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  • 1.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Exploring the Design Space of Genre Pedagogy and Virtual Learning Environments2012In: Designs for Learning 2012: 3rd International Conference Exploring Learning Environments. Conference Proceedings, 2012, p. 75-77Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the design space of genre pedagogy and virtual learning environments. This is done by examining the cornerstones of genre pedagogy and the main activities they give raise to, and how the activities are transformed when they are partly or completely moved from the classroom to virtual learning environments, and what implications for interaction design they give raise to.

  • 2.
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Unpacking Emergent Teaching Practices with Digital Technology2019In: Emergent practices and material conditions in teaching and learning with technologies / [ed] Teresa Cerratto Pargman, Isa Jahnke, Springer, 2019, no 1, p. 33-51Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What changes when digital technology is used in the classroom, and how do we identify these changes? These questions motivated the present study, which sought to contribute to the discourse on the digitalization of schools from the perspective of teachers’ everyday practice. The analysis was grounded in the scrutiny of 11 semi-structured interviews and field notes stemming from ethnographic observations carried out in classrooms, breaks, and teachers’ workshops. The data were analyzed in terms of materials, competences, meanings, and experiential qualities (i.e., referring to how certain properties of a digital design are experienced in use). The experiential qualities that emerged from the analysis of the data show an interrelation between the elements of practice; in particular, they reflect a visible, problem-solving and adaptive teaching practice that develops with the use of digital technologies in the classroom. Such a practice is characterized as effective, evidence-based, and liberated from time and space communication. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to, the emergence of the teachers’ practice of experimenting with the digital materials, and the emergence of a managerial communication practice in the elementary school. The chapter contributes to the discussion of the tensions between incremental and radical changes in teaching with digital technologies and offers an elaboration of the relevance of a lens on practice in studies about technology and education.

  • 3.
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Jahnke, Isa
    Emergent practices and material conditions in teaching and learning with technologies2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book explores the complexities of interacting with digital technologies in the everyday flow of practices in schools, museums, and the home. In particular, the authors pay attention to the material conditions of such practices via the exploration of media discourses on information and communication technologies in the classroom; the ongoing digitization of the school; the use of video chat for language learning; the instantiation of CrossActionSpaces in an urban science classrooms; the development of symbolic technologies such as the Carbon Footprint Calculator; the design of apps and virtual museums for learning science; the use of text message tools for collaborative learning in teacher education and the design, implementation, and evaluation of Augmented Reality apps in outdoor learning. The book is grounded in case studies presented by scholars at the workshop, “Changing Teaching and Learning Practices in Schools with Tablet-Mediated Collaborative Learning: Nordic, European and International Views” and the workshop “Emergent Practices and Material Conditions in Tablet-mediated Collaborative Learning and Teaching” both of which have been held at the Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning conference (CSCL). This volume brings together inspirational and high-quality chapters that raise a range of important ideas and showcase the importance of looking beyond technology-enhanced learning. Taken together, this volume unpacks a variety of everyday situations by engaging with what is really happening with digital technologies rather than what is expected to happen with them in educational settings. The take-away message is a call for research on learning, teaching, and digital technologies that enables engagement with the materiality of educational practices and, in particular, their constitutive relationships that configure the contemporary educational practices of the digital age.

  • 4.
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Jahnke, Isa
    Introduction into Emergent Practices and Material Conditions in Learning and Teaching with Technologies2019In: Emergent practices and material conditions in teaching and learning with technologies / [ed] Teresa Cerratto Pargman, Isa Jahnke, Springer, 2019, no 1, p. 3-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume invites the reader to explore the complexities and the dynamic character of interacting with technologies that unfold in the everyday flow of practices in schools, museums, field trips, and the home. In particular, we paid attention to the material conditions of such practices via, for instance, the exploration of media discourses on information and communication technologies in the classroom; the ongoing digitization of the school; the use of video chat for language learning; the instantiation of CrossActionSpaces in urban science classrooms; the development of symbolic technologies such as the Carbon Footprint Calculator; the design of apps and virtual museums for learning science; the use of text message tools for collaborative learning in teacher education and the design, implementation, and evaluation of Augmented Reality (AR) apps in outdoor learning. As a result, this volume brings together inspirational and high-quality chapters that raise a range of important ideas and showcase the importance of looking beyond technology-enhanced learning. Five take-away messages are presented at the end of this chapter. They summarize how the chapters included in this volume contribute to understanding everyday practice and materiality as constitutive of human cognition, agency, educational values and creative critique. Taken together they call for complementary views of research on technologies in education and invite scholars in the field to reimagine studies about learning and teaching in the digital age.

  • 5.
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Jahnke, Isa
    Next Steps: Toward a Relational Mode of Thinking for Educational Technology2019In: Emergent practices and material conditions in teaching and learning with technologies / [ed] Teresa Cerratto Pargman, Isa Jahnke, Springer, 2019, p. 257-259Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The work presented in this edited volume brings together inspirational and high-quality chapters that call for more conversations in our field. Together with critique and care, we hope the work initiated here will continue disentangling, assembling, and giving form to new arguments able to structure a more nuanced and deeper dialogue on teaching and learning with digital technology.

  • 6.
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Joshi, Somya
    Wehn, Uta
    Experimenting with Novel Forms of Computing: The case of the Swedish Citizen Observatory for Water Quality Conservation2019In: Proceedings of the Fifth Workshop on Computing within Limits, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2019, article id 8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Anthropocene, we are looking at an impending future that is characterized by resource scarcity. In this paper we ask how socio-technical arrangements can facilitate a transition from the course we are on today to one of adaptation and conservation. Taking the case of citizen observatories (COs) for water quality conservation as an illustrative lens, this paper analyses the potential of COs to form Publics for management and stewardship of natural resources from a Computing within Limits perspective. Based on interviews, participant observations and co-design workshops with a wide range of stakeholders, we draw attention to 1) the complexities of water quality management in Sweden, 2) the differing views of policymakers and citizens about citizen participation in water governance and 3) designers' efforts in co-developing a sustainable socio-technical system for bringing about change in water quality management. Our work contributes to research on Computing within Limits by identifying opportunities and challenges that arise when designers seek to form Publics and through them transform institutional arrangements.

  • 7.
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Taking an instrumental genesis lens: New insights into collaborative mobile learning2018In: British Journal of Educational Technology, ISSN 0007-1013, E-ISSN 1467-8535, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 219-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we argue that in order to gain a deeper understanding of collaborative mobile learning in schools, it is important to know not only how mobile devices affect collaborative learning but also how collaborative learning emerges and is mediated by these devices. We develop our argument by applying the instrumental genesis theory and the collective instrumented activities and situations model for the analysis of learners' collaborative learning in the tablet-mediated classroom. This analysis is grounded in data collected in four elementary Swedish schools (ie, from fourth to eighth grade). From the data, we considered the learners' conversation in English as a foreign language, inquiry-based learning in the natural sciences classroom and game-based learning in the arithmetic classroom. On the one hand, the scrutiny of these specific activities led us to distinguish the pragmatic, epistemic, and reflexive instrumental mediations that have already been theorized in the instrumental genesis theory. On the other hand, they helped us to identify two additional ones, which we call emotional and spatial. Based on these findings, we claim that collaboration in the tablet-mediated classroom is a complex activity that emerges from a variety of instrumental mediations that configure contemporary collaborative mobile learning.

  • 8.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Pour une conception des technologies centrée sur l'activité du sujet: le cas de l'écriture de groupe avec collecticiel2006In: Modèles du sujet pour la conception: dialectiques activités développement / [ed] Pierre Rabardel, Pierre Pastré, Toulouse: Octarès , 2006, p. 157-188Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The use of synchronous text-based environments for teacher professional development2001In: Chat-Kommunikation: Sprache, Interaktion, Sozialität & Identität in synchroner computervermittelter kommunikation: Perspektiven auf ein interdisziplinäres Forschungsfeld / [ed] Michael Beisswenger, Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag, 2001Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Jahnke, Isa
    Damsa, Crina
    Nussbaum, Miguel
    Säljö, Roger
    Emergent Practices and Material Conditions in Tablet-mediated Collaborative Learning and Teaching2017In: Making a Difference: Prioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL: 12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) 2017, Volume 2 / [ed] Brian K. Smith, Marcela Borge, Emma Mercier, Kyu Yon Lim, International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2017, p. 905-908Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The way in which digital technologies take part and contribute to configuring teaching and collaborative learning practices has become a timely research matter in our field. Current studies in the CSCL field, and particularly on the use of tablets in education, draw attention to how everyday educational practices are entangled with contemporary technologies and, how these technologies shape in turn such practices, in schools and higher education. This half-day workshop aims specifically at accounting for emergent practices in tablet-mediated collaborative learning and teaching, with a particularly focus on the material conditions that constitute such practices. The workshop invites researchers, designers and practitioners to contribute and engage with in-depth analyses of the use of tablets in everyday teaching and learning, in schools and higher education contexts. Furthermore, the workshop intends to trigger and facilitate participants to generate/propose conceptual and methodological analytical tools for examining the material conditions of tablet-mediated collaborative learning and teaching practices. The outcomes of the workshop will consist of (1) a repertoire of (identified) emergent practices bounded to the use of tablets in schools and higher education, reported by the participants, (2) a set of conceptual and analytical tools for the study of material conditions of CSCL practices and (3) a network bringing together researchers, practitioners and designers to set up a research agenda and initiate a consortium including the organisation of a special issue in an International journal.

  • 11.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Joshi, Somya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Reconfiguring civic participation: open source software in the political space2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Discourses on participation, democracy and politics are today profoundly questioned and challenged. Internet and the entrance of open source software into the governmental sphere have much contributed toward the shift in understandings of citizen participation, their rights and representation. In the field of participatory design such an inquiry is reflected in a shift of focus regarding the study of the use of technologies within government. From being concerned by issues on transparency and equity researchers are nowadays more prone to explore issues regarding the transformative power or/and performativity of open source software in contexts such as government. This paper describes the case of the political “Net Party” which in 2013 introduced the platform “Democracy OS” into the legislature of the Ciudad de Buenos Aires in Argentina. The question that motivates the study is: Do open source tools redefine the political space and reconfigure citizen civic participation? And if so, how? The paper contributes five analytical axes for scrutinizing the entrance of open source tools into the political space.

  • 12.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Joshi, Somya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Understanding Limits from a Social-Ecological perspective2015In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The latest developments in the field of HCI have given rise to an increasing interest in issues pertaining to global warming, resource depletion and environmental degradation. Concern about such issues has contributed to give shape to the design space of sustainable HCI (SHCI); a space whose boundaries are at times blurred. On the one hand, some, design “sustainable” information technology based on visions of the world that do not really question limits to continuous economic growth and, on the other hand, others embrace the design of information technology from stances that acknowledges limits (i.e., economic, ecological, energetic). This paper introduces the perspective of social ecology into SHCI. This perspective provides us with a core set of principles that makes us situate computing at the intersection of physical (natural) and moral (human) qualities of our human environment systems. As such it confronts us with choices to be made in the challenging years to come and invites us to argue about the very purpose of information technology in a world of limitations.

  • 13.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Järvela, Sanna M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Designing Nordic Technology-enhanced Learning2012In: The Internet and higher education, ISSN 1096-7516, E-ISSN 1873-5525, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 227-230Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The latest developments of information and communication technologies (ICT) and its large penetration in different sectors of our society pose new challenges and demands in the field of education. This special issue entitled "Designing Nordic technology-enhanced learning (TEL)", presents and discusses how researchers in the Nordic countries are currently framing and thinking about issues that are related to pedagogical design of learning spaces, digital literacies, educational professional development, design of tools engaging students in collaborative inquiry learning as well as design-oriented multimodal understandings of learning. The objective pursued with the special issue has been to reflect upon current problems that educational institutions, practitioners and TEL researchers are facing in the Nordic countries as regards the acknowledgment of young people's ICT practices within formal education. Such analytical work has led us to identify and elaborate on what we believe constitute forthcoming research challenges for learning and education in the Nordic countries.

  • 14.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Celikten, Emre
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Sneiders, Eriks
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Dalianis, Hercules
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    User Centered Development of Automatic E-mail Answering for the Public Sector2012In: Human-Computer Interaction, Tourism and Cultural Heritage / [ed] Francisco Cipolla-Ficarra, Kim Veltman, Huang Chih-Fang, Miguel Cipolla-Ficarra, Andreas Kratky, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2012, Vol. 7546, p. 154-156Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, the use of e-mail by the public sector has become a key communication service between citizens and governmental authorities. Although the integration of e-mail in the public sector has certainly brought citizens and handling officers closer, it has also introduced a particular vision on governmental authorities such as for instance the idea that public service and information should be available to citizens any time, anywhere. Such a belief among citizens puts certainly high demands on the quality and efficiency of the e-service governmental authorities are capable to provide. In fact, the growing number of citizens’ electronic requests must be accurately answered in a limited time. In the research project IMAIL (Intelligent e-mail answering service for eGovernment) [1], we have focused on the work carried out at the Swedish Social Insurance Agency (SSIA) that exemplifies a governmental authority dealing with 500,000 emails per year on top of face-to face meetings, phone calls and chat communication. With the objective of creating an e-mail client capable to ease and ensure the quality of SSIAs’ handling officers public service, we have developed a prototype that: (1) automatically answer a large part of simple questions in the incoming e-mail flow, (2) improve the quality of the semi- automatic answers (i.e. answer templates), and finally, (3) reduce the workload for the handling officers. The development of the prototype is grounded in an empirical study conducted at the SSIA. The study comprises the analysis and clustering of 10,000 citizens e-mails and the working activity of 15 handling officers that were collected through questionnaires, interviews and workshops [2].

  • 15.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Daniel, Spikol
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Otero, Nuno
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Exploring Teachers’ perspectives on the use of Mobile devices for Math and Language Learning2014In: Conference proceedings: 4th international Designs for Learning conference 6-9th May 2014, Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Karlström, Petter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Materiality of Online Students’ Peer-Review Activities in Higher Education2015In: Exploring the Material Conditions of Learning: The Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Conference 2015: Conference Proceedings. Volume 1 / [ed] Oskar Lindwall, Päivi Häkkinen, Timothy Koschmann, Pierre Tchounikine, Sten Ludvigsen, International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2015, p. 308-315Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In spite of the widespread use of technology in higher education, discourses on learning technologies commonly account for their features as disembodied from their use. There has so far been few theoretical approaches which have delved into "the technology question" in CSCL. We present an empirical study that investigates how students’ peer-review activities are entangled with sociomaterial aspects of mediated collaborative learning. The students' peer-review activities were analyzed according to the Collective Instrument-mediated Activity Situation (CIAS) model, and findings show that the materiality of two different tools had considerable influenced how students engaged with the texts and how they interacted with each other.

  • 17.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Otero, Nuno
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Purposeful Learning Across Collaborative Educational Spaces2014In: 11 th International conference of the learning sciences: proceedings / [ed] Joseph L. Polman et al, New York: International Society of the Learning Sciences , 2014, p. 1597-1598Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Näslund, Anders
    Feldt, Tommy
    The use of social annotations tools in higher education2014In: Conference proseedings: 4th international Designs for Learning conference 6-9th May 2014, Stockholm: Stockholm University , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Milrad, Marcelo
    Beyond Innovation in Mobile Learning: towards Sustainability in Schools2016In: Mobile learning: the next generation / [ed] John Traxler, Agnes Kukulska-Hulme, New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 154-178Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    One Tablet, Multiple Epistemic Instruments in the Everyday Classroom2017In: Data Driven Approaches in Digital Education: Proceedings / [ed] Élise Lavoué, Hendrik Drachsler, Katrien Verbert, Julien Broisin, Mar Pérez-Sanagustín, Springer, 2017, p. 379-384Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grounded in the analyses of 23 semi-structured interviews and 31 field notes from classroom observations, this study scrutinizes the relationships that teachers and learners entertain with/through the tablet in their process of technology appropriation in the classroom. The results reveal that, on the one hand, the learners elaborate a variety of instruments from their interactions with the tablet and, on the other hand, that the teachers’ appropriation plays a central role in configuring a creative, critical and participatory pedagogy in the contemporary classroom.

  • 21.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tablets in the CSCL Classroom: A Lens on Teachers’ Instrumental Geneses2017In: Making a Difference: Prioritizing Equity and Access in CSCL: 12th International Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) 2017, Volume 2 / [ed] Brian K. Smith, Marcela Borge, Emma Mercier, Kyu Yon Lim, International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2017, p. 837-838Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most educational research on tablets in schools seeks to find out whether children learn more efficiently with or without such devices. This study differs from such research as it instead investigates how tablets take part in the everyday CSCL classroom? Grounded in the instrumental genesis theory, this study focuses on the multifarious relationships between teacher-tablets-learner(s) to inform the processes of tablet appropriation in the classroom. Analysis of the instrumental processes observed reveals that learners on the one hand develop usage schemes that challenge those developed by the teachers. Teachers on the other hand are forced to review their competence, rethinking power-relationships vis-à-vis learners and have to reflect/design a creative, critical and participatory pedagogical practice that is aligned with learners’ utilization schemes and the instruments they bring to our contemporary classrooms.

  • 22.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Pargman, Daniel
    Nardi, Bonnie
    The Internet at the eco-village: Performing Sustainability in the twenty-first century2016In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 21, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is the digital infrastructure and its footprint an ideological blind spot for recently emerging ecological communities, including eco-villages? This paper examines how a group of people who are concerned with environmental issues such as peak oil and climate change are orchestrating a transition toward a more sustainable and resilient way of living. We studied a Swedish eco-village, considering how computing in this community contributes to defining what alternative ways of living might look like in the twenty-first century. Drawing on a social-ecological perspective, the analysis illustrates, on the one hand, that the Internet, along with the digital devices we use to access it, capitalizes and mobilizes values, knowledge and social relationships that in turn enhance resilience in the eco-village. On the other hand, the analysis shows that an explicit focus on ecological values is not sufficient for a community of individuals to significantly transform Internet use to conform to ecological ideals. This work contributes to a deeper understanding of the imbrication of social technologies with practices that are oriented to perform sustainable and resilient ways of living.

  • 23.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Barkhuus, Louise
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Understanding Audience Participation in Interactive Theater Performances2014In: Proceeding NordiCHI '14 Proceedings of the 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: fun, Fast, Foundational, New York: ACM Press, 2014, p. 608-617Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an empirical study investigating audience participation in an interactive theater performance. During the performance, audience members were enticed to act upon and contribute to the performance by sharing their opinions, emotions, values and other thoughts, by means of text messages that were integrated into the performance itself. The study aimed at understanding the main characteristics of audience participation in the interactive performance, as well as the role of communication technology as a medium enabling social participation. The results draw attention to the immediate and reflective facets of audience participation, both unfolding at two different but interrelated levels of interactions: an individual and collective one.

  • 24.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Linnaeus University.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Mobile Devices as Support Rather than Distraction for Mobile Learners: Evaluating Guidelines for Design2011In: International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning, ISSN 1941-8647, E-ISSN 1941-8655, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article questions the design of mobile learning activities that lead students to spend time focusing on the mobile devices at the expense of interacting with other students or exploring the environment. This problem is approached from an interaction design perspective, designing and analysing geometry-learning activities. The authors present six guidelines for designing mobile learning activities, where mobile devices support rather than distract students from contents and contexts relevant to the learning goals. The guidelines are developed through video analysis of groups of middle school students doing learning activities outdoors and evaluated using the task model. The guidelines suggest that students (1) assume roles based on a different functionality of each device, (2) use devices as contextual tools, that the activities, (3) include physical interaction with the environment, (4) let teachers assume roles, (5) encourage face-to-face communication, and (6) introduce students to the mobile devices.

  • 25.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Karlsson, Olov
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Evaluating Interaction with Mobile Devices in Mobile Inquiry-Based Learning2012In: WMUTE '12 Proceedings of the 2012 IEEE Seventh International Conference on Wireless, Mobile and Ubiquitous Technology in Education, Washington, DC, USA: IEEE Computer Society, 2012, p. 92-96Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We evaluate to what extent students are interacting with mobile devices in one of four ways intended in the design of a mobile learning activity. Video data from one class of fifth grade students were analyzed using a model of four different types of interaction. The evaluation shows that the students interacted with the devices in the ways intended in design 64% of the time. The contribution is an approach for translating learning goals to interaction design goals in mobile learning research. We conclude that this approach can be of value in designing and evaluating interaction with mobile devices for an entire mobile learning activity.

  • 26.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Using smartphones and QR codes for supporting students in exploring tree species2013In: Scaling up Learning for Sustained Impact: 8th European Conference, on Technology Enhanced Learning, EC-TEL 2013, Paphos, Cyprus, September 17-21, 2013. Proceedings / [ed] Davinia Hernández-Leo, Tobias Ley, Ralf Klamma, Andreas Harrer, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 436-441Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Smartphones are increasingly being used on field trips to support students in exploring the natural world. In this paper we present a design and analysis of an inquiry-based learning field trip for primary school students. One problem for design is how to make use of smartphones to support, rather than distract, students in interacting with the physical environment. We approach this problem by comparing two alternative designs, where students use smartphones for identifying tree species either by using an identification instrument or by reading a text description. The results show that students made use of the instrument for identification, QR codes, for identifying tree species and made use of the text descriptions for searching for tree species. In this sense, QR codes, connecting contextual information on smartphones to the physical environment, work as a learning tool that may be used for orienting students in their interaction with the physical environment.

  • 27.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Nouri, Jalal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Design Heuristics for Balancing Visual Focus on Devices in Formal Mobile Learning Activities2010In:  , 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Eliasson, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Spikol, Daniel
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Get the bees away from the hive: Balancing visual focus on devices in mobile learning2010In: IADIS International Conference Mobile Learning 2010, Porto, Portugal, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Hansson, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Choi, Jaz Hee-jeong
    Cerratto Pargman, Tessy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Bardzell, Shaowen
    Forlano, Laura
    DiSalvo, Carl
    Lindtner, Silvia
    Joshi, Somya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ting: making publics through provocation, conflict and appropriation2016In: Proceedings of the 14th Participatory Design Conference: Short Papers, Interactive Exhibitions, Workshops, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, Vol. 2, p. 109-110Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Swedish the word "ting" has different meanings. It can mean "things", "matters" and "a session at court" as well as the act of appropriating space. This one-day workshop starts in the notion of the artifact as a "ting", and design as something that raises a question, provokes a discussion, and creates a public through which agonistic encounters occur. This particular lens allows us to approach design beyond 'merely producing artifacts'. Instead, we come to see it as a production of provocations, speculations, and alternative interpretations of the social world as well as new sets of relationships between participants in this public.

    Because of the importance of the role and embodiment of the designer/artist in making publics, this workshop calls attention to self-reflective practices in participatory design, and questions how these practices can be embedded in the functionality of new publics and design practices.

  • 30.
    Hansson, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Forlano, Laura
    Choi, Jaz Hee-jeong
    DiSalvo, Carl
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Bardzell, Shaowen
    Lindtner, Silvia
    Joshi, Somya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Provocation, Conflict, and Appropriation: The Role of the Designer in Making Publics2018In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 3-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Hansson, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Forlano, Laura
    Hee-jeong Choi, Jaz
    DiSalvo, Carl
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Bardzell, Shaowen
    Lindtner, Silvia
    Joshi, Somya
    Provocation, Conflict, and Appropriation: The Role of the Designer in Making Publics2018In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 3-7Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The role and embodiment of the designer/artist in making publics is significant. This special issue draws attention to reflexive practices in Art & Design, and questions how these practices are embedded in the formations and operations of publics, grounded in six cases of participatory design conducted in the United States, India, Turkey, England, Denmark, and Belgium. From these design practices, typologies of participation are formulated that describe the role of the designer. These typologies describe different and sometimes conflicting epistemologies—providing designers with a vocabulary to communicate a diversity of participatory settings and supporting reflexive practices.

  • 32. Jahnke, Isa
    et al.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Furberg, Anniken
    Järvelä, Sanna
    Wasson, Barbara
    Changing Teaching and Learning Practices in Schools with Tablet-Mediated Collaborative Learning (#TMCL15): Nordic, European and International Views2015In: Exploring the Material Conditions of Learning: The Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Conference 2015: Conference Proceedings / [ed] Oskar Lindwall, Päivi Häkkinen, Timothy Koschmann, Pierre Tchounikine, Sten Ludvigsen, International Society of the Learning Sciences, 2015, Vol. 1, p. 889-893Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33. Josefsson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Hrastinski, Stefan
    Pargman, Daniel
    Pargman, Teresa C.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    The student, the private and the professional role: Students’ social media use2016In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 1583-1594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that students perceive a distinct divide between educational and private use of social media. The present study explores this divide by focusing on master students’ perception of roles when using social media in a higher education context. A qualitative method has been used, mainly comprising of analyses of home exams and interviews, which were conducted with students enrolled in the master’s course “Social media technologies”. Results support previous research stating that students perceived a distinct divide between educational and private use of social media, and furthermore provide a more detailed understanding of this divide. The results from the study also indicate that there is yet another type of use: social media as a tool for career-building purposes, or what is labeled as professional use. Implications of social media for use in higher education are described through the analysis of three roles as performed by the individual: the student role in educational settings, the professional role for career-building, and the private role.

  • 34.
    Joshi, Somya
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Every Little Bit Makes Little Difference: The Paradox within SHCI2018In: Digital Technology and Sustainability: Engaging the paradox / [ed] Mike Hazas, Lisa P. Nathan, Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Joshi, Somya
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    In Search of Fairness: Critical Design Alternatives for Sustainability2015In: Proceedings of The Fifth Decennial Aarhus Conference on Critical Alternatives, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2015, p. 37-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Caught between the infinite promise unleashed by technology proliferation and the unprecedented scale of resource depletion, waste and inequity, we inhabit a space where critical alternatives are sought more than ever. As a reflection of the above, we find in HCI, a slant towards technological fixes to existing sustainability problems, as opposed to a more holistic approach that includes behavioural and societal change. It is within this context that this paper is situated, where we propose a socio-ecological approach and argue our case for a life-cycle lens towards building systems that are in line with current understanding of the earth’s finite resources. We do so by presenting an illustrative case study of what such critical alternatives might look like, by examining the Fairphone movement. We contribute to a deeper understanding of how social value laden enterprises along with open technological design can shape sustainable relationships between our environment and us.

  • 36.
    Joshi, Somya
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    On fairness & sustainability: Motivating change in the networked society2015In: Proceedings of EnviroInfo and ICT for Sustainability 2015, Atlantis Press, 2015, p. 335-344Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Caught between the infinite promise unleashed by technology proliferation and the unprecedented scale of resource depletion, waste and inequity, we inhabit a space where critical alternatives are sought more than ever. As a reflection of the above, we find in HCI, a slant towards technological quick-fixes to existing sustainability problems, as opposed to a more holistic approach that includes behavioural and societal change. It is within this context that this paper is situated, where we propose a socio-ecological approach and argue our case for a life-cycle lens towards building systems that are in line with our current understanding of the earth’s finite resources. We do so by presenting an illustrative case study of what such critical alternatives might look like, by examining the Fairphone movement. We contribute to a deeper understanding of how social value laden enterprises along with open technological design can shape sustainable relationships between our environment and us.

  • 37.
    Joshi, Somya
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Gazis, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Pargman, Daniel
    Whose Future Is It Anyway? Limits within Policy Modeling2016In: LIMITS '16: Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Computing within Limits, ACM Press, 2016, article id 5Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the age of Big Open Linked Data (BOLD), we inhabit a landscape where future scenarios are imagined, modeled, planned for and embedded in policy. Between the euphoric techno-utopian rhetoric of the boundless potential of BOLD innovations and the dystopian view of the dangers of such innovations (e.g. ubiquitous surveillance etc.), this paper offers a critical understanding of the boundaries that are traversed by the implementation of BOLD within policy modeling. We examine BOLD as a tool for imagining futures, for reducing uncertainties, for providing legitimacy and for concentrating power. In doing so we further develop the LIMITs community's conceptualization of the societal limitations on computing, with specific reference to the assumptions, interpretations and trust that we place in these models when making socio-environmental policy decisions. We use an illustrative case of policy modeling, which provides a much-needed critical discussion of the inherent limitations and risks as well as the promises that are offered by BOLD.

  • 38.
    Karlström, Petter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Analyzing student activity in computer assisted language learning2006In: The Sixth IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT 2006), 2006, p. 222-226Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Karlström, Petter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    Literate tools or tools for literacy?: A critical approach to language tools in second language learning2008In: Digital Kompetanse - Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, ISSN 0809-6724, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 97-112Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Karlström, Petter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lindström, Henrik
    Knutsson, Ola
    Tool mediation in Focus on Form activities: case studies in a grammar-exploring environment2007In: ReCALL, ISSN 0958-3440, E-ISSN 1474-0109, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 39-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present two case studies of two different pedagogical tasks in a Computer Assisted Language Learning environment called Grim. The main design principle in Grim is to support ‘Focus on Form’ in second language pedagogy. Grim contains several language technology-based features for exploring linguistic forms (static, rule-based and statistical), intended to be used while writing. Our question is, in what ways does Grim support Focus on Form in actual classroom use. We have explored this question within sociocultural theory, emphasizing tool mediation and how tools shape the learner’s activity. The first case concerns a text-reconstruction exercise in which students worked in a pair within the Grim environment. The second case was conducted with another group of students, who engaged in collaborative revision of texts, written in advance by one of the students, in student pairs. In both studies, students were instructed and encouraged to use the different features of Grim. Data was collected by recording dialogue during the sessions with Grim. Our results show how learners put the features of Grim into use in their writing tasks. In some instances, the program was used creatively, in combination with external tools such as the users’ own dictionaries, knowledge of other languages, or teachers. In other instances, we note that Grim was used for error correction, rather than as a language resource. The learners’ activities are thus transformed by their use of the program, from the tasks of revision and text-reconstruction into error correction. The application shapes the activity, in conjunction with the pedagogical tasks. We argue for studying the activities of students with CALL tools, in order to find out in detail how tasks and technology concur in use and what view on language and pedagogy they mediate.

  • 41.
    Karlström, Petter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tools, language technology and communication in computer assisted language learning2006In: Writing and digital media / [ed] Luuk Van Waes, Mariëlle Leijten, Christine M. Neuwirth, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2006, p. 189-198Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Karlström, Petter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Tools, language technology and communication in computer assisted language learning2006In: Writing and digital media / [ed] Luuk Van Waes, Mariëlle Leijten, Christine M. Neuwirth, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2006, 1. ed.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Karlström, Petter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Lindström, Henrik
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Knutsson, Ola
    KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tool Mediation in Focus on Form Activities: Case studies in a grammar-exploring environment2007In: ReCALL, ISSN 0958-3440, E-ISSN 1474-0109, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 39-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present two case studies of two different pedagogical tasks in a Computer Assisted Language Learning environment called Grim. The main design principle in Grim is to support ‘Focus on Form’ in second language pedagogy. Grim contains several language technology-based features for exploring linguistic forms (static, rule-based and statistical), intended to be used while writing. Our question is, in what ways does Grim support Focus on Form in actual classroom use. We have explored this question within sociocultural theory, emphasizing tool mediation and how tools shape the learner’s activity. The first case concerns a text-reconstruction exercise in which students worked in a pair within the Grim environment. The second case was conducted with another group of students, who engaged in collaborative revision of texts, written in advance by one of the students, in student pairs. In both studies, students were instructed and encouraged to use the different features of Grim. Data was collected by recording dialogue during the sessions with Grim. Our results show how learners put the features of Grim into use in their writing tasks. In some instances, the program was used creatively, in combination with external tools such as the users’ own dictionaries, knowledge of other languages, or teachers. In other instances, we note that Grim was used for error correction, rather than as a language resource. The learners’ activities are thus transformed by their use of the program, from the tasks of revision and text-reconstruction into error correction. The application shapes the activity, in conjunction with the pedagogical tasks. We argue for studying the activities of students with CALL tools, in order to find out in detail how tasks and technology concur in use and what view on language and pedagogy they mediate.

  • 44.
    Knutsson, Ola
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Severinson Eklundh, Kerstin
    KTH, stockholm, sweden.
    Westlund, Stefan
    KTH, stockholm, sweden.
    Designing and developing a language environment for second language writers2007In: Computers and education, ISSN 0360-1315, E-ISSN 1873-782X, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 1122-1146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a field study carried out with learners who used a grammar checker in real writing tasks in an advanced course at a Swedish university. The objective of the study was to investigate how students made use of the grammar checker in their writing while learning Swedish as a second language. Sixteen students with different linguistic and cultural backgrounds participated in the study. A judgment procedure was conducted by the learners on the alarms from the grammar checker. The students’ texts were also collected in two versions; a version written before the session with the grammar checker, and a version after the session. This procedure made it possible to study to what extent the students followed the advice from the grammar checker, and how this was related to their judgments of its behavior.

    The results obtained demonstrated that although most of the alarms from the grammar checker were accurate, some alarms were very hard for the students to judge correctly. The results also showed that providing the student with feedback on different aspects of their target language use; not only on their errors, and facilitating the processes of language exploration and reflection are important processes to be supported in second-language learning environments.

    Based on these results, design principles were identified and integrated in the development of Grim, an interactive language-learning program for Swedish. We present the design of Grim, which is grounded in visualization of grammatical categories and examples of language use, providing tools for both focus on linguistic code features and language comprehension.

  • 45. Koskinen, Ilpo
    et al.
    Lim, Youn-kyungCerratto-Pargman, TeresaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.Chow, KennyOdom, William
    Proceedings of the 2018 Designing Interactive Systems Conference2018Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We are pleased to welcome Designing Interactive Systems DIS 2018 to Hong Kong. DIS 2018 is the first of its kind in two ways. It is in Asia for the first time. It is also in an art and design school for the first time. The theme of the conference is Design and Diversity. The theme reflects a classic design theme - and also a foundational distinction in philosophy - of universals and particulars. Should we, as designers, follow Silicon Valley in its quest for products that engage everyone on the planet, or the architect Glenn Murcutt's conviction that he can only build in places he knows so well that his designs can be outstanding? The underlying logic of this question divides designers and design disciplines and emerges in every design process. This theme operated as a guiding tool for selecting our four keynotes, professors Jodi Forlizzi, Kun-pyo Lee, Phoebe Sengers and Erik Stolterman. During their years in design, they have lived through its diversities. We were happy that they accepted the challenge to share their experiences and thoughts about diversity to the benefit of our community. The theme was also our tool for directing the DIS community into the future. A few years from now, we hope, we will start to see answers to the challenges our keynotes are posing to us. The nucleus of the conference organization were two chairs and three technical chairs. This small group invited sixteen Subcommittee Chairs, three Pictorials chairs, and two chairs each for Workshops, Provocations and Work-in-Progress, Doctoral Consortium, and Demos. These chairs recruited 100 Associate Chairs, who recruited 1818 reviewers. Our review and decision schedule was brutal, but the organization worked through it efficiently, always with humor, and with collegial respect. DIS 2018 received 645 submissions: 405 for full papers and notes submissions; 71 for pictorials; 23 for workshops submissions; 107 for Provocations and Work-in-Progress (out of these, 19 were Provocations); 20 for Doctoral Consortium Submissions; and 19 for Demos. Acceptance rates were: 23% for papers and notes, 24% Pictorials, 55% for Workshops, 73% for Demos, 53% for PWiPs, and 50% for Doctoral Consortium. All this work led into a highly competitive conference between 9-13 June. June 9-10 were reserved for Workshops and Doctoral Consortium, and June 11-13 for 28 paper sessions. Pictorials are not in separate sessions; they are treated the same way as Full Papers. The 11th of June became an Experience Night of Demos, PWiPs, and a small design exhibition, which illuminated interaction design in Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta. As extra, we organized a postconference trip to a few technology companies in Shenzhen, China.

  • 46.
    Nouri, Jalal
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Characterizing learning mediated by mobile technologies: a cultural-historical activity theoretical analysis2015In: IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies, ISSN 1939-1382, E-ISSN 1939-1382, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 357-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile technologies have not yet triggered the knowledge revolution in schools anticipated, in particular, by the telecommunications industry. On the contrary, mobile technologies remain extensively used outside the frontiers of formal education. The reasons for this are many and varied. In this paper, we concentrate on those associated with the prevalent methodological weakness in the study of innovative educational interventions with mobile technologies. In this context, the paper investigates the following question: what is the potential of second-generation cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT) for characterizing learning activities mediated by mobile technologies? To this end, an empirical study was designed with the goal of examining five small groups of students (fifth grade, age 12) who were using mobile devices in authentic educational settings, within a natural science inquiry-based learning activity outdoors. Second-generation CHAT was operationalized as an analytical and dialectic methodological framework for understanding learning activities mediated by mobile devices. The study contributes a characterization of mobile learning and identification of constraints and transformations introduced by mobile technology into students’ tasks.

  • 47.
    Nouri, Jalal
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Pekplattor, undervisning och lärande2017In: Didaktik i omvandlingens tid: text, representation, design / [ed] Eva Insulander, Susanne Kjällander, Fredrik Lindstrand, Anna Åkerfeldt, Stockholm: Liber, 2017, p. 150-157Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Nouri, Jalal
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    When Teaching Practices Meet Tablets’ Affordances: Insights on the Materiality of Learning2016In: Adaptive and Adaptable Learning: Proceedings / [ed] Katrien Verbert, Mike Sharples, Tomaž Klobučar, Springer, 2016, p. 179-192Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on tablets in schools is currently dominated by the effects these devices have on our children’s learning. Little has yet been said about how these devices contribute and participate in established school practices. This study delves into the questions of what do tablet-mediated teaching practices look like in Swedish schools and how are these practices valued by teachers? We collected data in four Swedish schools that were part of the one-to-one program financed by their municipalities. We apply qualitative and quantitative analysis methods on 22 deep interviews, 20 classrooms observations and 30 teachers’ responses to an online survey. The study identifies a set of tablet-mediated teaching practices that lead to a deeper understanding of how affordances of media tablets configure contemporary forms of learning.

  • 49.
    Nouri, Jalal
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Eliasson, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Exploring the challenges of supporting collaborative mobile learning2011In: International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning, ISSN 1941-8647, E-ISSN 1941-8655, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 70-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mobile technology opens up opportunities for collaborative learning in otherwise remote contexts outside the classroom. A successful realization of these opportunities relies, however, on mobile learning activities providing adequate collaboration structures. This article presents an empirical study aimed at examining the role played by mobile devices, teachers and task structures as a means for collaborative learning in geometry. The study focused on the analysis of the nature of collaboration that unfolded when students measured areas outdoors in the field. The analysis of the mobile learning activity was conducted from an Activity theory perspective. The findings obtained indicate that the collaboration observed may be impaired if: 1) the functionalities needed for collaborative problem-solving are asymmetrically distributed on a number of mobile devices; 2) task-related information is not accessible to all learners; 3) the task structure is not sufficiently complex; 4) teacher scaffolding is too readily available; and 5) necessary collaborative skills are not developed.

  • 50.
    Nouri, Jalal
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Rossitto, Chiara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ramberg, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Learning with or without mobile devices? A comparison of traditional school field trips and inquiry-based mobile learning activities2014In: Research and Practice in Technology Enhanced Learning, ISSN 1793-7078, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 241-262Article in journal (Refereed)
12 1 - 50 of 61
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