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  • 1.
    Colombage, Ranil Peiris
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Hansson, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    About the challenges in undergraduate research projects: an explorative case study in a Sri Lankan National University2018In: International Journal of Learning, Teaching and Educational Research, ISSN 1694-2493, E-ISSN 1694-2116, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 25-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conducting research and writing a thesis about it is regarded as a distinctive pedagogy (learning through inquiry) within higher education which brings new challenges to all parties involved. To complete a thesis, students should select a problem, make a systematic plan, implement the plan and, finally, write a report of the process and findings. Students do have a supervisor to guide and support them, but it is the student who plays the key role in the whole research process. The present study is a qualitative, explorative case study to understand the challenges related to research projects within undergraduate management degree programmes in a Sri Lankan national University. Data have been collected using interviews and focus group discussions in six-degree programmes, with around 40 participants in total. The study focuses on identifying problematic areas and creating a general picture of why students’ research projects are not progressing favourably. Six main challenges were identified: student motivation, student-supervisor relationships, skills and knowledge, students’ workload, the structure of the research project course, and resources and ICT tools. These problematic areas are complex and multidimensional. Therefore, further studies are required to truly understand the complex interrelatedness of these areas.

  • 2.
    Drougge, Ulrika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Männikkö, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mozelius, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Going Global – Lessons learned from developing an online Master’s in ICT4D2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Information and Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D) is a rapidly expanding field where successful outcomes require interdisciplinary collaborations. Stakeholders involved in ICT4D projects have a wide variety of educational backgrounds and ICT4D training. Literature and education on ICT4D has been compared to a lost sheep but currently there exists six master programmes in ICT4D at university level (University of Colorado, Boulder, Berkeley University of California, University of Cape Town, Royal Holloway University of London, University of East London and University of Manchester). However, none of these existing programmes are entirely available online and possible to complete by distance studies only. The aim of the present study is to analyse and discuss the needs and requirements for a master’s programme in ICT4D given entirely online as distance education. Applicants to a new online master’s programme developed at the Department of Computer and Systems Sciences at Stockholm University have responded to an online questionnaire on what they find important in an ICT4D programme. Findings show that even though online education has been around for quite a while, there are still a lot of issues to address and globally oriented distance education does have particular pedagogical, cultural, administrative and technical challenges. The lack of interdisciplinary programmes in ICT4D is evident and we definitely think that there is a need for a new master’s programme that is given in distance mode only. Furthermore, our vision is to open up the programme in the line of open access principles in a near future when course content and pedagogical ideas have been evaluated more in detail.

  • 3.
    Käck, Annika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Männikkö Barbutiu, SirkkuStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Digital kompetens i lärarutbildningen: ett integrationsperspektiv.2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Digital kompetens är i dagens samhälle en lika viktig kompetens som att kunna läsa och skriva. Därför ska den integreras i all utbildning. Begreppet är dock komplext och föränderligt med många tolkningar. Författarna i denna bok har definierat begreppet som digital teoretisk, didaktisk och teknisk kompetens. Till boken hör ett par filmer och en filmhandledning som inspirerar till arbete enligt bokens riktlinjer för lärarutbildningar, skolor och andra intressenter. Boken presenterar ett holistiskt angreppssätt för integreringen av digital kompetens i högre utbildning, särskilt i lärarutbildningen. Med ett integrationsperspektiv, menar författarna, är det möjligt att synliggöra vilka kompetensutvecklingsbehov som finns samt systematiskt granska och utveckla innehållet i utbildningen. Målet är integration av digital kompetens på ett hållbart sätt i en (utbildnings)organisation där förnyelse och kollegialt samarbete genomsyrar verksamheten. Mer teoretiska kapitel varvas med erfarenheter från författarnas utvecklingsarbete. Dessutom presenteras konkreta modeller och övningar som kan användas både på organisations- och individnivå. Boken vänder sig till lärarutbildare, ansvariga för lärarutbildning, pedagogiska utvecklare och alla som är intresserade av att integrera IT och digital kompetens i högre utbildning. Den är även relevant för andra organisationer som stöd i ett kompetensutvecklingsarbete.

  • 4.
    Käck, Annika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Männikkö-Barbutiu, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Vad är digital kompetens?2012In: Digital kompetens i lärarutbildningen: Ett integrationsperspektiv / [ed] Annika Käck, Sirkku Männikkö, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, 1, p. 15-23Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna del beskriver vi hur digital kompetens finns i skolans och lärarutbildningens styrdokument. Vi återger vår tolkning av digital kompetens och presenterar den modell som vuxit fram utifrån våra erfarenheter. 

  • 5.
    Käck, Annika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Roll-Pettersson, Lise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Alai-Rosales, Shahla S.
    Høium, Kari
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Fors, Uno G. H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Intercultural Blended Design Considerations: a Case Study of a Nordic-Baltic Course in Autism Intervention2014In: European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning, ISSN 1027-5207, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 93-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Specialized educational programs previously unavailable to many students are now accessible to students spread throughout the world. In particular, this globalization presents new opportunities and challenges for universities educating professionals in the field of autism treatment. The aim of the present case study is to analyse the experiences of students who participated in an intercultural graduate level blended learning course in applied behaviour analysis with an autism focus. Students were enrolled in universities in four Nordic-Baltic countries. Country based focus group interviews and surveys were used to explore student’s experiences and perceptions. Results indicate that access to expertise and interacting with other cultures were noted to positively affect learning experience. Risk for cultural divide due to discrepancies in technology, differing pedagogical traditions, and understanding of English were also reported. Implications regarding the potential risks and benefits inherent in intercultural blended learning courses are discussed and suggestions are offered for enhancing the success of such courses.

  • 6.
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Challenges of participation in cross-cultural action research2016In: International Journal of Action Research, ISSN 1861-1303, E-ISSN 1861-9916, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 224-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the challenges of conducting participatory action research in cross-cultural contexts where different historical, political, social, and cultural backgrounds of the participants mark the interaction are discussed. Empirical data is drawn from a one-year educational development project including participants residing in a country in Sub Saharan Africa and in a country in Northern Europe. As participation is one of the crucial and controversial issues in conducting action research, it is scrutinised through several key incidents that took place during the project period. These will illustrate the complex dynamics of collaboration between the participating actors, such as researchers and teachers educators on one hand, and schoolteachers on the other, who came together to conduct participatory action research. In the concluding discussion, the importance and challenges of exercising participatory practices, nurturing collaboration beyond differences are further elaborated and some recommendations presented.

  • 7.
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Multimodalt och digitalt2012In: Digital kompetens i lärarutbildningen: ett integrationsperspektiv / [ed] Annika Käck, Sirkku Männikkö Barbutiu, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, no 0, p. 95-100Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Practicum as transition2014In: ATEE Annual Conference 2014 - Transitions in teacher education and professional identities: Proceedings, ATEE - Association for Teacher Education in Europe , 2014, p. 37-46Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In our previous research, we have claimed that practicum is both under-developed and under-theorized (Mattsson et al., 2011). This study builds on earlier international collaborative projects aimed at understanding the development of professional practice knowledge during the practicum in teacher education. Notions that emerge in these studies as critical include ‘communicative spaces’, ‘empowering relationships’ and ‘memorable/purposeful encounters’. For further exploration of these concepts, we have initiated research on the mentoring dialogues between student teachers and their supervisors during the practicum. This paper reports on a study of mentoring dialogues with the aim of understanding: How can the communicative space be transformed to enhance the learning of professional practice? The analysis is done in the frame of the Habermasian theory of ‘communicative action’ (Habermas, 1984, 1987). In the case of mentoring dialogues, we could argue that the individual lifeworlds of the three actors – preservice teacher, teacher educator and mentoring teacher – encounter not only each other but also the system of practicum and teacher education, which conditions the communicative actions / mentoring dialogues. Habermas suggests that there is a deliberative potential in the communicative action leading towards social integration and solidarity. This gives us an opening to attach transformative hopes to the mentoring dialogues as empowering third spaces ” … where the potential for an expanded form of learning and the development of new knowledge are heightened” (Gutiérrez 2008, p.152). The analysis is based on a number (18) authentic mentoring dialogues that have been (audio) recorded. Transcripts have been analysed through grounded research methods which have revealed critical phenomena/themes. The analysis indicates that the introductory mentoring dialogue is set up by the teacher educator who represents the institutional organisation and makes the interpretation of the goals and structure and process defined in the steering documents. She takes the lead. Even though the practicum rhetoric emphasizes that the mentoring dialogue is owned by the student, it is the teacher educator who sets the agenda. The study raises a general concern of how teacher education can support student teachers in their transition from a novice to a professional teacher. In the case of mentoring dialogues, it is important to understand the mechanisms of the dialogues as communicative actions and how the communicative space could be scaffolded in order to support the transition. As the study is part of a wider international research endeavor, it will contribute not only to the national educational research on practicum in teacher education but it will also add to the European dimension of collaborative and comparative research where local ideas and experiences can nurture and develop the international collective. Practicum as transition is crucial in the joint effort of strengthening European education through professional and competent teachers.

  • 9.
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Utvecklingsarbete inom en institution2012In: Digital kompetens i lärarutbildningen: ett integrationsperspektiv / [ed] Annika Käck, Sirkku Männikkö Barbutiu, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2012, no 0, p. 49-61Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite numerous and costly development projects ICT still plays only a limited role in the teacher education program which should prepare teachers for future generations of digital natives. The chapter describes a two year project with the attempt to take a holistic and integrative approach to ICT in teacher education within a university department. A development group as a core of activities, the whole department is engaged in competence development and course development in an interdisciplinary and collegial manner encouraging individuals to explore novel ways of working in an environment where ICT plays a natural role. Members of the development group give support to each other and the other colleagues in the department and create thus an environment for expansive learning.

  • 10.
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Gao, Shuting
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Käck, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Olsson, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Communicative spaces in MOOCs and Swedish Study Circles2015In: Proceedings of Global Learn 2015 / [ed] Theo Bastiaens, Gary Marks, Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education, 2015, p. 536-540Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have become a common feature in higher education. The idea of opening up education for a wider population has been welcomed by many. How these new learning environments correspond to the requirements of individual learning is an issue of vital importance. In this paper, we will examine the MOOC phenomenon with the theoretical lense of Habermas influenced communicative space and compare the MOOC environment with that of Swedish Study Circles. Our examination suggests that the strong democratic and collaborative tradition of study circles might provide MOOC designers with a model that can help scaffolding MOOC education in ways beneficial to individual learners.

  • 11.
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Käck, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Digital literacy in teacher education – an integration model2013In: Learning & Teaching with Media & Technology: ATEE-SIREM Winter Conference Proceedings / [ed] Parmigiani Davide, Pennazio Valentina, Traverso Andrea, Brussels: Association for Teacher Education in Europe , 2013, p. 111-121Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teacher education in Sweden has been subject to criticism for not providing teachers-to-be with relevant knowledge and skills concerning the pedagogical use of ICT. Only as late as in 2005 a nationwide investment was launched and three projects commenced with the overall aim of enhancing ICT competence within teacher education. One of the projects was called LIKA (Learning, Information, Communication, Administration) which brought together four institutions of higher education in Stockholm region. This six-year project engaged approx. 600 teacher educators and 6 000 pre-service teachers in 245 different activities with the scope of integrating digital literacy in teacher education programs within the participating institutions. The project developed a holistic model for integration of ICT with digital literacy as a key concept including theoretical, didactic/pedagogical, and technical competences. In a holistic model, digital literacy is established both on the individual and organizational levels with the goal of developing a learning organization where collaborative knowledge creation and learning constitute vital parts of everyday actions. This can be obtained through long term commitment of all personnel in systematic improvement of courses and curricula through experimentation and competence development.

  • 12.
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Käck, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    INTEGRATING DIGITAL LITERACY IN TEACHER EDUCATION - THE PERPETUAL CHALLENGE OF A LEARNING ORGANIZATION2016In: EDULEARN16: Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres, The International Academy of Technology, Education and Development, 2016, p. 4255-4264Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish teacher education has been subject to criticism for not providing teachers-to-be with sufficient training in the pedagogical use of ICTs. In 2005, a nationwide initiative was launched by the Swedish Knowledge Foundation to improve this situation in teacher education. One of the projects, called LIKA (Learning, Information, Communication, Administration), brought together four institutions of higher education in Stockholm region to integrate ICTs in teacher education. This six-year project engaged approx. 600 teacher educators and 6 000 teacher students in 245 different activities. In this paper, we analyze the experiences from LIKA project that aimed at taking a novel approach to ICT implementation combining the latest technology with participatory and collaborative approaches to teaching and learning. The project applied a holistic model emphasizing at one hand the importance of regarding theoretical, pedagogical, and technical competences as equally relevant parts of digital literacy, and on the other hand, the importance of including all aspects of teaching profession into the system of competence development i.e. Learning, Information, Communication and Administration. In a follow-up survey we examined whether the central ideas from LIKA project still define the competence development and organizational learning activities at departments, which are involved in teacher education, and what kind of new developments have taken place since the end of the project period in 2013. The survey responses indicate that crucial issues for the integration of digital literacy remain the same over the years: how to create and maintain a learning organization in the academic environment of higher education, and how to preserve a functioning, up-to-date notion of digital literacy. Our respondents maintain that digital literacy has increasingly become a part of everyday practices in teacher education. However, the challenges of dispersed teacher education programs involving several departments and the strenuous working conditions of teacher educators make it hard to develop the notion of digital literacy and make ICTs an inspiring part of their pedagogic practice.

  • 13.
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rorrison, Doreen
    Practicum as a participatory praxis?2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Our research on student teachers’ practicum experiences suggests that the mentoring dialogue (Hennissen et al., 2008) between the student teacher, mentoring teacher at school and the teacher educator at the teacher education institution does not always support the development of student teachers but leaves the central experiences during the practicum unprocessed. Thus, teacher education is missing an important opportunity to enhance learning of the student teachers. Recent developments in teacher education imply that practicum could again be considered as a central part of the teacher education (practicum turn). The latest reform (2011) in teacher education in Sweden changes the position of practicum from a fragmented part of all courses into a separate unified entity. Practicum architecture (Kemmis & Grootenboer, 2008) includes now features that are considered as supportive and developmental to the practicum experience of student teachers. The mentoring dialogue now includes student teacher, mentor teacher at school and the teacher educator. Mentoring dialogue has an assessment purpose but it should also be developmental in nature and give student teacher guidance during the practicum. Mentoring teachers are to be trained in mentoring through a specific course which should add into the participatory and empowering dimension of practicum as a tool for school development. Another feature that has been introduced is the digital portfolio which is student teacher’s tool for documentation and reflection. The reflective paradigm within mentoring (Pajak, 1993) has long been prevailing but unsuccessful in bringing systematic and contextual meaning to the actual exercise of reflection. In our research on practicum as a participatory praxis, the inquiry is focused on the mentoring dialogue and the possibilities of using it as a way to promote cooperation between teacher education institutions and schools in order to develop both teacher education and schools. In the pilot phase of this inquiry we have been asking mentoring teachers and teacher educators how they see the mentoring dialogue and how they would like to develop it (identification, praxis and vision). The pilot study included a number of mentoring teachers/teacher educators in Sweden and Australia. The analysis of their responses suggests that there exists a general agreement on the centrality of the mentoring dialogue and the experiences of the student teachers during the practicum. However, the practicum architecture and other structural conditions influence if not hinder the realisation of visions and the actual praxis remains a shallow compromise between various interests and requirements.

  • 14.
    Männikkö, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Developing teaching in technology: from isolation to cooperation2011In: Positioning technology education in the curriculum / [ed] Marc J. de Vries, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers , 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The position of technology as a school subject in Sweden is discussed in the light of a development and research project where a group of technology teachers and researchers worked together in order to develop content and ways of working for technology classes. The historically marginal position of technology as a school subject makes it difficult for teachers to work with the subject. They lack formal training, confidence and collegial support and find it difficult to realize the goals in the syllabus. The development project has given the teachers tools to work with technology by answering their what-how-when questions concerning technology teaching. The project has shown the importance of cooperation between teachers in different subjects. The integration of technology into other subjects strengthens its position giving it more space in the curriculum. Also, it makes technology more visible and defines it in ways that make meaning to pupils.

  • 15.
    Männikkö, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Development group as context for expansive learning?: About attempts to integrate ICT in teacher education2011In: REM Research on Education and Media, ISSN 2037-0849, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 27-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite numerous and costly development projects ICT still plays only a limited role in the teacher education program which should prepare teachers for future generations of digital natives. This article describes a two year project with the attempt to take a holistic and integrative approach to ICT in teacher education within a university department. A development group as a core of activities, the whole department is engaged in competence development and course development in an interdisciplinary and collegial manner encouraging individuals to explore novel ways of working in an environment where ICT plays a natural role. Members of the development group give support to each other and the other colleagues in the department and create thus an environment for expansive learning.

  • 16.
    Männikkö, Sirkku
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rorrison, Doreen
    Memorable encounters: learning narratives from preservice teachers' practicum2011In: A practicum turn in teacher education / [ed] Matts Mattsson, Tor Vidar Eilertsen and Doreen Rorrison, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 2011, no 0Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Practicum is an important part of the teacher education program and an important part of becoming a teacher. We believe that to understand the conditions and processes of practicum, special attention needs to be focused on the preservice teachers' own accounts of their practicum learning experiences. The chapter explores practicum learning from the preservice teacher prespective. A parallell study has been conducted with Australian, Chinese and Swedish preservice teachers in an effort to identify the distinguishing features of each context. Through gaining a greater awareness of the particularities of the lived experience of the preservice teachers and the mediating preconditions that frame the practicum in these three countries, we can contribute to our common knowledge about teacher education in general and the practicum in particular. The preservice teachers' narratives expose strongly personal and individual learning encounters with themes of enactment, revelation and transformation.

  • 17.
    Männikkö-Barbutiu, Sirkku
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Perera, Harsha
    Anuradha, Upul
    Peiris, Ranil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Westin, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Supporting Sustainability Through Collaborative Awareness Raising – A Case of Sri Lankan Telecentres2017In: Information and Communication Technologies for Development: 14th IFIP WG 9.4 International Conference on Social Implications of Computers in Developing Countries, ICT4D 2017, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, May 22-24, 2017, Proceedings / [ed] Jyoti Choudrie, M. Sirajul Islam, Fathul Wahid, Julian M. Bass, Johanes Eka Priyatma, Springer, 2017, p. 410-421Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the development of sustainable ICT services, participation of the local communities is crucial. A meaningful involvement requires awareness and understanding of the various possibilities of the ICTs. In this paper, the processes of awareness raising among underprivileged population in the Sri Lankan tea estate district of Nuwara Eliya are examined, drawing on the findings from an empirical study conducted at two telecentres. A specific participatory methodology, where co-inspirational sessions and brainstorming constituted main activities of co-creation of knowledge was applied. Our empirical data confirms that the participatory methods can trigger curiosity and engagement among participants. Ideas and suggestions that emerged during brainstorming demonstrate relevance, realism as well as they are a proof of real needs and requirements of a population that lives under difficult conditions in remote locations. Participatory methods can initiate community engagement for a longstanding, sustainable transformation of the TCs, in collaboration with ICT developers, and TC staff.

  • 18.
    Männikkö-Barbutiu, Sirkku
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Thorgersen, Ketil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Education in Arts and Professions.
    Zackrisson, Katarina Sipos
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Education in Arts and Professions.
    International Collaboration – New Form of Colonialism?: A study of the construction of similarities amongst participants in an action research project2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Männikkö-Barbutiu, Sirkku
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Westin, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Peiris, Ranil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mozelius, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Telecenters for the Future in Tea Estates of Sri Lanka2016In: ICT for Promoting Human Development and Protecting the Environment: 6th IFIP World Information Technology Forum, WITFOR 2016 San José, Costa Rica, September 12–14, 2016 Proceedings / [ed] Francisco J. Mata, Ana Pont, 2016, p. 121-131Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on a study conducted at one of the Sri Lankan tea estate districts, exploring the present day status of telecenters to examine how they have succeeded in meeting the initial high expectations attached to them. During a field study, two major types of telecenters have been examined through observations, interviews and document analysis. Our findings suggest that the challenges of the initiation phase still prevail. The hopes are placed on the younger generation, as they are regarded as those who can benefit from the ICTs and thus contribute to the development of the remote communities of tea estates. In the concluding discussion, we advocate for the possibilities of co-designing new services that might help to transform the telecenters to meet the needs and requirements of the tea estate communities of today and tomorrow.

  • 20.
    Nykvist, Bengt
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Käck, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Larsson, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    MOOCs and Developing Regions: from Adoption to Adaptations2014In: Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Writers Hut 2014, August 21-22, Åkersberga, Stockholm: Department of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    MOOCs or Massive Open Online Courses have emerged in the discourse of the present day higher education as a solution for the 21st century educational challenges. This paper discusses how realistic and appropriate the original ideas of MOOCs are in the wider, global context, particularly in the context of developing regions. Do MOOCs promote democratization of education by making it accessible to all? Or do they reinforce educational hegemony of the Western world thus constituting a further link in the history of cultural imperialism of the global North over the global South? We will argue in this paper that in order to open up education through MOOCs, local adaptations are required. The contextualization of MOOCs, particularly pedagogical and linguistic considerations, are examined and design recommendations formulated.

  • 21.
    Peiris, Ranil
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mozelius, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Westin, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Bridging the Digital Divide in Sri Lankan Tea Estate Areas2015In: Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Social Implications of Computers in Developing Countries / [ed] Petter Nielsen, Oslo: University of Oslo , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sri Lanka is characterised by rapid economic growth combined with fast technological advancements. However, these advancements do not reach out to the entire society. The purpose of this paper is to examine the manifestations of the internal digital divide in the Sri Lankan tea estate context. With their particular history and socioeconomic structures, tea estate areas face serious challenges in bringing their whole population into the 21st century where digital literacy plays a crucial role in facilitating a full participation in the society. This study analyses the digital divide with a specific perspective on gender issues and people with disabilities. We discuss the role of education, social-economic structures, cultures and languages in the manifestations of the digital divide. We also examine the telecentre projects and their role in the effort of bridging the digital divide as they provide access to the information and communication technology (ICT) and the Internet as well as they provide training in digital literacies. We comment on the potential of open data movement underlining the crucial role of education and training in the process of citizen empowerment.

  • 22. Rolandsson, Lennart
    et al.
    Skogh, Inga-Britt
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Bridging a gap: in search of an analytical tool capturing teachers’ perceptions of their own teaching2017In: International journal of technology and design education, ISSN 0957-7572, E-ISSN 1573-1804, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 445-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computing and computers are introduced in school as important examples of technology, sometimes as a subject matter of their own, and sometimes they are used as tools for other subjects, but in principle, learning about computers is part of learning about technology. Lately, the programming is being implemented in curricula to explain society’s dependence on programming knowledge and code. However, there are some issues related to teaching programming, as the questions of what and how to teach become urgent in the rapid change of technology. In this present study the subject related focus characterizing phenomenography and variation theory is shifted to teacher related matters. This aim to explore the connection or possible gap between subject and subject representatives (teachers) raises the need for an expansion of the existing conceptual apparatus. To deepen our understanding of teachers’ teaching, von Wright’s theoretical model of logic of events is introduced as a complementary analytical tool. In the article the two theoretical approaches (phenomenography and logic of events) are briefly presented. The two theoretical approaches are then deployed upon one teacher’s case. Findings reveal that teachers’ intentions (reflected in their actions) include an emphasis (of teachers' side) regarding the importance of balancing theory and practice, using different learning strategies, encouraging learning by trial-and-error and fostering collaboration between students for a deeper understanding of concepts. In conclusion, logic of events interpretations prove to be useful as a complementary tool to the phenomenographic conceptual apparatus.

  • 23. Rorrison, Doreen
    et al.
    Hennissen, Paul
    Bonanno, Philip
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Problematising Practicum Arrangements: Sharing experiences from different traditions and contexts2016In: Educating the Best Teachers: a Challenge for Teacher Education: Proceedings of the 41st Annual ATEE Conference / [ed] Quinta Kools, Bob Koster, Anouke Bakx, Paul Hennissen, Leids Congres Bureau, ATEE - Association for Teacher Education in Europe, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Our 2016 ATEE presentation was an active presentation where arrangements of practicum from four different countries were presented, discussed and problematised. Based on the conclusions drawn in the volume “A Practicum Turn in Teacher Education” (Mattsson, Eilertsen, & Rorrison, 2011), these arrangements would be situated within current and emerging theories related to professional experience. After the presentation delegates would be invited to present their own experiences of practicum arrangements or models, through interactive activities, then situate them within the emerging theories and concepts. The introduction was based on the above edited volume and the concept of renewed interest in practice knowledge and frameworks for organizing practicum. A major contribution of the volume is a list of practicum ‘models’ that emerges and is theorised as ways of describing how practicum learning might be organised (Chapter 12). As our international collaboration has developed and our discussions have widened we remain committed to developing a deeper understanding of these practicum arrangements both within our local contexts and with a wider lens. We are aware that practicum arrangements are developed incorporating several models and consequently we are suggesting a move from a descriptive view based on ‘models’ to a process-oriented view based on ‘arrangements’. We see this as a natural evolution, as what is actually happening in different contexts is that those responsible for professional learning are creating their own arrangements to meet the needs or constraints of their context. The different arrangements of practicum were presented by members of the International Network of Practicum Research and Development, representing four countries. An arrangement that combines theory and practice in a curriculum was presented (Paul Hennissen, Netherlands), followed by emergent partnerships and technology (Philip Bonanno, Malta), then Doreen Rorrison (Australia) provided an overview of a range of different programs and finally mentoring dialogues within practicum (Sirkku Männikkö Barbutiu, Sweden) were discussed. Participants were asked to respond to the emerging concept of ‘evolved’ practicum arrangements by presenting their own stories of practicum situating them within the key elements of the conceptual models. Unfortunately the next step of aligning their tentative ‘models’ with one of the presented models and theorising the ‘arrangements’ within the new concept of evolving models was cancelled due to the scheduling change that allowed only one hour. Our brief was to provide a presentation that was empowering for teacher educators who were interested in sharing and problematising their practices related to practicum. By sharing what works and what kind of arrangements there are in practicum learning, it was hoped participants would develop their understandings of their own emergent arrangement. Through guiding delegates to an evolving view of practicum, it was hoped that they would be in a position to build new theories to share and critique and take back to their workplace. Although the range of countries represented (20 delegates from 12 countries) added to the richness of the discussion it also limited the impact where quite different arrangements were described with traditions and language so disparate that sharing and problematising was difficult.

  • 24. Rorrison, Doreen
    et al.
    Männikkö, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Practicum as participatory and empowering practice?2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Tedre, Matti
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Brash, Danny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Männikkö-Barbutiu, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cronjé, Johannes
    Towards Identification and Classification of Core and Threshold Concepts in Methodology Education in Computing2014In: "ITICSE '14: proceedings of the 2014 Innovation & Technology in Computer Science Education Conference, New York: ACM Press, 2014, p. -242Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research methodology is a quintessential component of science, but methods differ greatly between sciences. In computing, methods are borrowed from many fields, which causes difficulties to methodology education in computing. In our methodology courses in computing, we have observed a number of core and threshold concepts that affect students’ success. This essay describes a work in progress towards under- standing those core and threshold concepts in methodology education in computing, classified along two dimensions. We classify methodological concepts in terms of standard elements of research design in students’ projects in computing, and in terms of their centrality and difficulty. We present examples of three types of troublesome knowledge concerning methodology: the strangeness and complexity of methodological concepts, misimpressions from everyday experience, and reasonable but mistaken expectations.

  • 26.
    Westin, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Männikkö Barbutiu, Sirkku
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Perera, Harsha
    Anuradha, Upul
    Game Based Learning of Programming in Underprivileged Communities of Sri Lanka2016In: Proceedings of the 10th European Conference on Games Based Learning: The University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, Scotland, 6-7 October 2016 / [ed] Thomas Connolly, Liz Boyle, Academic Conferences Publishing, 2016, p. 773-780Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Game based learning (GBL) has emerged during the last decade in so-called high-income countries with good access to computers, while many low and middle-income countries are starting to explore GBL and its potential in education. For instance, the increased use of smartphones in Sri Lanka provides better opportunities to play games. Furthermore, a first GBL course at the University of Colombo was organised in 2015. In this study, an effort to raise awareness of the various possibilities of ICTs within underprivileged communities of Sri Lanka was made. A free, web-based game for learning programming was used at two different telecentres during three workshops, with three different age groups: 1) 14 students aged 10-18; 2) 19 students aged 8-16; and 3) 18 school leavers aged 15-20. Telecentres are places providing access to computers, Internet and various services. The progress of participants through the game was observed and notes were taken during the workshops, followed up by group interviews, and a survey of all participants. Our findings show that the participants found the game to be fun and of medium difficulty level. They also expressed that they need to learn English better and improve their computer skills to be able to learn more programming. Despite the limited Internet access, limited number of computers, and language barriers, most students and school leavers completed between 10 to 15 puzzles, including programming concepts of commands, conditions and events. The youngest participants (8 years old) completed at least 5 puzzles. From our results we conclude that without prior programming experience, all the participants became motivated to learn more about programming within the 1.5 hours of the workshop with this GBL approach. This indicates that the learning curve of the GBL approach to learn programming is considerably low whereas the motivation to learn through GBL is high. Furthermore, the GBL approach has good potential to raise awareness of learning opportunities at telecentres. Skills in programming games and related ICT skills can be beneficial for the whole community; it may enable further development of services and designs addressing the local needs. In our future work we aim to follow-up through online communication with the participants regarding how they can continue to learn more about programming and other ICT skills.

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