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  • 1.
    Frankenberg, Sofia J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Mapping Ethics With the Digital Maps Metaphor: Addressing Raised Eyebrows and Bolded Question Marks in Relation to Developmental Test Methodology2018In: Mind, Brain, and Education, ISSN 1751-2271, E-ISSN 1751-228X, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 2-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Digital Maps Metaphor (DMM) is suggested as a transdisciplinary research tool to overcome some of the challenges that are potentially inherent in research projects that involve multiple aims, objectives, knowledge claims, and methodologies. Based on the understanding of metaphors as embodied concepts, it is argued that the DMM can be used to structure mappings of the different rationalities within transdisciplinary projects. The advantage of the DMM is illustrated by the metaphor's application to a comprehensive transdisciplinary intervention study in Swedish preschools. The structural mapping brings forth a number of contradictions between the Childhood Map, the Critical and Micro‐political map, and the Developmental map. Potentials for new emergent understandings, facilitated by the metaphor, are suggested for the benefit of children's learning and development. Empirical studies of the effectiveness of the metaphor should be the next step in order to assess its usefulness in different educational and scientific contexts.

  • 2.
    Frankenberg, Sofia J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Lenz-Taguchi, Hillevi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Bodén, Linnea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Kjällander, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Tonér, Signe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Bidirectional collaborations in an intervention randomized controlled trial performed in the Swedish early childhood education context2018In: Journal of Cognition and Development, ISSN 1524-8372, E-ISSN 1532-7647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the field of developmental science, there is a general agreement of the need to work together across academic disciplinary boundaries in order to advance the understandings of how to optimize child development and learning. However, experience also shows that such collaborations may be challenging. This paper reports on the experiences of bidirectional collaboration between researchers in a multidisciplinary research team and between researchers and stakeholders, in the first randomized controlled trial in Swedish preschool. The objective of the trial was to investigate the effects of two pedagogical learning strategies evaluating language, communication, attention, executive functions and early math. The interdisciplinary team includes researchers from early childhood education, linguistics, developmental psychology and cognitive neuro science. Educational researchers and theorists within the field of early childhood education in Sweden have during the last two decades mainly undertaken small-scale qualitative praxis-oriented and participative research. There is a widespread skepticism with regards to some of the core principles in controlled intervention methodologies, including a strong resistance towards individual testing of children. Consequently unanticipated disagreements and conflicts arose within the research team, as RCT methodology requires the measurement of effects pre and post the intervention. The aim of this article is to discuss the conditions for bidirectional collaboration both between researchers and stakeholders and between researchers in the research team. The findings illustrate strategies and negotiations that emerged in order to address ontological and epistemological controversies and disagreements. These include (a) the negotiation of research ethics, (b) making divergences visible and learning from each other, (c) using a multi-epistemological and methodological approach as a complement to the RCT design and (d) the negotiation of research problems that are shared between educators and researchers.

  • 3.
    Frankenberg, Sofia Johnson
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Rubenson, Birgitta
    In Earlier Days Everyone Could Discipline Children, Now They Have Rights': Caregiving Dilemmas of Guidance and Control in Urban Tanzania2014In: Journal of Community and Applied Social Phychology, ISSN 1052-9284, E-ISSN 1099-1298, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 191-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Caregiving practices in Tanzania are potentially affected by socio-demographic change such as urbanization and globalization. The aim of this study is to explore adult caregivers' discourses regarding the responsibility of caregiving, related to guidance and control of children in Tanzania. Data was collected in focus group discussions with parents and grandparents in an urban area of Tanzania. The analysis found two interpretative repertoires: guidance and control as a community matter and guidance and control as a family matter. These repertoires are related to responsibility and to an ideological dilemma regarding parental authority and individual's rights. The findings are discussed in relation to the tendency to polarize between ideologically traditional versus modern societies. This illustrates how lived ideology of caregiving responsibility is historically and socially situated, in the local context and how the spread of Children's Rights ideology needs to be understood in this context.

  • 4.
    Gerholm, Tove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Hörberg, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Perception and psychophysics.
    Tonér, Signe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Frankenberg, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Kjällander, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Palmer, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Lenz Taguchi, Hillevi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    A protocol for a three-arm cluster randomized controlled superiority trial investigating the effects of two pedagogical methodologies in Swedish preschool settings on language and communication, executive functions, auditive selective attention, socioemotional skills and early maths skills2018In: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 6, article id 29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    During the preschool years, children develop abilities and skills in areas crucial for later success in life. These abilities include language, executive functions, attention, and socioemotional skills. The pedagogical methods used in preschools hold the potential to enhance these abilities, but our knowledge of which pedagogical practices aid which abilities, and for which children, is limited. The aim of this paper is to describe an intervention study designed to evaluate and compare two pedagogical methodologies in terms of their effect on the above-mentioned skills in Swedish preschool children.

    Method

    The study is a randomized control trial (RCT) where two pedagogical methodologies were tested to evaluate how they enhanced children’s language, executive functions and attention, socioemotional skills, and early maths skills during an intensive 6-week intervention. Eighteen preschools including 28 units and 432 children were enrolled in a municipality close to Stockholm, Sweden. The children were between 4;0 and 6;0 years old and each preschool unit was randomly assigned to either of the interventions or to the control group. Background information on all children was collected via questionnaires completed by parents and preschools. Pre- and post-intervention testing consisted of a test battery including tests on language, executive functions, selective auditive attention, socioemotional skills and early maths skills. The interventions consisted of 6 weeks of intensive practice of either a socioemotional and material learning paradigm (SEMLA), for which group-based activities and interactional structures were the main focus, or an individual, digitally implemented attention and math training paradigm, which also included a set of self-regulation practices (DIL). All preschools were evaluated with the ECERS-3.

    Discussion

    If this intervention study shows evidence of a difference between group-based learning paradigms and individual training of specific skills in terms of enhancing children’s abilities in fundamental areas like language, executive functions and attention, socioemotional skills and early math, this will have big impact on the preschool agenda in the future. The potential for different pedagogical methodologies to have different impacts on children of different ages and with different backgrounds invites a wider discussion within the field of how to develop a preschool curriculum suited for all children.

  • 5.
    Johnson Frankenberg, Sofia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Rindstedt, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Rubenson, Birgitta
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Being and becoming a responsible caregiver: Negotiating guidance and control in family interaction in Tanzania2013In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 487-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how siblings in Tanzania actively engage in their own socialization through the negotiation and local design of caregiving practices and control between younger siblings (age 1-3), older siblings (age 3-13) and adults. Analyses of moment-to-moment embodied, multimodal sequences of interaction illustrate how caregiving responsibility is negotiated. The analysis is multidisciplinary drawing on concepts developed in the traditions of sociology, language socialization and applied linguistics. The findings highlight the usefulness of a concept of socialization which recognizes the agency of the child and are discussed in relation to constructions of the caregiving child as both being and becoming.

  • 6.
    Kjällander, Susanne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Johnsson Frankenberg, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    How to design a digital individual learning RCT-study in the context of the Swedish preschool: experiences from a pilot study2018In: International Journal of Research and Method in Education, ISSN 1743-727X, E-ISSN 1743-7288, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 433-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article takes its point of departure in the research methodology of a comprehensive and multi-disciplinary innovative intervention study in Swedish preschools with preschoolers aged 3–5, involving two digital learning games focusing early math and executive functions. Based on a combination of video-ethnography, focus groups, field notes and digital progression log data, the analysis of a pilot study of the pedagogical intervention challenges and extends theoretical and methodological perspectives on what it means to undertake an intervention study in this context. The aim is to discuss what a mixed-methods research approach may provide for the understanding of intervention methodology by illustrating how different types of data provide understandings of how and to what extent the intervention components are functional in the pedagogical setting. The conclusion the analysis supports is that unless children’s and preschool teachers’ meaning making of the unfolding actions in the digital interface make them engage in the activity and dynamically fits within the institutional preschool system, the intervention will not be functional. A pilot study can provide detailed understandings of why, how and in what contexts interventions as part of the dynamic preschool systems can be implemented with adherence and fidelity.

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