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  • 1.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.
    Crazy for Wisdom: The Making of a Mad Yogin in Fifteenth-Century Tibet2012Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In his early twenties, the Tibetan monk Sangyé Gyaltsen (1452–1507) left his monastery to become a wandering tantric yogin. As he moved from place to place, seeking enlightenment beyond the bounds of monasticism, his behavior became increasingly erratic. While some were shocked or even angered by his actions, others were drawn to him. Sangyé Gyaltsen’s followers described his transgressive behaviors as enlightened action, rooted in authoritative Buddhist scripture. Using biographical sources, Stefan Larsson explores Sangyé Gyaltsen’s transformation into the charismatic ‘Madman of Tsang,’ Tsangnyön Heruka.

     

    Best known today as the author of the Life of Milarepa, Tsangnyön Heruka was one of the most influential mad yogins of Tibet. His biography brings its reader face-to-face with an unexpected aspect of Buddhist practice that flourished in fifteenth-century Tibet.

  • 2.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.
    Gendyn Tjöpel: en kontroversiell fritänkare i 1900-talets Tibet2000In: Orientaliska Studier, ISSN 0345-8997, no 103–104, p. 13-37Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.
    Outside of the Monastery Walls: How Buddhist Songs and Biographies were used to Promote Alternative Forms of Practice and Non-Monastic Ideals in Sixteenth-Century Tibet2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although Tibetan Buddhism is often associated with monks and canonical texts, other types of Buddhist practitioners and texts arealso important. Before the Fifth Dalai Lama came to power and Tibetan Buddhism became systematized, charismatic yoginscomposed and printed songs and biographies to promote a non-monastic ideal with remarkable success. Modeling their lifestyleupon Indian tantric siddhas and the 11th century Tibetan yogin Milarepa, whose tradition they followed and propagated, theyattempted to reform Tibetan Buddhism. Taking as a point of departure four texts which were printed in Southern Tibet in the earlysixteenth-century by a group of such yogins, this project will investigate how Buddhist songs and biographies were codified into adistinct genre in Tibet. By combining a traditional philological and historical approach with theories concerning the interaction betweenlife and texts, the history, function, and contents of these songs and biographies will be explored. Moreover, the people who collectedand printed the texts will be portrayed. The texts upon which the project focuses have never been translated, and the historical periodwhen they were produced has generally been neglected in contemporary scholarship. By scrutinizing this unique body of material,the project will contribute with important basic research. The project will also break new ground in unfolding the complicated web ofinterfaces between lives and texts, and in the textual corpus.

  • 4.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.
    Prints about the Printer: Four Early Prints in Honour of the Mad Yogin of gTsang2016In: Tibetan Printing: Comparison, Continuities, and Change / [ed] Hildegard Diemberger, Franz-Karl Ehrhard, Peter Kornick, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2016, p. 309-331Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.
    Reflektioner över skolboks-buddhism: Bilder av den tibetanska buddhismen2005In: Chakra: tidskrift för indiska religioner, ISSN 1652-0203, no 3, p. 178-182Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.
    Review of 'Vision and Violence: Lama Zhang andthe Politics of Charisma in Twelfth-Century Tibet' by Carl S. Yamamoto2014In: Himalaya, ISSN 1935-2212, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 143-144Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.
    The Learned Monk and the Mad Yogi2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although Tibetan Buddhism is often associated with monks and canonical texts, other types of Buddhist practitioners and texts arealso important. Before the Fifth Dalai Lama came to power and Tibetan Buddhism became systematized, charismatic yoginscomposed and printed songs and biographies to promote a non-monastic ideal with remarkable success. Modeling their lifestyleupon Indian tantric siddhas and the 11th century Tibetan yogin Milarepa, whose tradition they followed and propagated, theyattempted to reform Tibetan Buddhism. Taking as a point of departure four texts which were printed in Southern Tibet in the earlysixteenth-century by a group of such yogins, this project will investigate how Buddhist songs and biographies were codified into adistinct genre in Tibet. By combining a traditional philological and historical approach with theories concerning the interaction betweenlife and texts, the history, function, and contents of these songs and biographies will be explored. Moreover, the people who collectedand printed the texts will be portrayed. The texts upon which the project focuses have never been translated, and the historical periodwhen they were produced has generally been neglected in contemporary scholarship. By scrutinizing this unique body of material,the project will contribute with important basic research. The project will also break new ground in unfolding the complicated web ofinterfaces between lives and texts, and in the textual corpus.

  • 8.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.
    The Life and Songs of a Mad Yogin2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tsangnyön Heruka (1452-1507) was an important but nowadays largely forgotten Tibetan yogin. Because of the deliberate madnessthat he engaged in he became known as a "mad yogin". His message is particularly clearly formulated in a collection of songs,attributed to Tsangnyön and compiled by his closest disciples after he passed away. These songs provide us with a unique insightinto the peculiar form of Buddhism that Tsangnyön and his disciples advocated and practised. By looking at the narrative context ofthe songs it is sometimes possible to discern why, when, and where the songs were sung. By also studying the other texts written byTsangnyön and his disciples (i.e. the so-called "School of Tsangnyön") it is possible to obtain a rather precise picture of thisinteresting "alternative" form of Tibetan Buddhism. A study of this unique body of material provides us with much insight into a littleknown historical period, a social milieu, Esoteric Buddhism, and into the network of disciples and patrons around Tsangnyön. Thuswe may gain specific information about this important and influential movement that nowadays is mainly accessible to us indirectly,by means of the hagiographies and songs, attributed to early Kagyu masters such as Milarepa and Marpa that Tsangnyön and hisdisciples compiled and printed. The creators of these texts (i.e. Tsangnyön and his disciples) have so far remained obscure andunknown. This research project aims at changing this situation.

  • 9.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.
    The Literary Works of gTsang smyon Heruka (1452–1507)2013In: Proceedings of the Seventh Nordic Tibet Research Conference Helsinki 2009 / [ed] Thubten K. Rikey, Erika Sandman, Riika J. Virtanen, Helsinki: The Society of Himalayan Studies in Finland , 2013, p. 69-87Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.
    The Mad Heruka from gTsang: Madness in a Buddhist Perspective2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.
    The Social Status of the Wandering yogi2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although Tibetan Buddhism is often associated with monks and canonical texts, other types of Buddhist practitioners and texts arealso important. Before the Fifth Dalai Lama came to power and Tibetan Buddhism became systematized, charismatic yoginscomposed and printed songs and biographies to promote a non-monastic ideal with remarkable success. Modeling their lifestyleupon Indian tantric siddhas and the 11th century Tibetan yogin Milarepa, whose tradition they followed and propagated, theyattempted to reform Tibetan Buddhism. Taking as a point of departure four texts which were printed in Southern Tibet in the earlysixteenth-century by a group of such yogins, this project will investigate how Buddhist songs and biographies were codified into adistinct genre in Tibet. By combining a traditional philological and historical approach with theories concerning the interaction betweenlife and texts, the history, function, and contents of these songs and biographies will be explored. Moreover, the people who collectedand printed the texts will be portrayed. The texts upon which the project focuses have never been translated, and the historical periodwhen they were produced has generally been neglected in contemporary scholarship. By scrutinizing this unique body of material,the project will contribute with important basic research. The project will also break new ground in unfolding the complicated web ofinterfaces between lives and texts, and in the textual corpus.

  • 12.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.
    The Songs of gTsang smyon Heruka2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tsangnyön Heruka (1452-1507) was an important but nowadays largely forgotten Tibetan yogin. Because of the deliberate madnessthat he engaged in he became known as a "mad yogin". His message is particularly clearly formulated in a collection of songs,attributed to Tsangnyön and compiled by his closest disciples after he passed away. These songs provide us with a unique insightinto the peculiar form of Buddhism that Tsangnyön and his disciples advocated and practised. By looking at the narrative context ofthe songs it is sometimes possible to discern why, when, and where the songs were sung. By also studying the other texts written byTsangnyön and his disciples (i.e. the so-called "School of Tsangnyön") it is possible to obtain a rather precise picture of thisinteresting "alternative" form of Tibetan Buddhism. A study of this unique body of material provides us with much insight into a littleknown historical period, a social milieu, Esoteric Buddhism, and into the network of disciples and patrons around Tsangnyön. Thuswe may gain specific information about this important and influential movement that nowadays is mainly accessible to us indirectly,by means of the hagiographies and songs, attributed to early Kagyu masters such as Milarepa and Marpa that Tsangnyön and hisdisciples compiled and printed. The creators of these texts (i.e. Tsangnyön and his disciples) have so far remained obscure andunknown. This research project aims at changing this situation.

  • 13.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.
    Tsangnjön Heruka och andra ’galningar’ i den tibetanska buddhismen2005Other (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.
    Tsangnyön Heruka’s Sixteenth-Century Renovation of the Svayambhu St­upa2011In: Light of the Valley: Renewing the Sacred Art and Traditions of Svayambhu / [ed] Tsering Palmo Gellek and Padma Dorje Maitland, Berkeley: Dharma Publishing , 2011, p. 208-230Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Tsangnyön Heruka (1452-1507) was an important but nowadays largely forgotten Tibetan yogin. Because of the deliberate madnessthat he engaged in he became known as a "mad yogin". His message is particularly clearly formulated in a collection of songs,attributed to Tsangnyön and compiled by his closest disciples after he passed away. These songs provide us with a unique insightinto the peculiar form of Buddhism that Tsangnyön and his disciples advocated and practised. By looking at the narrative context ofthe songs it is sometimes possible to discern why, when, and where the songs were sung. By also studying the other texts written byTsangnyön and his disciples (i.e. the so-called "School of Tsangnyön") it is possible to obtain a rather precise picture of thisinteresting "alternative" form of Tibetan Buddhism. A study of this unique body of material provides us with much insight into a littleknown historical period, a social milieu, Esoteric Buddhism, and into the network of disciples and patrons around Tsangnyön. Thuswe may gain specific information about this important and influential movement that nowadays is mainly accessible to us indirectly,by means of the hagiographies and songs, attributed to early Kagyu masters such as Milarepa and Marpa that Tsangnyön and hisdisciples compiled and printed. The creators of these texts (i.e. Tsangnyön and his disciples) have so far remained obscure andunknown. This research project aims at changing this situation.

  • 15.
    Larsson, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, History of Religions.
    What Do the Childhood and Early Life of gTsang smyon Heruka Tell Us About His Bka’ brgyud Affiliation?2011In: Mahāmudrā and the Bka’-brgyud Tradition: / [ed] Roger R. Jackson and Matthew Kapstein, Halle (Saale): International Institute for Tibetan and Buddhist Studies , 2011, p. 425-452Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Larsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies.
    Quintman, Andrew
    Opening the Eyes of Faith: Constructing Tradition in a Sixteenth-Century Catalogue of Tibetan Religious Poetry2015In: Revue d'Etudes Tibétaines, ISSN 1768-2959, E-ISSN 1768-2959, no 32, p. 87-151Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 16 of 16
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  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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