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  • 1. Bowen, Kathryn J.
    et al.
    Cradock-Henry, Nicholas A.
    Koch, Florian
    Patterson, James
    Häyhä, Tiina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Vogt, Jess
    Barbi, Fabiana
    Implementing the Sustainable Development Goals: towards addressing three key governance challenges-collective action, trade-offs, and accountability2017In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 26-27, p. 90-96Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Realising the aspirations of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to reduce inequality, limit ecological damage, and secure resilient livelihoods is a grand challenge for sustainability science, civil society and government. We identify three key governance challenges that are central for implementing the SDGs: (i) cultivating collective action by creating inclusive decision spaces for stakeholder interaction across multiple sectors and scales; (ii) making difficult trade-offs, focusing on equity, justice and fairness; and (iii) ensuring mechanisms exist to hold societal actors to account regarding decision-making, investment, action, and outcomes. The paper explains each of these three governance challenges, identifying possible avenues for addressing them, and highlights the importance of interlinkages between the three challenges.

  • 2. Bruckner, Martin
    et al.
    Häyhä, Tiina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Austria.
    Giljum, Stefan
    Maus, Victor
    Fischer, Günther
    Tramberend, Sylvia
    Börner, Jan
    Quantifying the global cropland footprint of the European Union's non-food bioeconomy2019In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9326, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 14, no 4, article id 045011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A rapidly growing share of global agricultural areas is devoted to the production of biomass for non-food purposes. The expanding non-food bioeconomy can have far-reaching social and ecological implications; yet, the non-food sector has attained little attention in land footprint studies. This paper provides the first assessment of the global cropland footprint of non-food products of the European Union (EU), a globally important region regarding its expanding bio-based economy. We apply a novel hybrid land flow accounting model, combining the biophysical trade model LANDFLOW with the multi-regional input-output model EXIOBASE. The developed hybrid approach improves the level of product and country detail, while comprehensively covering all global supply chains from agricultural production to final consumption, including highly processed products, such as many non-food products. The results highlight the EU's role as a major processing and the biggest consuming region of cropland-based non-food products, while at the same time relying heavily on imports. Two thirds of the cropland required to satisfy the EU's non-food biomass consumption are located in other world regions, particularly in China, the US and Indonesia, giving rise to potential impacts on distant ecosystems. With almost 39% in 2010, oilseeds used to produce for example biofuels, detergents and polymers represented the dominant share of the EU's non-food cropland demand. Traditional non-food biomass uses, such as fibre crops for textiles and animal hides and skins for leather products, also contributed notably (22%). Our findings suggest that if the EU Bioeconomy Strategy is to support global sustainable development, a detailed monitoring of land use displacement and spillover effects is decisive for targeted and effective EU policy making.

  • 3.
    Downing, Andrea S.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Bhowmik, Avit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Collste, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Université Clermont Auvergne, France.
    Cornell, Sarah E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Donges, Jonathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany.
    Fetzer, Ingo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Häyhä, Tiina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Austria.
    Hinton, Jennifer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Université Clermont Auvergne, France.
    Lade, Steven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Australian National University, Australia.
    Mooij, Wolf M.
    Matching scope, purpose and uses of planetary boundaries science2019In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9326, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 14, no 7, article id 073005Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Planetary Boundaries concept (PBc) has emerged as a key global sustainability concept in international sustainable development arenas. Initially presented as an agenda for global sustainability research, it now shows potential for sustainability governance. Weuse the fact that it is widely cited in scientific literature (>3500 citations) and an extensively studied concept to analyse how it has been used and developed since its first publication. Design: From the literature that cites the PBc, we select those articles that have the terms 'planetary boundaries' or 'safe operating space' in either title, abstract or keywords. Weassume that this literature substantively engages with and develops the PBc. Results: Wefind that 6% of the citing literature engages with the concept. Within this fraction of the literature we distinguish commentaries-that discuss the context and challenges to implementing the PBc, articles that develop the core biogeophysical concept and articles that apply the concept by translating to sub-global scales and by adding a human component to it. Applied literature adds to the concept by explicitly including society through perspectives of impacts, needs, aspirations and behaviours. Discussion: Literature applying the concept does not yet include the more complex, diverse, cultural and behavioural facet of humanity that is implied in commentary literature. Wesuggest there is need for a positive framing of sustainability goals-as a Safe Operating Space rather than boundaries. Key scientific challenges include distinguishing generalised from context-specific knowledge, clarifying which processes are generalizable and which are scalable, and explicitly applying complex systems' knowledge in the application and development of the PBc. We envisage that opportunities to address these challenges will arise when more human social dimensions are integrated, as we learn to feed the global sustainability vision with a plurality of bottom-up realisations of sustainability.

  • 4.
    Häyhä, Tiina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Parthenope University Naples, Italy.
    Franzese, Pier Paolo
    Ecosystem services assessment: A review under an ecological-economic and systems perspective2014In: Ecological Modelling, ISSN 0304-3800, E-ISSN 1872-7026, Vol. 289, p. 124-132Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A comprehensive understanding of interlinked ecological-economic systems requires integration of different theoretical frameworks and assessment methods. This paper reviews the main definitions, classifications, and methodological approaches used to identify, assess, and value stocks of natural capital and flows of ecosystem services. A synthesis of the major developments in the field of ecosystem services assessment is provided and the main future challenges are outlined. The notion of value in relation to natural capital and ecosystem services is discussed exploring different economic and ecological approaches. We then propose a conceptual framework integrating environmental accounting and ecosystem services assessment to highlight three main possible windows of attention to be investigated when focusing on ecosystem services provision and exploitation: (1) sustained economic and environmental costs, (2) received benefits, and (3) generated impacts. Finally, we conclude that such an ecological-economic and systems perspective to ecosystem services assessment could play an important role in investigating the interplay between ecological and socio-economic systems, allowing a broader and more comprehensive understanding of the benefits gained from ecosystems and the costs due to their exploitation.

  • 5.
    Häyhä, Tiina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Parthenope University of Naples, Italy.
    Franzese, Pier Paolo
    Paletto, Alessandro
    Fath, Brian D.
    Assessing, valuing, and mapping ecosystem services in Alpine forests2015In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 14, p. 12-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forests support human economy and well-being with multiple ecosystem services. In this paper, the ecosystem services generated in a mountainous forest area in North Italy were assessed in biophysical and monetary units. GIS was used to analyze and visualize the distribution and provision of different services. The assessment of ecosystem services in biophysical units was an important step to investigate ecosystem functions and actual service Bows supporting socio-ecological systems. The Total Economic Value (TEV) of all the investigated ecosystem services was about 33 M(sic)/yr, corresponding to 820 (sic)/ha/yr. The provisioning services represented 40% of the TEV while the regulating and cultural services were 49% and 11%. The service of hydrogeological protection, particularly important in areas characterized by a high risk of avalanches and landslides, showed a major importance among the regulating services (81%) and within the TEV (40%). Results from mapping ecosystem services were useful in identifying and visualizing priority areas for different services, as well as exploring trade-offs and synergies between services. Finally, we argue that while a biophysical perspective can ensure a solid accounting base, a comprehensive economic valuation of all categories of forest ecosystem services can facilitate communication of their importance to policy makers.

  • 6.
    Häyhä, Tiina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, The Netherlands.
    Lucas, Paul L.
    van Vuuren, Detlef P.
    Cornell, Sarah E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hoff, Holger
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Environment Institute. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany.
    From Planetary Boundaries to national fair shares of the global safe operating space - How can the scales be bridged?2016In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 40, p. 60-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The planetary boundaries framework proposes quantitative global limits to the anthropogenic perturbation of crucial Earth system processes, and thus marks out a planetary safe operating space for human activities. Yet, decisions regarding resource use and emissions are mostly made at less aggregated scales, by national and sub-national governments, businesses, and other local actors. To operationalize the planetary boundaries concept, the boundaries need to be translated into and aligned with targets that are relevant at these decision-making scales. In this paper, we develop a framework that addresses the biophysical, socio-economic, and ethical dimensions of bridging across scales, to provide a consistently applicable approach for translating the planetary boundaries into national-level fair shares of Earth's safe operating space. We discuss our findings in the context of previous studies and their implications for future analyses and, policymaking. In this way, we link the planetary boundaries framework to widely-applied operational and policy concepts for more robust strong sustainability decision-making.

  • 7. van Vuuren, Detlef P.
    et al.
    Lucas, Paul L.
    Häyhä, Tiina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. PBL Netherland Environmental Assessment Agency, the Netherlands.
    Cornell, Sarah E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Stafford-Smith, Mark
    Horses for courses: analytical tools to explore planetary boundaries2016In: Earth System Dynamics, ISSN 2190-4979, E-ISSN 2190-4987, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 267-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for more integrated research on sustainable development and global environmental change. In this paper, we focus on the planetary boundaries framework to provide a systematic categorization of key research questions in relation to avoiding severe global environmental degradation. The four categories of key questions are those that relate to (1) the underlying processes and selection of key indicators for planetary boundaries, (2) understanding the impacts of environmental pressure and connections between different types of impacts, (3) better understanding of different response strategies to avoid further degradation, and (4) the available instruments to implement such strategies. Clearly, different categories of scientific disciplines and associated model types exist that can accommodate answering these questions. We identify the strength and weaknesses of different research areas in relation to the question categories, focusing specifically on different types of models. We discuss that more interdisciplinary research is need to increase our understanding by better linking human drivers and social and biophysical impacts. This requires better collaboration between relevant disciplines (associated with the model types), either by exchanging information or by fully linking or integrating them. As fully integrated models can become too complex, the appropriate type of model (the racehorse) should be applied for answering the target research question (the race course).

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