the impact of marine organisms, with particular emphasis on marine plants, algae, bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi, sponges and soft corals. Anti-cancer effects of marine natural products in in vitro and in vivo studies were first introduced; their activity in the prevention of tumor formation and the related compound-induced apoptosis and cytotoxicities were tackled. The possible molecular mechanisms behind the biological effects are also presented. The review highlights the diversity of marine organisms, novel chemical structures, and chemical property space. Finally, therapeutic strategies and the present use of marine-derived components, its future direction and limitations are discussed.

  • 12.
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Farag, Mohamed A.
    Yosri, Nermeen
    Sabir, Jamal S. M.
    Saeed, Aamer
    Al-Mousawi, Saleh Mohammed
    Taha, Wafaa
    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam
    Patel, Seema
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Truffles: From Islamic culture to chemistry, pharmacology, and food trends in recent times2019In: Trends in Food Science & Technology, ISSN 0924-2244, E-ISSN 1879-3053, Vol. 91, p. 193-218Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many years back, during Islamic civilization, truffle (Kama'ah) was mentioned by Prophet Muhammed (PBUH) to be well recognized as a therapeutic for eye diseases. (In the Sahihain, it is narrated that the Prophet said: The Kama'ah (truffle) is among the manna (which is a food mentioned in the Qura'n, Surah alBagarah), and its water (extract or juice) cures the eye diseases). Truffles represent a large group of soil fungi belonging to Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota. Because of their exceptionally profitable protein, fat, polysaccharide, carbohydrate, ash, mineral, phenolic and other organic molecule contents, truffles have been appreciated as food, nutritional and therapeutic sources for many years. Scope and approach: The main aim of this review is to highlight a comprehensive compile of truffles traditional uses, mycochemistry, pharmacological properties and nutritional value with special focus on desert truffles. Such review represents a good candidate reference for future truffle research. Key findings and conclusions: In this review, we discuss the traditional aspects of truffles with reference to Prophetic Traditional Medicine (al-Tibb al-Nabawi) to cure aliments such as trachoma. The use of truffles is justified by many recent research findings with regards to their anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-oxidant, and anti-cancer properties. Although the molecular mechanism and functions of the different truffle species have been intensively studied, we look forward to translating these traditional remedies into preclinical and clinical applications.

  • 13. Salama, Suzy M.
    et al.
    Gwaram, Nura Suleiman
    AlRashdi, Ahmed S.
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Kumamoto University, Japan.
    Abdulla, Mahmood A.
    Ali, Hapipah M.
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    A Zinc Morpholine Complex Prevents HCl/Ethanol-Induced Gastric Ulcers in a Rat Model2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 29646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zinc is a naturally occurring element with roles in wound healing and rescuing tissue integrity, particularly in the gastrointestinal system, where it can be detected in the mucosal and submucosal layers. Zinc chelates are known to have beneficial effects on the gastrointestinal mucosa and in cases of gastric ulcer. We synthesized complexes of zinc featuring a heterocyclic amine binding amino acids then investigated their ability to enhance the gastric self-repair. Zinc-morpholine complex, Zn(L)SCN, namely showed strong free-radical scavenging, promotion of the DNA and RNA polymerases reconstruction and suppression of cell damage. The complex's mode of action is proposed to involve hydrogen bond formation via its bis(thiocyanato-k) zinc moiety. Zn(L) SCN complex had potent effects on gastric enzymatic activity both in vitro and in vivo. The complex disrupted the ulcerative process as demonstrated by changes in the intermediate metabolites of the oxidative pathway - specifically, reduction in the MDA levels and elevation of reduced glutathione together with an attenuation of oxidative DNA damage. Additionally, Zn(L) SCN restored the gastric mucosa, inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF and the caspases), and preserved the gastric mucous balance. Zn(L) SCN thus exhibited anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities, all of which have cytoprotective effects on the gastric lining.

  • 14. Zahra, Maram Hussein
    et al.
    Salem, Tarek A. R.
    El-Aarag, Bishoy
    Yosri, Nermeen
    EL-Ghlban, Samah
    Zaki, Kholoud
    Marei, Amel H.
    Abd El-Wahed, Aida
    Saeed, Aamer
    Khatib, Alfi
    AlAjmi, Mohamed F.
    Shathili, Abdulrahman M.
    Xiao, Jianbo
    Khalifa, Shaden A. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    El-Seedi, Hesham R.
    Alpinia zerumbet (Pers.): Food and Medicinal Plant with Potential In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-Cancer Activities2019In: Molecules, ISSN 1420-3049, E-ISSN 1420-3049, Vol. 24, no 13, article id 2495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aim: Plants play an important role in anti-cancer drug discovery, therefore, the current study aimed to evaluate the biological activity of Alpinia zerumbet (A. zerumbet) flowers. Methods: The phytochemical and biological criteria of A. zerumbet were in vitro investigated as well as in mouse xenograft model. Results: A. zerumbet extracts, specially CH2Cl2 and MeOH extracts, exhibited the highest potent anti-tumor activity against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells. The most active CH2Cl2 extract was subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation leading to isolatation of the naturally occurring 5,6-dehydrokawain (DK) which was characterized by IR, MS, H-1-NMR and C-13-NMR. A. zerumbet extracts, specially MeOH and CH2Cl2 extracts, exhibited significant inhibitory activity towards tumor volume (TV). Furthermore, A. zerumbet extracts declined the high level of malonaldehyde (MDA) as well as elevated the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in liver tissue homogenate. Moreover, DK showed anti-proliferative action on different human cancer cell lines. The recorded IC50 values against breast carcinoma (MCF-7), liver carcinoma (Hep-G2) and larynx carcinoma cells (HEP-2) were 3.08, 6.8, and 8.7 mu g/mL, respectively. Conclusion: Taken together, these findings open the door for further investigations in order to explore the potential medicinal properties of A. zerumbet.

  • 15. Zahran, Moustafa
    et al.
    El-Kemary, Maged
    Khalifa, Shaden
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    El-Seedi, Hesham
    Spectral studies of silver nanoparticles biosynthesized by Origanum majorana2018In: Green Processing and Synthesis, ISSN 2191-9542, E-ISSN 2191-9550, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 100-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were biologically synthesized in an eco-friendly manner using aqueous leaf extract of Origanum majorana plant and silver nitrate (AgNO 3) solution. Size, shape, and crystallinity of the biosynthesized AgNPs were determined by using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Zeta potential analyzer was used to prove the stability of the metallic nanoparticles, while Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to identify the bioreducing and capping agents. AgNPs were electrochemically investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV), while the optical properties of the metallic nanoparticles were studied using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopies. According to TEM images, AgNPs are spherical with an average size of 35 nm. TEM also refers to the presence of mono and polycrystalline AgNPs. The value of zeta potential (-39 mV) proved the stability of AgNPs caused by capping molecules of O. majorana plant. CV studies showed that AgNPs were electrochemically investigated at 0.39 mV. AgNPs showed a surface plasmon resonance peak at 440 nm, while the emission peak was detected at 466 nm. These nanoparticles are promising for many industrial and medical applications.

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