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  • 1. Bender, German
    et al.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Myt om jobbpolarisering göder växande populism2019In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, no 12 majArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Det har blivit en etablerad sanning att de medelkvalificerade jobben minskar, medan de lägst och högst kvalificerade jobben ökar – att vi är på väg mot en jobbpolarisering. Men vi kan i en ny rapport visa att det inte stämmer att mitten av jobbfördelningen urholkats. Felsynen kan få allvarliga konsekvenser, skriver German Bender och Michael Tåhlin.

  • 2.
    Hällsten, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Korpi, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Globalization and Uncertainty: Earnings Volatility in Sweden, 1985-20032009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Earnings volatility has been linked it to economic integration only through contradictory conjectures. We assess globalization’s role by examining volatility trends in manufacturing, private services, and public services. If trade increases uncertainty, volatility trends should differ markedly across industries since manufacturing, in contrast to especially public services, is exposed to international competition. We analyze earnings trajectories in Sweden 1985-2003, a country and period evincing accelerating trade, finding no indications of greater volatility increases in manufacturing.

  • 3.
    Hällsten, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Korpi, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Globalization and Uncertainty: Earnings Volatility in Sweden, 1985-20032010In: Industrial Relations, ISSN 0019-8676, E-ISSN 1468-232X, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 165-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earnings volatility has been linked to economic integration only through contradictory conjectures. We assess globalization's role by examining volatility trends in manufacturing, private services, and public services. If trade increases uncertainty, volatility trends should differ markedly across industries since manufacturing, in contrast to especially public services, is exposed to international competition. We analyze earnings trajectories in Sweden 1985–2003, a country and period evincing accelerating trade, finding no indications of greater volatility increases in manufacturing.

  • 4.
    Kjellsson, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Magnusson, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Arbete, hälsa och genus: betydelsen av yrkets könssammansättning för kvinnors och mäns villkor i arbetslivet2014In: Jämställt arbete? Organisatoriska ramar och villkor i arbetslivet / [ed] Lena Abrahamsson, Lena Gonäs, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2014, p. 151-193Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Korpi, Tomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Changing work-life inequality in Sweden: Globalization and other causes2011In: Globalized Labour Markets and Social Inequality in Europe / [ed] Blossfeld, H-P, S. Buchholz, D. Hofäcker and K. Kolb, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, p. 177-208Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Korpi, Tomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Educational mismatch, wages, and wage growth: Overeducation in Sweden, 1974-20002007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the impact of educational mismatch on wages and wage growth in Sweden. The empirical analyses, based on cross-sectional and panel data from the Level of living surveys 1974-2000, are guided by two main hypotheses: (a) that educational mismatch reflects human capital compensation rather than real mismatch, and (b) that educational mismatch is real but dissolves with time spent in the labour market, so that its impact on wages tends toward zero over a typical worker’s career. Our findings do not support these hypotheses. First, significant differences in contemporaneous economic returns to education across match categories remain even after variations in ability are taken into account. Second, we find no evidence that the rate of wage growth is higher among overeducated workers than others. Our conclusion is that the overeducated are penalized early on by an inferior rate of return to schooling from which they do not recover.

  • 7.
    Korpi, Tomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Educational mismatch, wages, and wage growth: Overeducation in Sweden, 1974-20002009In: Labour Economics, ISSN 0927-5371, E-ISSN 1879-1034, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 183-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the impact of educational mismatch on wages and wage growth in Sweden. The empirical analyses, based on cross-sectional and panel data from the Level of living surveys 1974–2000, are guided by two main hypotheses: (a) that educational mismatch reflects human capital compensation rather than real mismatch, and (b) that educational mismatch is real but dissolves with time spent in the labour market, so that its impact on wages tends toward zero over a typical worker's career. Our findings do not support these hypotheses. First, significant differences in contemporaneous economic returns to education across match categories remain even after variations in ability are taken into account. Second, we find no evidence that the rate of wage growth is higher among overeducated workers than others. Our conclusion is that the overeducated are penalized early on by an inferior rate of return to schooling from which they do not recover.

  • 8.
    Korpi, Tomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    On-the-job training: A skill match approach to the determinants and outcomes of lifelong learning2018Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    le Grand, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Tibajev, Andrey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Vid arbetslivets gränser: sysselsättning, matchning, barriärer 1974-20102013Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    le Grand, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Class, Occupation, Wages, and Skills: The Iron Law of Labor Market Inequality2013In: Comparative Social Research, ISSN 0195-6310, Vol. 30, p. 3-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Economic inequality in contemporary advanced societies is strongly tied to the variation in wages across occupations. We examine the extent to which this variation is captured by social class and occupational prestige and ask how the associations between class, prestige, and wages can be explained. On the basis of data from 11 countries in the European Social Survey (ESS) 2004, we find (a) that class and prestige account for a very large proportion of the occupational variation in wages; (b) that the tight links between class, prestige, and wages are strongly associated with the skill requirements of jobs but only weakly tied to other positional traits, including authority, autonomy, and scarcity; and (c) that these findings are highly similar in all countries examined. We conclude that the rank order of positions in the labor market is a social constant driven by efficiency requirements of work organizations rather than by the exercise of power. This iron law of labor market inequality clearly contradicts major class theoretical models, including Wright's and Goldthorpe's. In addition to empirically refuting contemporary class theory, we offer a number of more conceptual arguments to the same effect. At a macro level, however, power relations arguably affect the rate of economic inequality by determining the reward distance between positions in the constant rank order, as indicated by the large cross-national variation in wage dispersion.

  • 11.
    le Grand, Carl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Work in Sweden 1974-2010: Work-life inequality at the intersection of class and gender2017In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 279-282Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article traces work-life evolution in Sweden during recent decades against the backdrop of long-run structural change tied to class and gender. We examine the development of four key labor market features: (a) occupational sex segregation, (b) gender gaps in job quality, (c) skill upgrading and mismatch, and (d) youth employment. While occupational and educational up-grading is beneficial for most people, some groups face waning work-life prospects. Maintaining social inclusion is the great challenge for the future.

  • 12.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Arbetslivets gränser. Sysselsättning, matchning och barriärer2014In: Ojämlikhetens dimensioner: uppväxtvillkor, arbete och hälsa i Sverige / [ed] Marie Evertsson & Charlotta Magnusson, Stockholm: Liber, 2014, p. 236-262Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Arbetslivskarriärer bland kvinnor och män i Sverige 1974-2010: Jobbkvalitet, hälsoutveckling och arbetsmarknadsutträde2013Report (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Asset specificity, labor market outcomes, and policy preferences2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Class clues2007In: European Sociological Review, Vol. 23, p. 557-572Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Distribution in the downturn2013In: Economic Crisis, Quality of Work, and Social Integration: The European Experience / [ed] Gallie, Duncan, Oxford University Press, 2013, p. 58-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Economic crisis and employment change: The great regression2013In: Economic Crisis, Quality of Work, and Social Integration: The European Experience / [ed] Gallie, Duncan, Oxford University Press, 2013, p. 30-57Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    En god utbildning gör livet bättre – och längre!2011Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Kunskap, frihet och lärande: social rang och det goda arbetet2016In: Det hotade universitetet / [ed] Shirin Ahlbäck Öberg, Li Bennich-Björkman, Jörgen Hermansson, Anna Jarstad, Christer Karlsson, Sten Widmalm, Stockholm: Dialogos Förlag, 2016, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Laissez-moi ma liberté. Pour une sociologie pluraliste.” (“Don’t fence me in: For a pluralistic sociology.”2011In: Commentaire, Vol. 34, no 136, p. 1077-1082Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Polariseringsmyten. Försvinner verkligen de medelkvalificerade jobben?2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    På senare år har en föreställning om att arbetsmarknaden polariserats fått fäste såväl inom forskningen som i samhällsdebatten. Polariseringstesen frammanar bilden av att goda jobb i arbetslivets mellanskikt är på väg att försvinna – detta brukar kallas ”mittens urholkning” – för att ersättas av dåliga jobb i strukturens bottenregioner. I denna rapport granskas polariseringstesen och dess giltighet ifrågasätts. Att jobbstrukturens högsta skikt har blivit större är oomtvistat och känt sedan länge, även om takten i denna förändring har avtagit under senare år. Men för att en polarisering ska anses ha skett måste samtidigt yrkesstrukturen på den undre halvan av fördelningen ha förskjutits nedåt –  andelen lågkvalificerade jobb måste alltså ha ökat. Detta har dock inte inträffat, enligt den empiriska analys som görs i denna rapport. I stället har en omgruppering skett: i det stora område av jobbstrukturen som ligger mellan mitten och ett nedre skikt har antalet personer som arbetar med tillverkning och distribution minskat, medan antalet personer som arbetar med omsorg och service har ökat. Denna strukturella omvandling är av horisontell snarare än (nedåtriktat) vertikal art. Nedgången av antalet personer verksamma inom tillverkning och distribution är vidare koncentrerad till de minst kvalificerade och lägst avlönade jobben, medan uppgången av antalet personer verksamma inom omsorg och service omvänt är koncentrerad till de mest kvalificerade (om än inte högavlönade) jobben. Jobbstrukturen har alltså uppgraderats både i sin övre och nedre del, och därmed måste polariseringstesens giltighet ifrågasättas. Analysen bygger främst på data från de svenska levnadsnivåundersökningarna (LNU) 1974 till 2010, men senare data från Statistiska centralbyråns yrkesregister pekar i samma riktning och liknande mönster framkommer i arbetskraftsundersökningar från ett antal EU-länder. Utöver den empiriska analysen innehåller rapporten en utförlig beskrivning och kritisk granskning av polariseringsforskningens teori och metodik. Teoretiskt lider denna forskning av ett snävt teknologiskt fokus; empiriskt hämmas den av ekonomisk närsynthet. Dess största svaghet är att den bortser från arbetslivets genusdimension och det är främst den bristen som gör att jobbstrukturens utveckling misstolkas – en felbedömning som i sin tur ger upphov till den utbredda föreställningen om så kallad jobbpolarisering. Samhällsdebatten och viktiga politiska reformer måste bygga på en  korrekt beskrivning av så fundamentala förlopp som jobbstrukturens omvandling. Det är angeläget att en noggrann granskning fortsätter, men tills vidare är den rimliga slutsatsen att såväl forskare som beslutsfattare måste förhålla sig skeptiska till tesen om jobbpolarisering.

  • 22.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Recension av: Sociological Perspectives on Labor Markets: av Bengt Furåker2007In: Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 69-73Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Skills and wages in European labour markets: Structure and change2007In: Employment Regimes and the Quality of Work, Oxford University Press , 2007, p. 35-76Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Släpp sociologerna löss!: (Replik till Bengt Furuåker)2008Other (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Vertical differentiation of work tasks: Conceptual and measurement issues.2011In: Empirical Research in Vocational Education and Training, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 55-70Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Överutbildning i Sverige: utveckling och konsekvenser2007In: Utbildningsvägen - vart leder den? Om ungdomar, yrkesutbildning och försörjning, SNS förlag, Stockholm , 2007, p. 70-89Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Korpi, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    A tale of two distinctions: The significance of job requirements and informal workplace training for the training gap2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    le Grand, Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    En generell förklaring till ojämlikhet i arbetslivet2009In: Från klass till organisation. En resa genom det sociala landskapet / [ed] Christine Roman, Lars Udéhn, Malmö: Liber , 2009, p. 38-61Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    le Grand, Carl
    Szulkin, Ryszard
    Skills and wages in the Swedish labour market: Structure and change 1968-20002006In: Japanese Journal of Northern European Studies, Vol. 3, p. 43-63Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Tåhlin, Michael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Westerman, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Youth employment decline and the structural change of skill2020In: European Societies: The Official Journal of the European Sociological Association, ISSN 1461-6696, E-ISSN 1469-8307, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 47-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Labor market prospects for youth have deteriorated significantly in many OECD countries over recent decades. While the extent and consequences of falling youth employment are commonly studied, attempts at understanding its causes have been much more limited. The present paper attempts to fill this explanatory gap. We suggest that the secular decline in youth employment can be accounted for by the structural change of skill. This process of structural change has two interrelated components: (a) one part where skill supply (individual educational attainment) and skill demand (educational requirements of jobs) grow together in what can be called matched upgrading and (b) another part where excess skill supply leads to mismatch and crowding-out. These components of skill growth have commonly been treated separately and incompletely in the literature. We build on both of them in developing our account of why the labor market for youth has weakened. Using data on 10 European countries from the EU Labor Force Surveys over the period 1998 to 2015, we estimate associations between the structural change of skill and youth employment decline. The main conclusion is that both matched skill upgrading and overeducation are strongly and negatively linked to young people’s employment chances.

1 - 30 of 30
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