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  • 1.
    Bock, Zannie
    et al.
    University of West Cape, South Africa.
    Dalwai, Nausheena
    University of West Cape, South Africa.
    Stroud, Christopher
    University of West Cape, South Africa.
    Cool mobilities: Youth style and mobile telephony in contemporary South Africa2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Considerable research on social media has documented the diversity and creativity inherent in many youth texting styles and instant messaging. However, little scholarship has explored the impact of changing technologies on texting styles, nor how the materiality of the phone is a stylistic resource in itself. This paper aims to address these gaps by exploring the role of phone, affordance, and application in the texting styles of young students over a five year period at a higher education institution in South Africa. Central to our account is a view of style as an ‘assemblage of design choices’ (Coupland 2007). We argue that our conception of style needs to be expanded to take into account  both the materiality of the phone as artefact, as well as users’ interpersonal affect and subjectivity. We use our analysis to make the argument that the changing technologies and their associated affordances provide new resources for styling identity among our participants, and that what shapes the selection and combination of both linguistic features of texting as well as choice of mobile technologies is a fluid and complex interplay of factors, driven by the participant’s changing identities and ideologies as well as an appreciation of what is symbolically valued and socially ‘cool’.

  • 2.
    Chimbutane, Feliciano
    et al.
    Eduardo Mondlane University, Moçambique.
    Stroud, ChristopherStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Educação Bilingue em Moçambique: Reflectindo Criticamente sobre Políticas e Práticas2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Eliaso Magnusson, Josefina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    High proficiency in markets of performance a sociocultural approach to nativelikeness2012In: Studies in Second Language Acquisition, ISSN 0272-2631, E-ISSN 1470-1545, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 321-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-proficiency second language (L2) learners challenge much theory and methodology in contemporary sociolinguistic and L2 acquisition research, which suggests the need for honest interdisciplinarity when working in the interstices of style, stylization, and advanced acquisition processes. When to consider fluent and highly competent speakers of a language to be language learners in ways relevant to SLA theory is a fraught and contentious issue. This study suggests that highly fluent multilinguals provide key data on notions of nativelikeness and near-nativelikeness that are of value for understanding processes of acquisition and use. It suggests that relative judgments of nativelikeness are interactionally accomplished (membership) categorizations made on the basis of specific linguistic features relative to particular linguistic markets. The data for the study are taken from a unique population-namely, young people from multilingual family backgrounds, born and raised in Sweden, all of whom ethnically self-identify as Assyrian-Syrian but whose repertoires are complexly multilingual. All participants are generally perceived to be native speakers of Swedish on a daily basis. Nevertheless, at certain moments, these young people are reclassified as near-native or native-like. The study analyzes their narrative accounts of metalinguistic reflexivity from occasions and interactional moments when they are classified as nonstandard speakers and, therefore, near-natives or learners. The findings suggest the necessity of revisiting notions of nativelikeness and account for the phenomenon in terms of register, voice, and identity relative to different symbolic and linguistic markets.

  • 4.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    At the nexus of vulnerability: Multilingualism in development2016Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The majority of the world’s nations are multilingual, although many of the languages spoken have little or no official recognition in the conduct of everyday affairs of State, nor do they figure in any major way in development discourses. For example, although UNESCO and other World and regional organizations frequently underscore the desirability and importance of multilingualism, it is often in the context of education and cultural heritage rather than development more generally. Lack of recognition, however, does not mean that multilingualism does not play an essential role in the public and private lives of citizens. In this short text, we hope to drive home the point that local linguistic resources also directly bear upon democracy, economy, and health. And this is not just by proxy through the known beneficial effects of educating in local languages. We will suggest that more attention be paid to the various ways in which development can benefit from the use of local multilingualisms. Language is important in development precisely because it is at the nexus of vulnerability. Poverty stricken groups in developing contexts are not only the least resourced. They • are also the least visible • lack political and cultural recognition on official arenas • frequently suffer stigma and ambivalence with respect to their cultural heritage • have a paucity of educational capital • experience poor health. One major factor contributing to this cycle of vulnerability – and for which solutions are within easy reach – is that the linguistic and cultural systems these groups have ready access to are not officially recognized. Non-recognition of the languages in which groups organize their everyday life and socialize their children means that they are denied the tools to make their voices heard or to find empowerment through political agency. They also have few opportunities to influence their day-to-day material conditions. The ultimate consequence of this situation is extreme vulnerability to political, economic and ecological (including health) developments. In this document, we shall argue, by way of illustration, that issues of language in general and multilingualism specifically need to be seen as core facets of such diverse areas as democracy, economy, health, and education.

  • 5.
    Kulick, Don
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Christianity, cargo and ideas of self: Patterns of literacy in a Papua New Guinean village1990In: Man, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 286-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Literacy in a small, rural, newly literate Papua New Guinean village is analysed by placing it in the context of local notions of Christianity, the self and language. Villagers' interpretations of the relationship between Catholicism and the written word are based on their Cargo-oriented world-view and on their pre-Christian beliefs about language as a powerful means by which individuals could bring about transformations in their world. Local ideas of the self and others are articulated and reinforced through an emphasis on particular dimensions of oral language use. This emphasis has consequences for the uses to which literacy is put, the structure of the writing the villagers produce, and the ways in which they attribute meaning to written texts.

     

  • 6. Luphondo, Nobuhle
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Deconstructing gender and sexuality discourses in "Brothers for Life": A critical look at chronotopes of consumption in HIV/AIDS prevention campaigns2012In: Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics Plus, ISSN 2224-3380, Vol. 41, p. 41-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite batteries of interventions to change the dynamics of HIV in South African communities, increasing HIV prevalence suggests that much more needs to be done to stem the tides of infection. Specifically issues of language and communication around HIV/AIDS merit more attention. One aspect of the efficacy of HIV/AIDS discourses is the question of what extent they may serve to (inadvertently) reproduce sexual practices and mores inimical to HIV/AIDS prevention. This paper conducts a chronotopic and multimodal analysis of a popular South African campaign "Brothers for Life" from this perspective. The campaign is an attempt to promote 'new' role models for South African men in order to get to grips with one of the most serious factors behind the spread of HIV/AIDS, namely male violence against women and children. The analysis suggests that past ideals of masculinity continue to find resonance in masculinities of the present, although framed, mediated and reindexicalized in late modern discourses of consumerism. Thus foundational assumptions on figurations of masculinity and male sexuality appear to remain largely consistent across generations.

  • 7. Luphondo, Nobuhle
    et al.
    Stroud, Christpher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Introduction: (Super) Diversities & HIV/AIDS: Multilingualism in Multiple Modalities2012In: Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics Plus, ISSN 2224-3380, Vol. 41, p. i-viiArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 8. Milani, Tommaso
    et al.
    Williams, Quentin
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Editorial: Space/Place Matters2017In: Multilingual Margins, ISSN 2221-4216, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 2-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9. Peck, Amiena
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa.
    Skinscapes2015In: Linguistic Landscape, ISSN 2214-9953, E-ISSN 2214-9961, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 133-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper argues for extending linguistic landscape studies to also encompass the body as a corporeal landscape, or ‘moving discursive locality’. We articulate this point within a narrative of a developing field of landscape studies that is increasingly attentive to the mobility and materiality of spatialized semiotics as performative, that is, as partially determining of how we come to understand ourselves ‘in place’. Taking Cape Town’s tattooing culture as an illustration, we unpack the idea of ‘the human subject as an entrepreneur of the self, as author of his or her being in the world’ (Comaroff & Comaroff, 2012: 23), by using a phenomenological methodology to explore the materiality of the body as a mobile and dynamic space of inscribed spatialized identities and historical power relations. Specifically, we focus on: how tattooed bodies sculpt future selves and imagined spaces, the imprint they leave behind in the lives of five participants in the study and ultimately the creation of bodies that matter in time and place. The paper will conclude with a discussion of what studies of corporeal landscapes may contribute to a broader field of linguistic landscape studies.

  • 10. Prinsloo, Mastin
    et al.
    Stroud, ChristopherUniversity of Western Cape, South Africa.
    Educating for language and literacy diversity: Mobile selves2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 11. Prinsloo, Mastin
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    University of Western Cape, South Africa.
    Introduction2014In: Educating for language and literacy diversity: Moving selves / [ed] Mastin Prinsloo, Christopher Stroud, Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, p. 1-19Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12. Shaikjee, Mooniq
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Fanon in drag: Decoloniality in sociolinguistics?2017In: Journal of Sociolinguistics, ISSN 1360-6441, E-ISSN 1467-9841, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 371-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In focus in this paper is the genre of drag, and the uses to which it is put by its proponents in subverting conventional and repressive (Western) models of gender, sexuality and race. We raise the question of to what extent performances of drag, while arguably disrupting gender stereotypes, nevertheless continue to reproduce colonialities of race and sexuality. Framing an analysis of a drag king performance in a sociolinguistics of subjectification inspired by the work of Frantz Fanon, we offer an account that recognizes how, rather than subverting or challenging conventional images of gender, the performance is one part of a complex circulation of textual and corporeal semiotics that enregisters racialized categories of male and female cut to the cloth of coloniality/modernity. On the other hand, the analysis also reveals that there are moments of interruption and slippage in the reproduction of colonial constructs of race, gender and sexuality that may offer more complex and multifarious understandings of what may comprise the exercises of decoloniality. We conclude with a discussion of what a decolonial Fanonian approach to subjectification might offer sociolinguistics.

  • 13. Shaikjee, Mooniq
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Fanon in drag: Decoloniality in sociolinguistics?2017In: Journal of Sociolinguistics, ISSN 1360-6441, E-ISSN 1467-9841, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 371-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In focus in this paper is the genre of drag, and the uses to which it is put by its proponents in subverting conventional and repressive (Western) models of gender, sexuality and race. We raise the question of to what extent performances of drag, while arguably disrupting gender stereotypes, nevertheless continue to reproduce colonialities of race and sexuality. Framing an analysis of a drag king performance in a sociolinguistics of subjectification inspired by the work of Frantz Fanon, we offer an account that recognizes how, rather than subverting or challenging conventional images of gender, the performance is one part of a complex circulation of textual and corporeal semiotics that enregisters racialized categories of male and female cut to the cloth of coloniality/modernity. On the other hand, the analysis also reveals that there are moments of interruption and slippage in the reproduction of colonial constructs of race, gender and sexuality that may offer more complex and multifarious understandings of what may comprise the exercises of decoloniality. We conclude with a discussion of what a decolonial Fanonian approach to subjectification might offer sociolinguistics.

  • 14.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    A postliberal critique of language rights: Toward a politics of language for a linguistics of contact2009In: International perspectives on bilingual education: Policy, practice and controversy / [ed] Petrovic, J., London: Information Age Publishing , 2009, p. 191-218Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    A postscript on the postracial2017In: Entangled Discourses: South-North Orders of Visibility / [ed] Caroline Kerfoot, Kenneth Hyltenstam, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 230-238Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    African modernity, transnationalism, and language vitality: portuguese in multilingual Mozambique2008In: Globalization and language vitality: perspectives from black Africa / [ed] Cécile Vigouroux, Salikoko S. Mufwene, London: Continuum, 2008, p. 70-96Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Afterword2014In: Global Portuguese: Linguistic Ideologies in Late Modernity / [ed] Moita-Lopes, Luiz Paulo, London: Routledge, 2014, 1, p. 222-230Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Afterword: Turbulent deflections2015In: Language, Literacy and Diversity: Moving Words / [ed] Christopher Stroud, Mastin Prinsloo, New York: Routledge, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Bilingualism: colonialism, postcolonialism and high modernity2007In: Bilingualism:: a social approach, Palgrave Macmillan, New York , 2007, p. 25-49Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Halvspråkighet och rinkebysvenska som språkideologiska begrepp2013In: Svenska som andraspråk: i forskning, undervisning och samhälle / [ed] Hyltenstam, Kenneth & Lindberg, Inger, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 2. uppl., p. 313-342Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Princípios de emboderamento através da Educação Multilingue2012In: Educação Bilingue em Moçambique: Reflectindo Criticamente sobre Políticas e Práticas / [ed] Chimbutane, F. & Stroud, C., Maputo, Moçambique: Texto Editores , 2012, p. 221-248Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Rescaling Mozambique: Implications for the differentiation and distribution of popular practices of Portuguese2008In: Veredas: Revista da Associação internacional de Lusitanistas, Vol. 9, p. 137-154Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Response to Blommaert: Language, asylum and the national order2009In: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 434-435Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    The problem of intention and meaning in code-switching1992In: Text - an interdisciplinary journal for the study of discourse, ISSN 0165-4888, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 127-155Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Towards a postliberal theory of citizenship2009In: International perspectives on bilingual education: Policy, practice and controversy / [ed] Petrovic, John, New York: Information Age Publishing , 2009, p. 191-218Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Guissemo, Manuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Eduardo Mondlane University, Mozambique.
    Linguistic Messianism: Multilingualism in Mozambique2017In: Sociolinguistics in African Context: Perspectives and Challenges / [ed] Augustin Emmanuel Ebongue, Ellen Hurst, Springer, 2017, p. 35-51Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on the idea that in Mozambique, multilingualism, commonly understood as the co-existence and juxtaposition of more than one language, is one mechanism whereby essential features of colonial social logics are reconfigured in contemporary ‘postcolonial’ societies. They interrogate how multilingualism, whilst ostensibly promising a trope for linguistic (and cultural) diversity, is best seen, in common with other forms of neoliberal governance, as a response to ‘the effects of anti and postcolonial movements in the liberal world’. They conclude that this constancy is not accidental, but a key dimension of how multilingualism as a particular political regime of language organization has been used historically and in contemporary time as a technology of liberal governance. The paper highlights the meaning, the significance and the indexical values that African languages have vis a vis Portuguese, in a context where African languages are subordinated.

  • 27.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Jegels, Dimitri
    University of the Western Cape.
    Semiotic landscapes and mobile narrations of place: Performing the local2014In: International Journal of the Sociology of Language, ISSN 0165-2516, E-ISSN 1613-3668, Vol. 228, p. 179-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we explore some of the practices and mechanisms behind the multiple constructions of place and its meanings, focusing specifically on the diverse ways in which signage is read and incorporated into personal narratives of place. We employ a methodology of narrated walking that allows insights into how our informants actively construct the significance of local place as they navigate and move through space, and that also illustrates how signage discourses are enacted, performed, disputed and elaborated in local performativities of place. The article concludes by drawing out some implications for research on semiotic landscapes generally, and offers some suggestions on what such an approach to semiotic landscapes might contribute to a politics of local civility by taking into consideration how signage mediates local interpersonal relationships, the situated social dynamics of multivocality and, ultimately, the contesting lives of multiple publics.

  • 28.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Towards rethinking multilingualism and language policy for academic literacies2013In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 396-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The language policy of the University of the Western Cape (2003) reflects the temperedtraces of historically and politically charged negotiations. We argue that a reinterpreta-tion of ‘policy failure’ as responsive engagement with complex new forms of linguisticand social diversity can lead to a critical rethinking of the nature of multilingualism andlanguage policy in a South African tertiary education sector in transformation. We submitthat university language policies need to consider (a) how the complex linguistic and non-linguistic repertoires of students can be mobilised for transformative discipline-specificcurricula and pedagogies, and (b) the concept of multilingualism both as a resource anda transformative epistemology and methodology of diversity. We suggest a policy devel-opment process that moves from micro-interaction to macro-structure, tracing processesof resemiotisation, interrogating legitimised representational conventions, and reshapinginstitutional practices and perceptions. We discuss the implications for register formationand for broader epistemological access and ownership.

  • 29.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Mpendukana, Sibonele
    University of Western Cape.
    Multilingual signage: A multimodal approach to discourses of consumption in a South African township2010In: Social Semiotics, ISSN 1035-0330, E-ISSN 1470-1219, Vol. 5, p. 469-493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper explores how global commercial discourses and the politics of aspiration in post-apartheid South Africa may be seen as contributing to the restructuring of spaces of multilingualism and the refiguring of indexical values of English and South African languages. The analysis takes its point of departure in how late-modern lifestyles, identities, aspirations and imaginations are represented across local and transnational commercial signage in the Western Cape township of Khayelitsha, focusing in particular on how different languages are multimodally constituted and differentially represented in two different sub-genres of commercial billboards. We suggest that new late-modern multimodal representations of identity, and the way multilingual resources are configured into new repertoires and genres of subjectivity, may be one important factor in how social transformation is mediated in changing perceptions and practices of language, while simultaneously and paradoxically reinforcing traditional conceptions of cultural authenticity and self-representation.

  • 30.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Mpendukana, Sibunile
    University of the Western Cape.
    Material ethnographies of multilingualism: Linguistic landscapes in the township of Khayelitsha2012In: Multilingualism, Discourse and Ethnography / [ed] S. Gardner & M. Martin-Jones, New York: Routledge, 2012, 1, p. 149-162Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Prinsloo, Mastin
    Language, Literacy and Diversity: Moving Words2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Prinsloo, Mastin
    Preface2015In: Language, Literacy and Diversity: Moving Words / [ed] Christopher Stroud, Mastin Prinsloo, New York: Routledge, 2015, p. IX-XIVChapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Wee, Lionel
    Identity, second language literacy and remedial crossing:: Exploring liminalities in social positioning in the classroom2007In: TESOL Quarterly, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 33-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Wee, Lionel
    Introduction: Political Economies of Literacy in Multilingual South-east Asia2008In: International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0050, E-ISSN 1747-7522, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 129-133Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Wee, Lionel
    National University of Singapore.
    Language planning and policy in Singaporean late modernity2010In: English in Singapore: Modernity and management / [ed] Lim, L., Pakir, A. & Wee, L., Hong Kong: Honk Kong University Press , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa .
    Williams, Quentin
    Multilingualism as utopia: Fashioning non-racial selves2017In: AILA Review, ISSN 1461-0213, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 167-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The challenge of contemporary South Africa is that of building a (post)nation of postracial equity in a fragmented world of a globalized ethical, economic and ecological meltdown. In this paper, we seek to explore the idea of multilingualism as a technology in the conceptualization of alternative, competing futures. We suggest that multilingualism is understood in terms of how encounters across difference are mediated and structured linguistically offer a space for interrupting colonial relationships. Furthermore, we argue that multilingualism should be approached as a site where colonial power dynamics of languages and speakers are troubled, and where the potential for new empowering linguistic mediations of the mutualities of our common humanity with different others are worked out.

  • 37. Williams, Q. E.
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Multilingualism remixed: Sampling, braggadocio and the stylization of local voice2013In: Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics, ISSN 2223-9936, Vol. 42, p. 17-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among the many challenges posed by contexts of social transformation and extensive mobility is the question of how multilingual voice may carry across media, modalities and context. In this paper, we suggest that one approach to this complex problem may be to look at multilingual voice from a sociolinguistic perspective of performance. Our focus here is thus on how marginalised voices on the periphery of Cape Town become mainstreamed within the city’s hip-hop community. Specifically, we ask how emcees sample local varieties of language, texts and registers to stage their particular stylisation of voice. By way of conclusion, we make brief recommendations with respect to the study of multilingualism in South Africa and how the stylisation of local voices in Cape Town hip-hop could inform studies on multilingual policy and planning.

  • 38. Williams, Quentin E.
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Linguistic citizenship Language and politics in postnational modernities2015In: Journal of Language and Politics, ISSN 1569-2159, E-ISSN 1569-9862, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 406-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major challenge facing South Africa is that of reconstructing a meaningful and inclusive notion of citizenship in the aftermath of its apartheid past and in the face of narratives of divisiveness that reach back from this past and continue to reverberate in the present. Many of the problems confronting South African social transformation are similar to the rest of the postcolonial world that continues to wrestle with the inherited colonial divide between citizen and subject. In this article, we explore how engagement with diversity and marginalization is taking place across a range of non-institutional and informal political arenas. Here, we elaborate on an approach towards the linguistic practices of the political everyday in terms of a notion of linguistic citizenship and by way of conclusion argue that the contradictions and turmoils of contemporary South Africa require further serious deliberation around alternative notions of citizenship and their semiotics.

  • 39. Williams, Quentin E.
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Linguistic citizenship: Language and politics in postnational modernities2017In: Language and Citizenship: Broadening the Agenda / [ed] Tommaso M. Milani, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017, p. 90-110Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 40. Williams, Quentin Emmanuel
    et al.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Multilingualism in transformative spaces: contact and conviviality2013In: Language Policy, ISSN 1568-4555, E-ISSN 1573-1863, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 289-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    South Africa is a highly mobile country characterized by historical displacements and contemporary mobilities, both social and demographic. Getting to grips with diversity, dislocation, relocation and anomie, as well as pursuing aspirations of mobility, is part of people's daily experience that often takes place on the margins of conventional politics. A politics of conviviality is one such form of politics of the popular that emerges in contexts of rapid change, diversity, mobility, and the negotiation and mediation of complex affiliations and attachments. The questions in focus for this paper thus pertain to how forms of talk, born out of displacement, anomie and contact in the superdiverse contexts of South Africa, allow for the articulation of life-styles and aspirations that break with the historical faultlines of social and racial oppression. We first expand upon the idea of (marginal) linguistic practices as powerful mediations of political voice and agency, an idea that can be captured in the notion of linguistic citizenship, the rhetorical foundation of a politics of conviviality. We then move on to analyze the workings of linguistic citizenship in the multilingual practices of two distinct manifestations of popular culture, namely hip hop and a performance by a stand-up comedian in Mzoli's meat market in Gugulethu, Cape Town. The paper concludes with a general discussion on the implications for politics of multilingualism and language policy.

  • 41.
    Williams, Quentin
    et al.
    University of the Western Cape.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape.
    Battling race: Stylizing language and co-producing whiteness and colourdness in a freestyle rap performance2014In: Journal of Linguistic Anthropology, ISSN 1055-1360, E-ISSN 1548-1395, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 277-293, article id DOI: 10.1111/jola.12064Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Williams, Quentin
    et al.
    University of Western Cape.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Performing rap ciphas in late modern Cape Town: Extreme locality and multilingual citizenship2010In: Africa Focus, ISSN 0772084X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 39-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of hip-hop in Cape Town, and indeed South Africa, has traditionally focused on the narratives and poetics of resistance, race and counter-hegemonic agency in the context of apartheid and the early days of post-apartheid. Despite this attention, hip-hop cipha performances remain relatively under-researched. The aim of this paper is to suggest that cipha performances display linguistic and discursive features that not only are of particular interest to rap music and hip-hop on the Cape Flats of Cape Town specifically, but that also engage core issues around multilingualism, agency and voice more generally. It demonstrates how in the process of entextualization a sense of locality, extreme locality, emerges in cipha performances by means of verbal cueing, representing place, expressing disrespect (dissing), and the (deictic) reference to local coordinates that is achieved by transposing or recontextualizing transidiomatic phrases, and by incorporating local proxemics and audience reactions through commentary and response. It concludes by suggestingthat competition around acceptable linguistic forms and framings (metalinguistic disputes) of extreme locality comprise the very micro-processes behind the formation of new registers. At the same time, these registers create the semiotic space for the exercise of agency and voice through multilingual practices, that is, multilingual citizenship.

1 - 42 of 42
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