Change search
Refine search result
1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Amoudruz, Petra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Holmlund, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Saghafian-Hedengren, Shanie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Nilsson, Caroline
    Sverremark-Ekström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Impaired Toll-like receptor 2 signaling in monocytes from 5-year-old allergic children2009In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 155, no 3, p. 387-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relative composition of the two major monocytic subsets CD14+CD16− and CD14+CD16+ is altered in some allergic diseases. These two subsets display different patterns of Toll-like receptor levels, which could have implications for activation of innate immunity leading to reduced immunoglobulin E-specific adaptive immune responses. This study aimed to investigate if allergic status at the age of 5 years is linked to differences in monocytic subset composition and their Toll-like receptor levels, and further, to determine if Toll-like receptor regulation and cytokine production upon microbial stimuli is influenced by the allergic phenotype. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 5-year-old allergic and non-allergic children were stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan. Cells were analysed with flow cytometry for expression of CD14, Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 and p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The release of cytokines and chemokines [tumour necrosis factor, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70] into culture supernatants was measured with cytometric bead array. For unstimulated cells there were no differences in frequency of the monocytic subsets or their Toll-like receptor levels between allergic and non-allergic children. However, monocytes from allergic children had a significantly lower up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 2 upon peptidoglycan stimulation. Further, monocytes from allergic children had a higher spontaneous production of IL-6, but there were no differences between the two groups regarding p38-MAPK activity or cytokine and chemokine production upon stimulation. The allergic subjects in this study have a monocytic population that seems to display a hyporesponsive state as implicated by impaired regulation of Toll-like receptor 2 upon peptidoglycan stimulation.

  • 2.
    Amoudruz, Petra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Holmlund, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Schollin, Jens
    Sverremark-Ekström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Montgomery, Scott M
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Maternal country of birth and previous pregnancies are associated with breast milk characteristics2009In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 19-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Populations in high infectious exposure countries are at low risk of some immune-mediated diseases such as Crohn’s disease and allergy. This low risk is maintained upon immigration to an industrialized country, but the offspring of such immigrants have a higher immune-mediated disease risk than the indigenous population. We hypothesize that early life exposures in a developing country shape the maternal immune system, which could have implications for the offspring born in a developed country with a low infectious load. The aim of this study was to investigate if exposures in childhood (indicated by country of origin) and subsequent exposures influence immunologic characteristics relevant to stimulation of offspring. Breast milk components among 64 mothers resident in Sweden, 32 of whom immigrated from a developing country, were examined using the ELISA and Cytometric Bead Array methods. Immigrants from a developing country had statistically significantly higher levels of breast milk interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8 and transforming growth factor-β1. A larger number of previous pregnancies were associated with down-regulation of several substances, statistically significant for soluble CD14 and IL-8. The results suggest that maternal country of birth may influence adult immune characteristics, potentially relevant to disease risk in offspring. Such a mechanism may explain the higher immune-mediated disease risk among children of migrants from a developing to developed country. Older siblings may influence disease risk through the action of previous pregnancies on maternal immune characteristics.

  • 3.
    Björkander, Sofia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Bremme, K.
    Persson, Jan-Olov
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    van Vollenhoven, R. F.
    Sverremark-Ekström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Holmlund, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Pregnancy-associated inflammatory markers are elevated in pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus2012In: Cytokine, ISSN 1043-4666, E-ISSN 1096-0023, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 392-399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During normal pregnancy a dampening in T cell-mediated immunity is compensated by an increased pro-inflammatory activity. Likewise, the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with inflammatory activity and pregnancy complications occur frequently in women with SLE. The aim of this study was to elucidate how SLE influences the chemokine and cytokine balance during and after pregnancy. Blood samples were taken from pregnant women with or without SLE at second and third trimester and 8-12 weeks after pregnancy. Cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1 beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-17A, TNF, IFN-gamma and IFN-alpha), chemokines (CXCL8/IL-8, CXCL9/MIG, CXCL10/IP-10, CCL2/MCP-1, CCL5/RANTES and CCL17/TARC), soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) and soluble glycoprotein 130 (gp130) were measured in serum using cytometric bead array (CBA) or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Women with SLE had increased serum concentrations of CXCL8/IL-8, CXCL9/MIG, CXCL10/IP-10 and IL-10 compared to controls both during and after pregnancy. Further, when dividing the patients based on disease activity, the women with active disease had the highest levels. Importantly, women with SLE seemed to respond to pregnancy in a similar way as controls, since the changes of cytokines and chemokines over the course of pregnancy were similar but with overall higher levels in the patient group. In conclusion, changes in pro- and anti-inflammatory serum components during pregnancy in women with SLE, occurring on top of already more pro-inflammatory levels, might increase their risk for pregnancy complications and flares. How their children are affected by this heightened inflammatory milieu during pregnancy needs further investigation.

  • 4.
    Björkander, Sofia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Heidari-Hamedani, Ghazal
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Bremme, K.
    Gunnarsson, I.
    Holmlund, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Peripheral Monocyte Expression of the Chemokine Receptors CCR2, CCR5 and CXCR3 is Altered at Parturition in Healthy Women and in Women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 77, no 3, p. 200-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Monocytes are precursors of macrophages and recruited to the uterus throughout pregnancy to perform important immunological functions. In this study, we hypothesized that pregnant women have reduced peripheral monocyte expression of chemokine receptors and alterations in PBMC responses to microbial stimuli as an adaption to pregnancy and that these changes are less pronounced in women with autoimmunity. We therefore investigated the chemokine receptor expression, migratory behaviour and responses to microbial stimulation of peripheral monocytes from pregnant women at parturition (n=13) and from non-pregnant women (n=9). In addition, we compared healthy pregnant women with women suffering from SLE (n=5), a condition with pronounced systemic inflammation increasing the risk for pregnancy complications. We demonstrate that peripheral monocytes are affected by pregnancy with reduced percentages of CCR2+, CCR5+ and CXCR3+ monocytes of both classical (CD16) and inflammatory (CD16+) subsets and that the trophoblast-secreted chemokine CCL2/MCP-1 recruited monocytes of both subsets in vitro. Further, PBMCs from pregnant women had a divergent response to microbial stimulation with lower CCL5/RANTES and higher CCL2/MCP-1 secretion compared with non-pregnant women. In addition, pregnant women had lower basal PBMC-secretion of CCL5/RANTES and higher basal secretion of IL-10 and CCL2/MCP-1. Interestingly, the women with SLE responded similar to pregnancy as did healthy women with lower percentages of CCR2+, CCR5+ and CXCR3+ monocytes. However, they had increased expression of CCR5 on CD16+ monocytes and heightened PBMC-secretion of CCL5/RANTES. In conclusion, our data indicate that monocyte chemokine receptor expression and the chemokine milieu during pregnancy are tightly regulated to support pregnancy.

  • 5.
    Björkander, Sophia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Hell, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Johansson, Maria A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Mata Forsberg, Manuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Lasaviciute, Gintare
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Roos, Stefan
    Holmlund, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Sverremark-Ekström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Staphylococcus aureus-derived factors induce IL-10, IFN-gamma and IL-17A-expressing FOXP3(+)CD161(+) T-helper cells in a partly monocyte-dependent manner2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 22083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a human pathogen as well as a frequent colonizer of skin and mucosa. This bacterium potently activates conventional T-cells through superantigens and it is suggested to induce T-cell cytokine-production as well as to promote a regulatory phenotype in T-cells in order to avoid clearance. This study aimed to investigate how S. aureus impacts the production of regulatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines and the expression of CD161 and HELIOS by peripheral CD4(+)FOXP3(+) T-cells. Stimulation of PBMC with S. aureus 161:2-cell free supernatant (CFS) induced expression of IL-10, IFN-gamma and IL-17A in FOXP3(+) cells. Further, CD161 and HELIOS separated the FOXP3(+) cells into four distinct populations regarding cytokine-expression. Monocyte-depletion decreased S. aureus 161:2-induced activation of FOXP3(+) cells while pre-stimulation of purified monocytes with S. aureus 161:2-CFS and subsequent co-culture with autologous monocyte-depleted PBMC was sufficient to mediate activation of FOXP3(+) cells. Together, these data show that S. aureus potently induces FOXP3(+) cells and promotes a diverse phenotype with expression of regulatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines connected to increased CD161-expression. This could indicate potent regulation or a contribution of FOXP3(+) cells to inflammation and repression of immune-suppression upon encounter with S. aureus.

  • 6.
    Haileselassie, Yeneneh
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Johansson, Maria A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Zimmer, Christine L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Björkander, Sophia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Petursdottir, Dagbjort H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Dicksved, Johan
    Petersson, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Persson, Jan-Olov
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics.
    Fernández, Carmen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Roos, Stefan
    Holmlund, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Sverremark-Ekström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Lactobacilli Regulate Staphylococcus aureus 161:2-Induced Pro-Inflammatory T-Cell Responses In Vitro2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There seems to be a correlation between early gut microbiota composition and postnatal immune development. Alteration in the microbial composition early in life has been associated with immune mediated diseases, such as autoimmunity and allergy. We have previously observed associations between the presence of lactobacilli and Staphylococcus (S.) aureus in the early-life gut microbiota, cytokine responses and allergy development in children. Consistent with the objective to understand how bacteria modulate the cytokine response of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) lines and immune cells, we exposed IEC lines (HT29, SW480) to UV-killed bacteria and/or culture supernatants (-sn) from seven Lactobacillus strains and three S. aureus strains, while peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) from healthy donors were stimulated by bacteria-sn or with bacteria conditioned IEC-sn. Although the overall IEC response to bacterial exposure was characterized by limited sets of cytokine and chemokine production, S. aureus 161: 2-sn induced an inflammatory response in the IEC, characterized by CXCL1/GROa and CXCL8/IL-8 production, partly in a MyD88-dependent manner. UV-killed bacteria did not induce a response in the IEC line, and a combination of both UV-killed bacteria and the bacteria-sn had no additive effect to that of the supernatant alone. In PBMC, most of the Lactobacillus-sn and S. aureus-sn strains were able to induce a wide array of cytokines, but only S. aureus-sn induced the T-cell associated cytokines IL-2, IL-17 and IFN-gamma, independently of IEC-produced factors, and induced up regulation of CTLA-4 expression and IL-10 production by T-regulatory cells. Notably, S. aureus-sn-induced T-cell production of IFN-gamma and IL-17 was down regulated by the simultaneous presence of any of the different Lactobacillus strains, while the IEC CXCL8/IL-8 response was unaltered. Thus these studies present a possible role for lactobacilli in induction of immune cell regulation, although the mechanisms need to be further elucidated.

  • 7.
    Holmlund, U.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Amoudruz, P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Johansson, M. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Haileselassie, Y.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Ongoiba, A.
    Kayentao, K.
    Traoré, B.
    Doumbo, S.
    Schollin, J.
    Doumbo, O.
    Montgomery, S. M.
    Sverremark-Ekström, E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute , Immunology.
    Maternal country of origin, breast milk characteristics and potential influences on immunity in offspring2010In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 162, no 3, p. 500-509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breast milk contains pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines with potential to influence immunological maturation in the child. We have shown previously that country of birth is associated with the cytokine/chemokine profile of breast milk. In this study we have investigated how these differences in breast milk affect the cellular response of cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) and intestinal epithelial cells (IECs, cell line HT-29) to microbial challenge. Ninety-five women were included: 30 from Mali in West Africa, 32 Swedish immigrants and 33 native Swedish women. CBMCs or IECs were stimulated in vitro with breast milk, alone or in combination with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or peptidoglycan (PGN). Breast milk in general abrogated the LPS-induced down-regulation of surface CD14 and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 expression on CB monocytes, while inhibiting the PGN-induced TLR-2 up-regulation. However, breast milk from immigrant women together with LPS induced a lower CBMC release of interleukin (IL)-6 (P = 0·034) and CXCL-8/IL-8 (P = 0·037) compared with breast milk from Swedish women, while breast milk from Swedish women and Mali women tended to increase the response. The same pattern of CXCL-8/IL-8 release could be seen after stimulation of IECs (HT-29). The lower CBMC and IEC (HT-29) responses to microbial compounds by breast milk from immigrant women could be explained by the fact that breast milk from the immigrant group showed a divergent pro- and anti-inflammatory content for CXCL-8/IL-8, transforming growth factor-β1 and soluble CD14, compared to the other two groups of women. This may have implications for maturation of their children's immune responses.

  • 8.
    Saghafian-Hedengren, S.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Holmlund, U.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Amoudruz, P.
    Nilsson, C.
    Sverremark-Ekström, E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Wenner-Gren Institute .
    Maternal allergy influences p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase activity upon microbial challenge in CD14+ monocytes from 2-year-old children2008In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 449-57Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Sohlberg, Ebba
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Saghafian-Hedengren, Shanie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Bachmayer, Nora
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Hamad, Rangeen Rafik
    Bremme, Katarina
    Holmlund, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Pre-Eclampsia Affects Cord Blood NK Cell Expression of Activation Receptors and Serum Cytokine Levels but Not CB Monocyte Characteristics2014In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 178-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ProblemMaternal immunopathology in pre-eclampsia is well studied; however, less is known regarding the immunological effects on the newborns. Increased inflammation and activation of immune cells at the fetal-maternal interface in pre-eclampsia could influence the neonatal immune compartment. Method of StudyMonocytes and natural killer (NK) cells from cord blood (CB) of children with pre-eclamptic or healthy mothers were analyzed by flow cytometry for surface markers and intracellular cytokines. In addition, serum cytokine profiles were investigated using ELISA or cytometric bead array. ResultsNeonates born to pre-eclamptic mothers had an inflammatory serum cytokine profile. While CB monocyte characteristics seemed unaffected, CB NK cells from pre-eclamptic pregnancies had higher NKp30, but borderline lower NKG2D expression. ConclusionIn utero inflammatory priming of neonatal innate immunity taking place in pre-eclamptic pregnancies might influence specific NK cell functions in newborns.

  • 10. Vinnars, Marie-Therese
    et al.
    Björk, Emma
    Nagaev, Ivan
    Ottander, Ulrika
    Bremme, Katarina
    Holmlund, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Sverremark-Ekström, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Enhanced Th1 and inflammatory mRNA responses upregulate NK cell cytotoxicity and NKG2D ligand expression in human pre-eclamptic placenta and target it for NK cell attack2018In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 80, no 1, article id e12969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ProblemPre-eclampsia (PE), a severe human pregnancy disorder, is associated with exaggerated systemic inflammation, enhanced cytokine production, and increased shedding of microvesicles leading to endothelial dysfunction, coagulopathy, and extensive placenta destruction. The cause of PE is still unclear. Evidence suggests that its origin lies in the placenta and that the maternal immune system is involved. A shift in cytokine production in PE pregnancy promotes NK cell activation, suggested to be important in PE pathogenesis. In line with this suggestion, we studied NK cell cytotoxicity in peripheral blood of PE patients and controls and the mRNA expression of cytokines and of the NKG2D receptor and its ligands MICA/B and ULBP1-3 in PE- and normal placenta. Method of studyThe cytotoxic capacity of peripheral blood NK cells was analyzed using K562 target cells. The cytokine mRNA profiles and the mRNA expression of the NKG2D receptor and its ligands MICA/B and ULBP 1-3 in PE placenta were assessed and compared to those in normal placenta using real-time quantitative RT-PCR. ResultsThe cytotoxicity of peripheral blood NK cells was upregulated in PE cases. Further, we found an enhanced inflammatory cytokine mRNA response combined with a dysregulated regulatory response and a significant mRNA overexpression of NKG2D receptor and its ligands MICA/B and ULBP in PE placenta. ConclusionThe destruction of chorionic villi observed in PE placenta might be conveyed by an enhanced local cytotoxic response through the NKG2D receptor-ligand pathway, which in turn might be promoted by an intense inflammatory response not counteracted by regulatory cytokine responses.

1 - 10 of 10
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf