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  • 1.
    Han, Gül Bilge
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Bethlehem, Louise
    Introduction: Cultural Solidarities2018In: Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Comparative Studies, ISSN 1753-3171, E-ISSN 1543-1304, Vol. 19, no 3Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    "... A casement opening on the spectacle of the world": Post-European texts in translation2011In: Foundational texts of world literature / [ed] Dominique Jullien, New York: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2011, p. 191-205Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Ambivalent evolution: Euclides da Cunha, Olive Schreiner and the (de)colonising of history2011In: Rethinking time: essays on history, memory, and representation / [ed] Hans Ruin; Andrus Ers, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2011, p. 217-226Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    An Ecology of World Literature: From Antiquity to the Present Day by Alexander Beecroft2017In: Comparative literature studies (Urbana), ISSN 0010-4132, E-ISSN 1528-4212, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 234-239Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Den spjälkade tiden: Kolonial modernitet och litterärt berättande2016In: Historiens hemvist. 1, Den historiska tidens former / [ed] Victoria Fareld, Hans Ruin, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2016, p. 191-214Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    District 9: a roundtable2010In: Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Comparative Studies, ISSN 1753-3171, E-ISSN 1543-1304, Vol. 11, no 1-2, p. 172-175Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Därför lyckas romanen fånga historiens djup: recension av Pramoedya Ananta Toer2011In: Dagens NyheterArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Exit: Endings and New Beginnings in Literature and Life2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Fields in Formation: English Studies and National Literature in South Africa (with a Brazilian Comparison)2016In: Bourdieu and Postcolonial Studies / [ed] Raphael Dalleo, Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2016, p. 159-174Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    How Writing Becomes (World) Literature: Singularity, the Universalizable, and the Implied Writer2016In: Institutions of World Literature: Writing, Translation, Markets / [ed] Stefan Helgesson, Pieter Vermeulen, New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 23-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Johannesburg Sighted: TJ/Double Negative and the Temporality of the Image/Text2015In: Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Comparative Studies, ISSN 1753-3171, E-ISSN 1543-1304, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 51-63Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    João Paulo Borges Coelho, João Albasini and the Worlding of Mozambican Literature2013In: 1616: Anuario de literatura comparada, ISSN 0210-7287, Vol. 3, p. 91-106Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In O Olho de Hertzog (2010), set in the immediate aftermath ofthe First World War, the Mozambican writer João Paulo Borges Coelho presentsa cosmopolitan panorama of colonial south-eastern Africa. «Mozambique» emergeshere not primarily as a Portuguese colonial space but as a site of multipleentanglements between interests: transnational and local, European and African,South African and Mozambican, British and German, colonial and proto-nationalist.In such a way, and differently from previous Mozambican literature, O Olhode Hertzog performs a complex act of worlding that exceeds the bounded colonial/national space of Mozambique, but resists synthesis. This cosmopolitanismcan be read expressive of the strained relations and constitutive hierarchies ofcolonial society as well as, by implication, of contemporary globalisation. Themost important index of such a critical cosmopolitanism is the trope of the «twoworlds» of Lourenço Marques, embodied in the central character João Albasini,legendary mestiço activist and founder of the proto-nationalist journal O BradoAfricano (1918-1974). Albasini functions as a Virgil for the protagonist HansMahrenholz’s descent into the colonial inferno of Mozambique. Not least byciting documentary material –Albasini’s editorials and shop signs in LourençoMarques– Coelho problematises the divisions of the colonial city, sustained byinternational capital, and provides a sharp contrast to the otherwise dominant«European» narrative of novel, which revolves around a fabled diamond andwhite South African intrigue.

  • 13.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Literary hybrids and the circuits of translation: the example of Mia Couto2010In: Cultural expression, creativity and innovation / [ed] Helmut K. Anheier and Yudhishtir Raj Isar, London: Sage , 2010, p. 215-224Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Literary Language and the Translated Self of Assia Djebar2013In: Transcultural Identities in Contemporary Literature / [ed] Irene Gilsena Nordin, Julie Hansen, Carmen Zamorano Llena, Amsterdam/New York: Rodopi, 2013, p. 203-222Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    “Literature,” Theory from the South and the Case of the São Paulo School2018In: Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry, ISSN 2052-2614, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 141-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With methodological support in Reinhart Koselleck’s notion of historical semantics, and an empirical focus on the Brazilian critic Antonio Candido (1918−2017), this article approaches “literature” as a layered concept that will always fail to function as that “plane of equivalence” that Aamir Mufti sees as an outcome of the Orientalist episteme. This failure is historical in the strongest sense; it derives from the condition that “history is never identical with its linguistic registration,” as Koselleck puts it. A concept will therefore, throughout its life span, always encompass a combination of persisting and new meanings. In this way, Candido and the São Paulo school of criticism that he was instrumental in forming can be read as a strong instance of “theory from the South” that exploits the malleability of the concept from within its historical situatedness and contributes thereby to the conceptual worlding of literature.

  • 16.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Litteraturvetenskapen och det kosmopolitiska begäret2013In: Tidskrift för litteraturvetenskap, ISSN 1104-0556, E-ISSN 2001-094X, no 1, p. 81-93Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mia Couto and Translation2016In: A Companion to Mia Couto / [ed] Grant Hamilton, David Huddart, Woodbridge: James Currey Publishers, 2016, p. 140-156Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    "Minor Disorders": Ivan Vladislavic and the devolution of South African English2011In: Marginal spaces: reading Ivan Vladislavic / [ed] Gerald Gaylard, Johannesburg: Wits University Press , 2011, p. 175-191Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Mocambique berättar: Kärlekens ärr : sexton noveller2010Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Ngugi wa Thiong'o and the Conceptual Worlding of Literature2017In: Anglia. Zeitschrift für englische Philologie, ISSN 0340-5222, E-ISSN 1865-8938, Vol. 135, no 1, p. 105-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The central claim of this article is that the Kenyan writer Ngugi wa Thiong'o, known above all for his advocacy of African-language writing, performs in his essays a conceptual worlding of literature that serves to diversify its semantic content and thereby enable the recognition and expanded production of otherwise marginalised literatures. The logic of this conceptual worlding is read through a cosmopolitan-vernacular optic, which presupposes that Ngugi's interventions can neither be defined as ethnically particularist nor as expansively cosmopolitan. Rather, his approach 1) combines multiple literary 'ecologies', in Alex Beecroft's sense, and 2) attempts to reroute the temporality of 'literature' so that it is no longer reducible to Eurochronology. What unites these interventions is that they both draw on and attempt to recalibrate 'world literature' as a symbolic value in response to a postcolonial predicament. Three texts provide the empirical focus of the article: the department circular "On the Abolition of the English Department" that Ngugi co-authored in 1968 with Taban Lo Liyong and Henry Owuor-Anyumba; the essay "Literature and Society", first written in 1973; and "Memory, Restoration and African Renaissance", which is the third chapter in Something Torn and New from 2009.

  • 21.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Pessoa, Anon, and the Natal Colony: Retracing an Imperial Matrix2015In: Portuguese Literary & Cultural Studies, ISSN 1521-804X, Vol. 28, p. 30-46Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Post-anticolonialism2017In: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America, ISSN 0030-8129, E-ISSN 1938-1530, Vol. 132, no 1, p. 164-170Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Postcolonialism and world literature: Rethinking the boundaries2014In: Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, ISSN 1369-801X, E-ISSN 1469-929X, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 483-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The disciplinary fields of postcolonialism and world literature are currently engaged in some sharp exchanges over the global study of literature. With Mia Couto and Assia Djebar as its test cases, this article assesses and expands the debate. While postcolonial and world literature scholars clearly have some common ground, misunderstandings as well as disagreements prevail. More importantly, however, there are evident disciplinary blind spots on both sides that call for a combination of methodologies to account for literature as grounded in local, conflictual histories and as a circulational phenomenon that moves across languages and literary fields. Insofar as literature is a globally transportable institution, it cannot be understood exclusively in terms of political power and domination, but also as a world of its own and an enabling alternative to other domains of power. Conversely, the article argues, given the tensions between their subjective position and the transnational valency of literature, writers from colonies and postcolonies are of specific and paradigmatic importance to the theorization of world literature.

  • 24.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Pramoedya Ananta Toer: "Fotspår"2010In: Dagens NyheterArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Radicalizing Temporal Difference: Anthropology, Postoclonial Theory, and Literary Time2014In: History and Theory, ISSN 0018-2656, E-ISSN 1468-2303, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 545-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an attempt to address on a theoretical level an antinomy in postcolonialapproaches to the question of temporal difference. Current scholarship tends bothto denounce the way in which the others of the Western self are placed notionally inanother time than the West and not only analytically affirm but indeed valorize multipletemporalities. I elaborate on the two problematic temporal frameworks—linear developmentalismand cultural relativism—that belong to a colonial legacy and generate theantinomy in question, and then proceed to discuss possible alternatives provided by aKoselleck-inspired approach to historical time as inherently plural. I thereby make twocentral claims: (1) postcolonial conceptions of multiple temporalities typically, if tacitly,associate time with culture, and hence risk reproducing the aporias of cultural relativism;(2) postcolonial metahistorical critique is commonly premised on a simplified and evenmonolithic understanding of Western modernity as an ideology of “linear progress.”Ultimately, I suggest that the solution lies in radicalizing, not discarding, the notion ofmultiple temporalities. Drawing on the Brazilian classic Os sertões as my key example,I also maintain that literary writing exhibits a unique “heterochronic” (in analogy with“heteroglossic”) potential, enabling a more refined understanding of temporal difference.

  • 26.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    "Ras" och ethos2014In: Retorisk kritik: Teori och metod i retorisk analys / [ed] Otto Fischer, Patrik Mehrens och Jon Viklund, Retorikförlaget, 2014, p. 275-286Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Recension av "Benjamin Moser, Why This World: a biography of Clarice Lispector"2010In: Dagens NyheterArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Richard Dowden: "Afrika : framtidens kontinent"2010In: Dagens NyheterArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Sugar Man and Anglo-Sweden2013In: Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Comparative Studies, ISSN 1753-3171, E-ISSN 1543-1304, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 481-484Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Tayeb Salih, Sol Plaatje and the Trajectories of World Literature2015In: The Cambridge Journal of Postcolonial Literary Inquiry, ISSN 2052-2614, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 253-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A crucial theoretical question in world literature studies concerns the dual trajectories of extroversion and introversion, and how they relate to or even are predicated on each other. By discussing the examples of Tayeb Salih and, in particular, Sol Plaatje, this article tries to demonstrate that although the current turn towardmore “introverted” literary studies can be seen as justifiably critical of single-system modes of world literature theory, an attentiveness to the combined and contradictory trajectories of extroversion and introversion will enable a more situated and localized form of world literature studies that nonetheless evades the risk of reifying nationalor linguistic provenance. This also requires a stronger conception of reception history not as a transparent vessel for the literary object, but as an active agent in rendering specific texts or authorships readable as introverted or extroverted.

  • 31.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The changing history of African literature2009In: The changing face of African literature / [ed] Bernard de Meyer and Neil ten Kortenaar, Amsterdam: Rodopi , 2009, p. 27-41Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Event of Postcolonial Shame2012In: Perspectives: studies in translatology, ISSN 0907-676X, E-ISSN 1747-6623, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 289-291Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The Rose of Rhodesia as colonial romance2009In: Screening the past, ISSN 1328-9756, no 25Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The World-Literary formation of Antonio Candido2018In: Re-mapping World Literature: Writing, Book Markets and Epistemologies between Latin America and the Global South / [ed] Gesine Müller, Jorge J. Locane, Benjamin Loy, Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter, 2018, p. 225-236Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Transnationalism in southern African literature: modernists, realists, and the inequality of print culture2008Book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Unsettling Fictions: Generic Instability and Colonial Time2014In: True Lies Worldwide: Fictionality in Global Contexts, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 2014, p. 261-274Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Uys Krige and the South African Afterlife of Fernando Pessoa2015In: Pessoa Plural, ISSN 2212-4179, no 8, p. 265-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three letters to Hubert Jennings—two of them from the Afrikaans poet Uys Krige, one from the French poet Armand Guibert—prompt a reconsideration of the South African reception of Fernando Pessoa. Although this reception was and is clearly limited, Krige emerges here as a key individual connecting Jennings, Guibert, Roy Campbell and—by extension—Fernando Pessoa in a transnational literary network structured according to the logic of what Pascale Casonova has called “the world republic of letters” (La République Mondiale des Lettres). As such, however, this historical network has limited purchase on the contemporary concerns of South African literature. The letters alert us, thereby, not just to the inherent transnationalism of South African literature, but also to largely forgotten and, to some extent, compromised aspects of South African literary history.

  • 38.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Världens mest världsvana litteratur2010In: Dagens NyheterArticle, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Än hörs ekot av Gud: Ola Sigurdson, "Det postsekulära tillståndet"2009In: Dagens NyheterArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Ödemarkens språk: Euclides da Cunha, João Guimarães Rosa och översättningens resa2013In: Resor i tid och rum: festskrift till Margareta Petersson / [ed] Årheim, Annette, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2013, p. 154-165Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Alvstad, CeciliaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, The Institute for Interpretation and Translation Studies.Watson, DavidEngelska institutionen, Uppsala universitet.
    Literature, geography, translation: studies in world writing2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Vermeulen, Pieter
    Institutions of World Literature: Writing, Translation, Markets2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Helgesson, Stefan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Vermeulen, Pieter
    Introduction: World Literature in the Making2015In: Institutions of World Literature: Writing, Translation, Markets / [ed] Stefan Helgesson, Pieter Vermeulen, London: Routledge, 2015, p. 1-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
1 - 43 of 43
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