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  • 1.
    Billingsley, Sunnee
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Family Policy and Fertility Intentions in 21 European Countries2014In: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 428-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    European countries show substantial variation in family policy and in the extent to which policies support more traditional male-breadwinner or more gender egalitarian earner-carer family arrangements. Using data from the European Social Survey, the authors implemented multilevel models to analyze variation in fertility intentions of 16,000 men and women according to individual-level characteristics and family policy across 21 European countries. Both traditional and earner-carer family support generosity were positively related to first-birth intentions for men and women. In contrast, only earner-carer support maintains its positive relationship with second birth intentions. Family policy is not in general related to third and higher order parity intentions.

  • 2.
    Birnbaum, Simon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Palme, Joakim
    The Generational Welfare Contracts: Justice, Institutions and Outcomes2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This groundbreaking book brings together perspectives from political philosophy and comparative social policy to discuss generational justice. Contributing new insights about the preconditions for designing sustainable, inclusive policies for all of society, the authors expose the possibilities of supporting egalitarian principles in an aging society through balanced generational welfare contracts.

  • 3.
    Bygren, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Duvander, Ann-Zofie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Moulding Parents’ Childcare?: A Comparative Analysis of Paid Work and Time with Children in Different Family Policy Models2011In: Work-Life Balance in Europe: The Role of Job Quality / [ed] Drobnic, Sonja & Guillén, Ana, Palgrave Macmillan , 2011, p. 207-230Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bäckman, Olof
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Esser, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Korpi, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rojas, Yerko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sjöberg, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Comparative Indicators on Job Quality and Social Protection2009In: Quality of Work in the European Union: Concept, Data and Debates from a Transnational Perspective / [ed] Ana M. Guillén, Svenn-Åge Dahl, Brussels: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bäckman, Olof
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Att bekämpa barnfattigdom2011In: Utanförskap / [ed] Susanne Alm, Olof Bäckman, Anna Gavanas, Anders Nilsson, Stockholm: Dialogos Förlag, 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bäckman, Olof
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Combating Child Poverty? A Multilevel Assessment of Links Between Family Policy Institutions in 20 Countries2010In: Journal of Social Policy, ISSN 0047-2794, E-ISSN 1469-7823, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 275-296Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses the links between family policy institutions and poverty in households with pre-school children in 21 old and new welfare democracies. New institutional information which enables a separation of different family policy dimensions is combined with micro data from the Luxembourg Income Study. Through statistical multilevel modelling, individual- and country-level data are combined in a simultaneous analysis of their relationships to child poverty risks. The results show that family policy transfers are related to lower child poverty risks at the micro level. However, the mechanisms by which such transfers reduce poverty vary by type of family support. Support to dual-earner families operates by enabling both parents to work and raise market income, while support to more traditional family structures in some instances has a more direct effect on poverty risks. The analysis also renders support to the hypothesis that dual-earner transfers also alleviate poverty most effectively among single-mother households.

  • 7.
    Bäckman, Olof
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Men de äro rysligt dyra - barn, fattigdom och familjepolitik2012In: Framtider, ISSN 0281-0492, no 1/2012, p. 9-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8. Duvander, Ann-Zofie
    et al.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Thalberg, Sara
    Towards a new family-policy model2008In: Framtider: The Swedish Model, International edition, p. 18-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Esser, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Dubbla roller, dubbel stress? - familjepolitik, barn och stress i Sverige och andra välfärdsstater2007In: Halvvägs eller vilse? Om den nödvändiga balansen mellan föräldraskap och jobb, Premiss förlag, Stockholm , 2007, p. 19-38Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Esser, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Bäckman, Olof
    Institutet för framtidsstudier.
    Korpi, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rojas, Yerko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sjöberg, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Indicadores Comparativos Sobre Calidad En El Empleo Y Protection Social2009In: Calidad Del Trabajo En La Unión Europa. Concepto, Tensiones, Dimensiones / [ed] Guillén Rodríguez, A-M., Guitérrez Palacios, R., González Begega, S. (Eds.), Navarra: Thomson Civitas , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Esser, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sjöberg, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    A Framework for Comparing Social Protection in Developing and Developed Countries: The Example of Child Benefits2009In: International Social Security Review, ISSN 0020-871X, E-ISSN 1468-246X, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 91-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article outlines a conceptual and theoretical framework for improved comparative analysis of publicly provided social protection in developing countries, drawing on the research tradition of the study of longstanding welfare democracies. An important element of the proposed institutional approach is the establishment of comparable qualitative and quantitative indicators for social protection. The empirical example of child benefits indicates that differences between developed and developing countries should not be exaggerated, and that the prevalence of child benefits in sub-Saharan African and Latin American countries today resembles the inter-war period (1919-1938) situation in developed regions.

  • 12.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Barnbidraget i internationellt perspektiv: De kontanta och skattebaserade barnbidragens utveckling och koppling till barnfattigdom i Sverige och andra välfärdsdemokratier 1930-20002009Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Parental leave institutions in eighteen post-war welfare states2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study applies a macro-comparative and institutional approach to the study of incentive structures, determinants and outcomes of legislated parental leave benefits. Parental leave is defined as all benefits directed to mothers, fathers or both parents to facilitate parental childcare during the early post-natal period. By separating different aspects of such institutions, prospects are improved to analyze how paid parental leave shapes agency, actions and living conditions of parents and children. For this purpose, new institutional data on such benefits has been collected. The included countries are Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States.

    While cross-national differences were relatively small in the first post-war decades, divergences in parental leave institutions increased in the 1970s, when fathers also became recognized as potential carers in paid parental leave legislation. The inclusion of fathers follow along the lines of two separate dimensions of family policy, the first supporting a dual earner family type, and the latter one mainly preserving traditional family patterns. The dual earner strategy mainly includes earnings-related parental insurance programs, while the general family support strategy includes flat-rate parental leave benefits. Overall, parental leave policies show few signs of general policy retrenchment, but have rather expanded in most countries at the same time as cross-national institutional designs have diverged. Some countries, moreover, have undergone a gradual development towards a contradictory family policy model where both support to traditional family patterns and dual earner families are well developed.

    Analysing potential determinants behind the two different dimensions of parental leave in eighteen countries between 1970 and 1995, using pooled time-series cross-section regressions, shows that hypotheses derived from a power resources perspective, emphasizing the relative power of different political actors, appears most congruent with cross-national developments of parental leave programs. Left party incumbency as well as women’s representation in cabinets have positive correlations with the dual earner support dimension of paid leave, while confessional party and left party incumbency both are positively correlated to the cross-national development of general family support. Structural-economic and state-structural explanations overall receive little support.

    Multivariate analyses of paid parental leave, fertility and female labor force participation between 1970 and 1995 indicate that different institutions of parental leave have divergent relationships to the demographic outcomes. Parental leave in support of a dual earner family has a positive correlation with both fertility and female economic activity. Paid leave in support of the traditional family is negatively related to female labor force participation, while having a positive relationship to fertility. To the extent that this outcome reflects underlying motives of different political actors, paid leave institutions may be viewed as intervening variables. Parental leave benefits may, however, partly function as indicators on the broader social policy setting, including other public transfers and social services.

    Analyses on macro-relationships between first-year paid parental leave generosity and poverty among families with infants demonstrate a strong negative correlation. Disaggregating paid leave along the lines of the two dimensions (dual earner support and general family support) shows that earnings-related parental leave accounts for the main part of this relationship between policy and potential outcome. Controlling for other socio-political, demographic and structural-economic factors basically leaves earnings-related benefits as the only factor with a consistent significant and negative correlation with such distributive outcomes. The way policies structure these poverty risks has implications not only for the well-being of members in poor families, but may also shape the future agency of children growing up under such circumstances, as well as the agency of parents-to-be, whose childbearing decisions may be affected by potential future poverty risks.

    A central conclusion to be drawn from the study is that an institutional approach may greatly improve the understanding of how welfare states through programs of paid parental leave shape parental agency around paid and unpaid work as well as childbearing decisions. Thus, institutionalism and an actor-oriented perspective can be fruitfully combined in explaining development and outcomes of different family policy strategies, viewing social policy institutions as ‘intervening’ variables between causal factors and outcomes

  • 14.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Duvander, Ann-Zofie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Earner-Carer Model at the Cross-Roads: Reforms and Outcomes of Sweden’s Family Policy in Comparative Perspective2010In: International Journal of Health Services, ISSN 0020-7314, E-ISSN 1541-4469, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 373-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the 2006 election, the Swedish earner-carer model of family policy seems to have come to an important crossroads, and questions have been raised about the future course of policies. Will the prototypical earner-carer model in Sweden persist? The separate reforms in cash transfers, services, and tax systems in several respects seem to point in contradictory directions, simultaneously introducing new principles of social care. In this article, past and present reforms and potential outcomes of policies are discussed from an institutional and comparative perspective. Reviewing research on outcomes of earner-carer policies for gendered patterns of productive and reproductive work, class-based stratification, child well-being, fertility, and work-family conflict, the article also contributes to the discussion about future challenges for family policy institutions in Sweden and other advanced welfare states.

  • 15.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Estimating Post-Tax Social Insurance Benefits: Validity Problems in Comparative Analyses of Net Income Components from Household Income Data2002Report (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Höög, H
    The Fiscalization of Child Benefits in OECD Countries2012Report (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Höög, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    From Universalism to Selectivity: Old Wine in New Bottles for Child Benefits in Europe and Other Countries2013In: Minimum Income Protection in Flux / [ed] Marx, I, Nelson, K, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, p. 137-160Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current economic crisis has presented itself as a formidable challenge to the welfare states of Europe. It is more relevant than ever to ask: do existing minimum income protection schemes succeed in adequately protecting citizens, be it whether they are excluded from work, working, retired, or having children? Drawing on in-depth and up-to-date institutional data from across Europe and the US, this volume details the reality of minimum income protection policies over time. Including contributions from leading scholars in the field, each chapter provides a systematic cross-national analysis of minimum income protection policies, developing concrete policy guidance on an issue at the heart of the European debate.

  • 18.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Korpi, Walter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Palme, Joakim
    Social citizenship rights and social insurance replacement rate validity: pitfalls and possibilities2013In: Journal of European Public Policy, ISSN 1350-1763, E-ISSN 1466-4429, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 1251-1266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The comparative analysis of welfare states has been greatly advanced by rights-based measurements of social provisions. Social insurance replacement rates have figured prominently here. Apparently, there is considerable confusion about the validity of replacement rates and their comparability across different datasets. The purpose of this study is to outline a refined institutional perspective in the comparative analysis of welfare states focusing on the character of social citizenship rights. We show that social insurance replacement rates from different datasets differ in their underlying theoretical framework for policy analysis and therefore capture different aspects of how welfare states secure the livelihood of citizens in periods of work incapacity. Analysing validity solely on the basis of replacement rate point estimates is therefore misleading. We show that the close focus on social citizenship rights and programmatic design in the Social Citizenship Indicator Programme (SCIP) carries great potential for causal welfare state analysis.

  • 19.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Palme, Joakim
    Levels and targeting of social benefits in global perspective: combatting poverty through social policy. LIS working papers series - No. 647. Luxembourg: Luxembourg Income Study.2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates an old question that has re-emerged in social policy-making and in analyses of global social development: to what extent does targeting and size of social transfers matter for poverty? Using multilevel logistic regression and LIS income data for 40 middle- and high-income countries, we show that the size of transfer income has greater explanatory value for cross-country differences in poverty than the degree of targeting of transfer income. The results are remarkably robust in terms of estimated individual-level and country-level compositional and confounding factors.

  • 20.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Palme, Joakim
    Levels and targeting of social transfers: counteracting poverty in a global perspective2013In: Vietnam Social Sciences, ISSN 1013-4328, no 5, p. 20-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Plame, Joakim
    Social transfers and poverty in middle- and high-income countries – A global perspective2016In: Global Social Policy, ISSN 1468-0181, E-ISSN 1741-2803, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 22-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates an old question that has re-emerged in social policymaking and in analyses of global social development: to what extent does targeting and size of social transfers matter for poverty? Using multilevel logistic regression and Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg (LIS) income data for 40 middle- and high-income countries, we show that the size of transfer income has greater explanatory value for cross-country differences in poverty than the degree of targeting of transfer income. The results are remarkably robust in terms of estimated individual-level and country-level compositional and confounding factors.

  • 22.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sjöberg, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Decomposing the effect of social policies on population health and inequalities: An empirical example of unemployment benefits2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 635-642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The purpose of this study is to discuss and empirically contrast different conceptualizations and operationalizations of social policies in analysing health and educational differences in health cross-nationally. Methods: Country-level institutional and expenditure data on unemployment benefit schemes and individual-level data from the EU-SILC for 23 countries were used to analyse the association between unemployment benefits and self-assessed health for individuals with different educational attainment. Results: The analyses indicate that higher coverage rate (i.e. the proportion of the relevant population eligible for benefits) is associated with better self-related health among both low- and high-educated individuals, but is not linked to smaller educational differences in health. In contrast, replacement rate (i.e. the amount of benefits received) in isolation is not related to self-assessed health. However, in countries where coverage rates are high, higher replacement rates are associated with better health among both low- and high-educated individuals and smaller educational differences in health. Conclusions: Decomposing unemployment benefit programmes into two main dimensions – the proportion in the labour force covered by such programmes and the replacement rate received in case of unemployment – may present further insights into institutional mechanisms linking macro-level social policies to individual-level health outcomes.

  • 23.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sjöberg, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Multipla välfärdsproblem: Sverige i ett jämförande perspektiv2010In: Socialstyrelsen - Social Rapport 2010, socialstyrelsen , 2010Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sjöberg, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Unemployment insurance and deteriorating self-rated health in 23 European countries2014In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 68, no 7, p. 657-662Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The global financial crisis of 2008 is likely to have repercussions on public health in Europe, not least through escalating mass unemployment, fiscal austerity measures and inadequate social protection systems. The purpose of this study is to analyse the role of unemployment insurance for deteriorating self-rated health in the working age population at the onset of the fiscal crisis in Europe.

    Methods

    Multilevel logistic conditional change models linking institutional-level data on coverage and income replacement in unemployment insurance to individuallevel panel data on self-rated health in 23 European countries at two repeated occasions, 2006 and 2009.

    Results

    Unemployment insurance significantly reduces transitions into self-rated ill-health and, particularly, programme coverage is important in this respect. Unemployment insurance is also of relevance for the socioeconomic gradients of health at individual level, where programme coverage significantly reduces health risks attached to educational attainment.

    Conclusions

    Unemployment insurance mitigated adverse health effects both at individual and country-level during the financial crisis. Due to the centrality of programme coverage, reforms to unemployment insurance should focus on extending the number of insured people in the labour force.

  • 25.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sjöberg, Ola
    Palme, Joakim
    Sveriges socialförsäkringar i jämförande perspektiv: En institutionell analys av sjuk-, arbetsskade- och arbetslöshetsförsäkringarna i 18 OECD-länder 1930 till 20102012Report (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Norström, Thor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Family policy, economic development and infant mortality: a longitudinal comparative analysis2010In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 19, no Supplement s1, p. s89-s102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study, the impact of family policy legislation and economic development on infant mortality was estimated. Time series analyses indicate that economic growth decreased infant mortality in the earlier part of the 20th century, while the postwar period showed a zero or even a reversed correlation between economic development and child health. The results from fixed effects modelling of data for 18 welfare democracies for the period 1970–2000 are in line with the hypothesis that the more generous the earnings-related parental leave benefits, the lower the infant mortality.

  • 27.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sjöberg, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Social policy and health: transition countries in a comparative perspective2010In: International Journal of Social Welfare, ISSN 1369-6866, E-ISSN 1468-2397, Vol. 19, p. 60-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the development and design of unemployment insurance and family policy benefits and their links to health outcomes in Estonia, Poland, the Slovak Republic, Slovenia, the Czech Republic and Hungary from the mid-1990s. Comparing these six transition countries with long-standing welfare democracies reveals important similarities and differences in policy and health. Unemployment benefit schemes resemble corporatist schemes in important respects, however, with lower coverage and average benefits. Subjective wellbeing is also comparatively low among both employed and unemployed in the transition countries. Several transition countries have mixed family policy strategies that simultaneously support dual-earner families and traditional gender roles. One clear exception is Slovenia, which has a highly developed dual-earner support. Family policy generosity is related to lower rates of poverty, infant mortality and child injuries. The article demonstrates the fruitfulness of institutional analyses of the link between social policy and population health in a broader welfare state context.

  • 28.
    Fritzell, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Bacchus Hertzman, Jennie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Bäckman, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Borg, Ida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sweden: Increasing income inequalities and changing social relations2014In: Changing Inequalities and Societal Impacts in Rich Countries. Thirty Countries' Experiences / [ed] Brian Nolan, Wiemer Salverda, Daniele Checchi, Ive Marx, Abigail McKnight, István György Tóth, Herman G. van de Werfhorst, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From an all-time low around 1980, income inequality substantially increased, reflecting a strong rise in top incomes and income from capital, more recently also a widening gap between bottom and middle incomes. Behind this are the dual income tax system, established in the early 1990s, the introduction of earned income tax credits, and a diminished coverage of social insurance programmes, which widened the income gap between employed and non-employed during the 2000s. The benefit and tax systems became less redistributive and thereby contributed to increased income inequalities. Another important element is the deep recession in the early 1990s with skyrocketing unemployment and subsequent cutbacks in welfare provision. Income inequalities, however, increased first and foremost in the aftermath of the recession. The chapter finds no unambiguous trend in social, cultural, and political conditions corresponding to the increased inequalities. There is increased polarization for many indicators between different socio-economic groups.

  • 29.
    Korpi, Walter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Englund, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Women's Opportunities under Different Constellations of Family Policies in Western Countries: Inequality Tradeoffs Re-examined2011Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Korpi, Walter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Englund, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Women's Opportunities under Different Family Policy Constellations: Gender, Class, and Inequality Tradeoffs in Western Countries Re-examined2013In: Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State and Society, ISSN 1072-4745, E-ISSN 1468-2893, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores tradeoffs reflecting interaction effects between socioeconomic class and different types of family policies on gender inequalities in terms of agency and economic inequality in eighteen Organization for Economic and Cultural Development countries. We identify multiple dimensions in family policies, reflecting the extent to which legislation involves claim rights supporting mothers' paid work or supporting traditional homemaking. We use constellations of multidimensional policies in combination with multilevel analysis to examine effects on class selectivity of women into employment and glass ceilings with respect to women's access to top wages and managerial positions. Our results indicate that while major negative family policy effects for women with tertiary education are difficult to find in countries with well-developed policies supporting women's employment and work-family reconciliation, family policies clearly differ in the extent to which they improve opportunities for women without university education.

  • 31.
    Lundberg, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Åberg Yngwe, Monica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Kölegård Stjärne, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Elstad, Jon Ivar
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Kangas, Olli
    Norström, Thor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Palme, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Fritzell, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    The role of welfare state principles and generosity in social policy programmes for public health: an international comparative study2008In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 372, no 9650, p. 1633-1640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Background Many important social determinants of health are also the focus for social policies. Welfare states contribute to the resources available for their citizens through cash transfer programmes and subsidised services. Although all rich nations have welfare programmes, there are clear cross-national differences with respect to their design and generosity These differences are evident in national variations in poverty rates, especially among children and elderly people. We investigated to what extent variations in family and pension policies are linked to infant mortality and old-age excess mortality. Methods Infant mortality rates and old-age excess mortality rates were analysed in relation to social policy characteristics and generosity. We did pooled cross-sectional time-series analyses of 18 OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries during the period 1970-2000 for family policies and 1950-2000 for pension policies. Findings Increased generosity in family policies that support dual-earner families is linked with lower infant mortality rates, whereas the generosity in family policies that support more traditional families with gainfully employed men and homemaking women is not. An increase by one percentage point in dual-earner support lowers infant mortality by 0.04 deaths per 1000 births. Generosity in basic security type of pensions is linked to lower old-age excess mortality, whereas the generosity of earnings-related income security pensions is not. An increase by one percentage point in basic security pensions is associated with a decrease in the old age excess mortality by 0.02 for men as well as for women. Interpretation The ways in which social policies are designed, as well as their generosity, are important for health because of the increase in resources that social policies entail. Hence, social policies are of major importance for how we can tackle the social determinants of health.

  • 32.
    Wesolowski, Katharina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Family policies and fertility: Examining the link between family policy institutions and fertility rates in 33 countries 1995-20112018In: International journal of sociology and social policy, ISSN 0144-333X, E-ISSN 1758-6720, Vol. 38, no 11, p. 1057-1070Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze the link between two different family policy dimensions – one supporting the combination of work and parenthood and one supporting stay-at-home mothers – and fertility rates between 1995 and 2011 in 33 industrialized countries. Design/methodology/approach: Total fertility rates were regressed on the two policy dimensions, earner–carer support and traditional–family support, using pooled time-series analysis with country fixed effects and stepwise control for female labor force participation, unemployment rates and GDP. Findings: The analyses show that earner–carer support is linked to higher fertility, while traditional–family support is not. Also, higher female labor force participation is linked to higher fertility before GDP is included. Conversely, higher unemployment is correlated with lower fertility levels. Sensitivity analyses with and without day care enrollment on a smaller set of countries show no influence of day care on the results for family policy. Originality/value: The results give weight to the argument that family policies supporting the combination of work and parenthood could increase fertility in low-fertility countries, probably mediated in part by female labor force participation. Earnings-related earner–carer support incentivizes women to enter the labor force before parenthood and to return to work after time off with their newborn child, thus supporting a combination of work and parenthood.

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