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  • 1.
    Araujo, Sandra Gil
    et al.
    Instituto de Investigaciones Gino Germani, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de Buenos Aires.
    González, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Migraciones, género y trabajo en España: El tránsito obligado de las trabajadoras inmigrantes por el empleo de hogar2012In: Mora, ISSN 1853-001X, Vol. 18, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several researches have shown the importance of domestic work as a main sector of inclusion for migrant women in Spain, mainly during first years of immigration, regardless of their educational level. This concentration, far from responding to labor trajectories of these workers, is the result of the articulation of several variables within the reception context (immigration policies, employment policies, gender relations, labor market characteristics, ideas on domestic work, etc.) and the ways in which migrant families organize productive and reproductive work. In this case, this paper aims to analyze the variables which have influenced the feminization process of migration towards Spain and its connection with the importance of domestic work as the main sector of labor insertion for non-EU migrant women. Afterwards, we summarize some statistical data, and moreover therefore we present the results of an exploratory fieldwork with domestic workers in an irregular situation in Madrid, paying attention to working conditions, relations with employers, gender relations, migration projects, family life and ideas on care work in origin and destination.

  • 2. Gil Araujo, Sandra
    et al.
    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    International migration, public policies and domestic work Latin American migrant women in the Spanish domestic work sector2014In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, E-ISSN 1879-243X, Vol. 46, p. 13-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the Spanish case, in this article we explore the connection between migration policies, family policies, gender regimes and the insertion of Latin American migrant women into the domestic work sector. Over the first decade of the twenty-first century, Latin America became the main region of origin of migrants who had settled in Spain, being women the first link in these migration chains. The main factors that have affected the configuration of this feminization are linked to migration policies and patterns of migration, the features of the welfare state, the characteristics of the labor market and the way in which gender organizes and stratifies migration and domestic work. The achievement of national middle class women's rights to conciliate their professional and family life through outsourcing domestic work to non-national women also brings with it a deep inequality in terms of citizenship.

  • 3.
    González Fernández, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Globally Interdependent Households: Irregular Migrants Employed in Domestic and Care Work in Spain2013In: Irregular Migrant Domestic Workers in Europe: Who Cares? / [ed] Anna Triandafyllidou, Farnham: Ashgate, 2013, p. 187-208Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    González, Tania
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Gil Araujo, Sandra
    Montañés Sánchez, Virginia
    Política migratoria y derechos humanos en el Mediterráneo español: El impacto del control migratorio en los tránsitos de la migración africana hacia Europa2013In: Revista de Derecho Migratorio y Extranjería, ISSN 1695-3509, no 33, p. 245-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the entrance of Spain into the EU, the Mediterranean became the southern border of Europe and a focal point of the migratory pressure from Africa to Europe. Since then, the fight against irregular immigration, the increased surveillance and migration control, and the cooperation with countries of migration transit and origin have become core elements of the Spanish migration policy. The imposition of visas to African countries, the border control, the reinforcement of the fence in Ceuta and Melilla, the Frontex development, EUROSUR, SIVE, the Seahorse Project, the return agreements, the joint surveillance patrols at the Atlantic and the Mediterranean, and the inclusion of migration as a theme in Spanish external relations with emigration countries are instruments of externalization and Europeanization of Spanish migration policy.In this article, we focus our attention on the effects of migration control on the Spanish maritime border on the transit of migrants coming from Africa. The experiences of migrants who arrived irregularly in the Andalusian coast between 2010 and 2011 are taken as a case study. In particular, we are interested in exploring the violation offundamental rights throughout the different stages that make up the migration process: starting at the place of origin and the journey experience on land, the situation of migrants at sea, the interception of vessels, landing and retention. We will discuss in more detail the processes of identification, treatment, and protection of particularly vulnerable groups, as well as the gender relations that are embedded within these practices.

  • 5.
    González-Fernández, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Baldassar, Loretta and Merla, Laura (eds.) (2014). Transnational Families, Migration and the Circulation of Care. Understanding Mobility and Absence in Family Life. London and New York: Routledge2014In: Papeles del CEIC, ISSN 1695-6494, Vol. 2, p. 1-8Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    González-Fernández, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Entre nodos y nudos: ambivalencias emocionales en la migración transnacional: Una aproximación etnográfica a las emociones a partir de familias transnacionales entre Bolivia y España2016In: Odisea. Revista de Estudios Migratorios, ISSN 2408-445X, no 3, p. 99-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork carried out in Bolivia and Spain, this article explores the reconfiguration of family relations maintained by middle-aged migrant women in a context of transnational migration. Indeed, transnational migration triggers contradictory feelings for those leaving and for those who stay behind. The individuals interviewed repeatedly express mixed feelings of guilt, pride, sadness and satisfaction, often interwoven with meaningful silences, demands, and expectations. In this particular instance, the aim is to visibilize the emotional dimension inherent in family relations at a distance to demonstrate how migration is also affected by the weight of care responsibilities, the family life course, gender roles, or intergenerational relations.

  • 7.
    González-Fernández, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Feeling Across Distance: Transnational Migration, Emotions, and Family Life Between Bolivia and Spain2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What are the relational dynamics of family life as it is lived across vast distances and over time? What underpins these relations, practices, and experiences of being apart and yet together? Based on a long-term multi-sited fieldwork carried out in Spain and Bolivia from 2013 to 2015, this study sets out to address these questions by investigating caring practices, mediated connections, (non)material exchanges, and lived experiences of “doing” and “feeling” family across borders. It conveys the story of ten families divided between Madrid and the Bolivian urban areas of Cochabamba, Sucre, and Santa Cruz de la Sierra. Taking as a point of departure the encounters with middle-aged women who migrated to Spain in the early 2000s, the thesis moves back and forth between “here” and “there” to provide a polyphonic account of family relationships as they are sustained, enacted, and experienced by both those who leave and those who stay. It does so by exploring the transnational provision of care, the routines of keeping in touch, the exchange of remittances and material goods, as well as the interplay of these practices with the management of emotions and the circulation of affects. The term “affective maps” is employed here as a concept to capture the myriad of relatives taking part in these connections, in that it points out how these are strongly interdependent relationships through which people have the capacity to affect and to be affected by one another across distance. More specifically, this study demonstrates how the various ways of dealing with transnational family life are constantly shaped by migration regimes, restrictive policies, and global inequalities, on the one hand, and by power social relations, gender and generational roles, and life-course stages, on the other. To illuminate the dynamics at play, the notion of “feel-work” is introduced as a tuned-in ethnographic practice that simultaneously engages the body and the mind, reasoning and feeling. This study is thus a multi-sited ethnography contributing further knowledge into emotions and affects in human mobility, while it consistently uses emotions and affects as methodological and epistemological tools. The thesis argues that family members recreate a sense of “closeness” and maintain their emotional connection despite not being physically together nor seeing each other over long periods of absence. Ultimately, in grappling with the affective dimension of family relationships in the distinct context of current Bolivia-to-Spain migration, this thesis aims to shed some light on the emotional and the corporeal as constitutive aspects of the ethnographic endeavor.

1 - 7 of 7
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