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  • 1.
    Rajala, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Alessandro Launaro: Peasants and Slaves: The Rural Population of Roman Italy (200 BC to AD 100)2014In: Arctos: acta philologica fennica, ISSN 0570-734X, Vol. 47, p. 383-386Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Rajala, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Andrew Bevan & James Conolly. Mediterranean islands, fragile communities and persistent landscapes: Antikythera in long-term perspective2014In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 88, no 340, p. 676-677Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Rajala, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Biographies of tombs and the metaphorical representations of the Crustumini: Remembering the Dead project and the funerary excavations at Cisterna Grande at Crustumerium 2004-20082014In: Caeculus, ISSN 1782-4907, Vol. 8, p. 63-81Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Rajala, Ulla
    Cambridge University, UK.
    David Vogt, Rock Carvings in Østfold and Bohuslän, South Scandinavia: An Interpretation of Political and Economic Landscape. The Institutefor Comparative Research in Human Culture &Novus Press, Oslo 20112013In: Fennoscandia Archaeologica, ISSN 0781-7126, Vol. 30, p. 139-141Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Rajala, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    GIS and pre- and postcolonial inscriptions in the Ager Faliscus2015In: Archeologia e Calcolatori, ISSN 1120-6861, Vol. 26, p. 19-20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Rajala, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Introduction2015In: Archeologia e Calcolatori, ISSN 1120-6861, Vol. 26, p. 13-14Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Rajala, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Italic inscriptions and databases workshop (Rome, 23 September 2014)2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Rajala, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Justin St. P. Walsh: Consumerism in the Ancient World: Imports and Identity Construction. Routledge Monographs in Classical Studies. Routledge, New York – London 2014. ISBN 978-0-415- 89379-4 (hb). XVIII, 218 pp. USD 140, GBP 852016In: Arctos: acta philologica fennica, ISSN 0570-734X, Vol. 2015, no 43, p. 320-322Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Rajala, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Nested identities and mental distances: archaic burials in Latium Vetus2016In: Burial and social change in first-millennium BC Italy: approaching social agents: Gender, personhood and marginality / [ed] Elisa Perego, Rafael Scopacasa, Oxford & Philadelphia: Oxbow Books, 2016, p. 161-193Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Rajala, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Ocriculum (Otricoli, Umbria): An Archaeological Survey of the Roman Town2014In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 745-748Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Rajala, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History. University of Cambridge, UK.
    On the evidence for the rural Archaic and late Archaic sites from the Nepi survey: the character of the sites in the pre-Roman period2017In: Archeologia e storia a Nepi III / [ed] Stefano Francocci, Davide Ghaleb Editore , 2017, p. 27-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Rajala, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Pre-colonial Latin Colonies and the Transition to the Mid-republican Period in the Faliscan Area and South Etruria: Orientalizing, Archaic and Late Archaic Settlement and Funerary Evidence from the Nepi Survey2016In: Papers of The British School at Rome, ISSN 0068-2462, E-ISSN 2045-239X, Vol. 84, p. 1-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the survey evidence from the Orientalizing and Archaic settlement and funerary sites at Nepi (ancient Nepet), one of the first Latin colonies outside Latium adiectum. The comparison of its pre-Roman, pre-colonial developments to the Roman patterns from the Nepi Survey Project and the trends from other Latin colonies in southern Etruria allows the examination of the local effects of Roman colonialism. The evidence shows that Nepi seemed to develop as an independent city state in the Orientalizing period, peaked in the Archaic period and weakened before the capture of Veii in 396 bc, making it easier to defeat. Rural settlement all but disappeared afterwards with similar hiatus apparent at the sister colony at Sutri as well. In the third century bc the first few villas near the town appeared as a sign of the establishment of a Roman settlement pattern. The extensive ‘rural colonization’ at Nepi, similarly to Sutri and Cosa, started only in the second century bc when all southern Etruria had entered a colonial phase and could develop alongside Rome. Thus, Latin colonization disrupted earlier patterns and the colonies appear to have been originally outposts set up to secure new territory.

  • 13.
    Rajala, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Robert Garland: Wandering Greeks. The Ancient Greek Diaspora from the Age of Homer to the Death of Alexander the Great2015In: Arctos: acta philologica fennica, ISSN 0570-734X, Vol. 47, p. 512-513Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Rajala, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Separating the emotions: Archaeological mentalities in central Italian funerary archaeology2016In: Archaeologists and the Dead: Mortuary Archaeology in Contemporary Society / [ed] Howard Williams, Melanie Giles, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, p. 68-96Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Rajala, Ulla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Stéphane Bourdin & Vincenzo D'Ercole (ed.). I Vestini e il loro territorio dalla Preistoria al Medioevo (Collection de École française de Rome 494). 2014. 322 pages, numerous colour and b&w illustrations, tables. Rome: École française de Rome; 978-2-7283-0980-1 paperback €652016In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 90, no 350, p. 543-544Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Rajala, Ulla
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    The concentration and centralisation of late prehistoric settlement in central Italy: the evidence from the Nepi Survey2013In: Papers of The British School at Rome, ISSN 0068-2462, E-ISSN 2045-239X, Vol. 81, p. 1-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the evidence for the concentration and centralization of late prehistoric settlement in central Italy, using the territory of Nepi as an example of settlement aggregation in southern Etruria. This example helps to explain the regional developments leading to urbanization and state formation in Etruria from the Bronze Age to the Iron Age. The article also publishes new sites with late prehistoric ceramic material from the Neolithic or Epineolithic to the Iron Age in the territory of Nepi found during the Nepi Survey Project. This new evidence is discussed together with previously published material, and presented as further evidence that the developments leading to the occupation of naturally defended sites in the Final Bronze Age had their origins in the Middle Bronze Age. Similarly, the analysis, aided by agricultural and GIS modelling, suggests that the hiatus in the settlement and its dislocation after an apparent break between the Final Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age may have been caused by population pressure. After the settlement aggregated in one centre at Nepi, there are signs of further expansion in the Iron Age.

    This article discusses the evidence for the concentration and centralization of late prehistoric settlement in central Italy, using the territory of Nepi as an example of settlement aggregation in southern Etruria. This example helps to explain the regional developments leading to urbanization and state formation in Etruria from the Bronze Age to the Iron Age. The article also publishes new sites with late prehistoric ceramic material from the Neolithic or Epineolithic to the Iron Age in the territory of Nepi found during the Nepi Survey Project. This new evidence is discussed together with previously published material, and presented as further evidence that the developments leading to the occupation of naturally defended sites in the Final Bronze Age had their origins in the Middle Bronze Age. Similarly, the analysis, aided by agricultural and GIS modelling, suggests that the hiatus in the settlement and its dislocation after an apparent break between the Final Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age may have been caused by population pressure. After the settlement aggregated in one centre at Nepi, there are signs of further expansion in the Iron Age.

  • 17.
    Rajala, Ulla
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    The perennial rivers and the changing settlement patterns on the two sides of the Tiber in central Italy: The case studies of Nepi and Gabii2015In: Rivers in prehistory / [ed] Andrea Vianello, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2015, p. 103-124Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Rajala, Ulla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Arima, Heli
    Fulminante, Francesca
    Helamaa, Maija
    Five field seasons at Cisterna Grande (Crustumerium, Rome, Italy): Identities, rituals and remembrance from the Orientalising to the Archaic period2013In: Crustumerium: Ricerche plurinazionali in un Centro latino. Archaeology and identity of a Latin settlement near Rome / [ed] P. A. J. Attema, F. di Gennaro, E. Jarva, Barkhuis, 2013, p. 61-82Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume is the first of the series Corollaria Crustumina aimed at the publication of conference proceedings, doctoral theses and specialist studies on the Latin settlement of Crustumerium (Rome). It contains multidisciplinary papers of an international group of archaeologists discussing  new fieldwork data on Crustumerium's settlement, cemeteries and material culture in light of the site's cultural identity.

  • 19.
    Rajala, Ulla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Karivieri, Arja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Sorge, Elena
    Furiesi, Alessandro
    Morelli, Gianfranco
    Catanzariti, Gianluca
    The Stockholm Volterra Project: exploring a cityscape in an urban context2018In: The Archaeology of Death: Proceedings of the Seventh Conference of Italian Archaeology held at the National University of Ireland, Galway, April 16-18, 2016 / [ed] Edward Herring, Eóin O’Donoghue, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2018, p. 553-562Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the Stockholm Volterra Project and its developments since 2013. This project, run by Stockholm University and the Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, has carried out geophysical prospections in Volterra in collaboration with Soprintendenza Archeologia, Belle Arti e Paesaggio per le province di Pisa e Livorno. The aims and methods of the project are outlined together with a closer presentation of key sites from 2014 and 2015: the ‘Football Pitch’, the area in front of the church of San Giusto, the ruined church of Santo Stefano, the amphitheatre and Ortino sites.

  • 20.
    Rajala, Ulla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Mills, Philip
    Forms of Dwelling: 20 years of taskscapes in archaeology2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Rajala, Ulla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Mills, Philip
    Interpreting a ceramiscene: characterising late republican and imperial landscapes2017In: Forms of dwelling: 20 years of taskscapes in archaeology / [ed] Ulla Rajala, Philip Mills, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2017, p. 62-84Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Rajala, Ulla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Mills, Philip
    Introduction: from taskscape to ceramiscene and beyond2017In: Forms of dwelling: 20 years of taskscapes in archaeology / [ed] Ulla Rajala, Philip Mills, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2017, p. 1-15Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Rajala, Ulla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Tikkanen, Karin W.
    Multicultural interaction, colonial boundaries and changing group identities: contextualising inscriptions, languages and alphabets2018In: The Archaeology of Death: Proceedings of the Seventh Conference of Italian Archaeology held at the National University of Ireland, Galway, April 16-18, 2016 / [ed] Edward Herring, Eóin O’Donoghue, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2018, p. 138-148Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper outlines a project that is building a model for assessing multicultural interaction, which will be used for the study of the expansion of Rome in central Italy in the wider context of Latin colonisation. Its theoretical framework incorporates Social Identity Theory and the concept of mental distance applied to geographically related groups. The key materials studied at this stage are funerary architecture and inscriptions, which reveal different nested aspects of group identities. Here we briefly present the local context of the study – Nepi and the Faliscan area – with the different languages and alphabets used in the area. This area will be compared with its neighbouring areas in order to analyse long-term changes in group identities from the precolonial period to the colonial period.

1 - 23 of 23
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