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  • 1. Bruckner, Tim .A.
    et al.
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Cold ambient temperature in utero and birth outcomes in Uppsala, Sweden, 1915 to 19292014In: Annals of Epidemiology, ISSN 1047-2797, E-ISSN 1873-2585, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 116-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Although the literature reports adverse birth outcomes following ambient heat, less work focuses on cold. We, moreover, know of no studies of cold that examine stillbirth. We tested the relation between cold ambient temperature during pregnancy in Sweden and four outcomes: stillbirth, preterm, birth weight for gestational age, and birth length. We examined births from 1915 to 1929 in Uppsala, Sweden, which—unlike most societies today—experienced substandard indoor-heating and fewer amenities to provide shelter from cold.

    Methods

    We retrieved data on almost 14,000 deliveries from the Uppsala Birth Cohort Study. We linked a validated, daily ambient temperature series to all pregnancies and applied Cox proportional hazards (stillbirth and preterm) and linear regression models (birth weight and length). We tested for nonlinearity using quadratic splines.

    Results

    The risk of stillbirth rose as ambient temperature during pregnancy fell (hazard ratio for a 1°C decrease in temperature, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.00 to 1.17). Cold extremes adversely affected preterm and birth length, whereas warm extremes increased preterm risk. We observed no relation between cold and birth weight for gestational age.

    Conclusion

    In historical Sweden, cold temperatures during pregnancy increased stillbirth and preterm risk and reduced birth length among live births.

  • 2. Carlsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Andersson, Tomas
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Ahlbom, Anders
    Late retirement is not associated with increased mortality, results based on all Swedish retirements 1991-20072012In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 483-486Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. de-Graft Aikins, Ama
    et al.
    Wikler, Dan
    Allotey, Pascale
    Arrhenius, Gustaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy. Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden.
    Beisel, Uli
    Cooper, Melinda
    Eyal, Nir
    Hausman, Dan
    Lutz, Wolfgang
    Norheim, Ole F.
    Roberts, Elizabeth
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Jebari, Karim
    Global Health and the Changing Contours of Human Life2018In: Rethinking Society for the 21st Century: Report of the International Panel on Social Progress: Volume 3: Transformations in Values, Norms, Cultures / [ed] International Panel on Social Progress (IPSP), Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 713-752Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The “contours of human life” include childhood and adolescence, reproduction, the experiences of health, illness, disability, and death. These stages and aspects of life are universal and will remain so. However, social, environmental, and scientific changes are transforming their timing, texture, and patterns – and these transformations are not universally shared. Serious inequalities persist, among and within countries and regions, in longevity, morbidity, and disability, control over reproduction and sexuality, and care at the end of life. This chapter addresses these changing contours of human life in six sections: coming into being; longevity; diminished health; reproduction; enhancement; and death and dying.

  • 4. de-Graft Aikins, Ama
    et al.
    Wikler, Dan
    Allotey, Pascale
    Beisel, Uli
    Cooper, Melinda
    Eyal, Nir
    Hausman, Dan
    Lutz, Wolfgang
    Norheim, Ole F.
    Roberts, Elisabeth
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Jebari, Karim
    Global Health and the Changing Contours of Human Life2018In: Rethinking Society for the 21st Century: Report of the International Panel on Social Progress: Volume 3: Transformations in Values, Norms, Cultures, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 713-752Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contours of human life – birth, childhood, maturity, reproduction, the experiences of health, illness, and disability, and death – have been and will remain nearly universal; but their duration and texture are undergoing great changes. In this chapter, we chart the transformations and make projections into the near future. Many of the trends are favorable: fewer children are dying, and many enjoy greater longevity. But these advances are not distributed uniformly among and within countries and regions. Furthermore, the value of longevity is compromised by an increasing number of people living with diminished health under inequitable systems of health and social care. A more just future can be achieved by a continuing emphasis on equity in global health systems even as human lives continue to be extended and enhanced.

  • 5. Farahmand, B.
    et al.
    Broman, G.
    de Faire, U.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Ahlbom, A.
    Golf- a game of life and death. Reduced mortality in Swedish golf players2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine in Science and Sports, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 419-424Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Fors, Stefan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Koupil, Ilona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Socioeconomic inequalities in circulatory and all-cause mortality after retirement: the impact of mid-life income and old-age pension. Evidence from the Uppsala Birth Cohort Study2012In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 66, no 7, p. e16-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore the impact of mid-life income and old-age pensions on the risk of mortality in later life. Furthermore, the study explored whether income inequalities in old-age mortality can be explained by differences in early childhood development, social class during childhood, education or marital status.

    Methods: The study sample comprises all individuals born at Uppsala Academic Hospital during the period 1915–1924 who had retired but not died or emigrated by 1991 (n=4156). Information on social and biological conditions was retrieved from national registries.

    Results: The results show that income during mid-life and income during retirement were associated with old-age mortality. However, mutually adjusted models showed that income in mid-life was more important for women's late-life mortality and that income during retirement was more important for men's late-life mortality. Furthermore, differences in education and marital status seemed to explain a substantial part of income inequalities in late-life mortality.

    Conclusions: It is unlikely that egalitarian social policies aimed at older populations can eradicate health inequalities accumulated over the life course. However, retirement income appears to have an effect on late-life mortality that is independent of the effect of income in mid-life, suggesting that egalitarian pension schemes could affect health inequalities in later life or, at the very least, slow down further accumulation of inequalities.

  • 7. Friel, S.
    et al.
    Marmot, M.
    McMichael, A.
    Kjellstrom, T.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Global health equity and climate stabilisation: a common agenda2008In: Lancet, Vol. 372, no 9650, p. 1677-1683Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Garcy, Anthony M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    The length of unemployment predicts mortality, differently in men and women, and by cause of death: A six year mortality follow-up of the Swedish 1992-1996 recession2012In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 74, no 12, p. 1911-1920Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the relationship between the total amount of accumulated unemployment during the deep Swedish recession of 1992-1996 and mortality in the following 6 years. Nearly 3.4 million Swedish men and women, born between 1931 and 1965 who were gainfully employed at the time of the 1990 census were included. Almost 23% of these individuals were unemployed at some point during the recession. We conduct a prospective cohort study utilizing Cox proportional hazard regression with a mortality follow-up from January 1997 to December 2002. We adjust for health status (1982-1991), baseline (1991) social, family, and employer characteristics of individuals before the recession. The findings suggest that long-term unemployment is related to elevated all-cause mortality for men and women. The excess mortality effects were small for women and attributable to a positive, linear increase in the hazard of alcohol disease-related mortality and external causes-of-death not classified as suicides or transport accidents. For men, the excess hazard of all-cause mortality was best represented by a cubic, non-linear shape. The predicted hazard increases rapidly with the shortest and longest accumulated levels of unemployment. However, the underlying pattern differed by cause-of-death. The cancer, circulatory, and alcohol disease-related analyses suggest that mortality peaks with mid-levels of accumulated unemployment and then declines with longer duration unemployment. For men, we observed a positive, linear increase in the hazard ratios associated with transport and suicide mortality, and a very steep non-linear increase in the excess hazard ratio associated with other external causes of death that were not classified as suicide or transport accidents. In conclusion, mortality risk increases with the duration of unemployment among men and women. This was best described by a cubic function for men and a linear function for women. Behind this pattern, different causes-of-death varied in their relation to the accumulation of unemployment.

  • 9.
    Garcy, Anthony
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Unemployment and suicide during and after a deep recession: a longitudinal study of 3.4 million Swedish men and women2013In: American Journal of Public Health, ISSN 0090-0036, E-ISSN 1541-0048, Vol. 103, no 6, p. 1031-1038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. We tested 2 hypotheses found in studies of the relationship between suicide and unemployment: causal (stress and adversity) and selective interpretation (previous poor health).

    Methods. We estimated Cox models for adults (n = 3 424 550) born between 1931 and 1965. We examined mortality during the recession (1993–1996), postrecession (1997–2002), and a combined follow-up. Models controlled for previous medical problems, and social, family, and employer characteristics.

    Results. During the recession there was no excess hazard of mortality from suicide or events of undetermined intent. Postrecession, there was an excess hazard of suicide mortality for unemployed men but not unemployed women. However, for unemployed women with no health-problem history there was a modest hazard of suicide. Finally, there was elevated mortality from events of undetermined intent for unemployed men and women postrecession.

    Conclusions. A small part of the relationship may be related to health selection, more so during the recession. However, postrecessionary period findings suggest that much of the association could be causal. A narrow focus on suicide mortality may understate the mortality effects of unemployment in Sweden.

  • 10.
    Helgertz, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Lund University, Sweden.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Small for gestational age and adulthood risk of disability pension: the contribution of childhood and adulthood conditions2014In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 119, p. 249-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Early exiting from the labor force and into disability pension (DP) represents a major social problem in Sweden and elsewhere. We examined how being asymmetric (A-SGA) or symmetric (S-SGA) small for gestational age predicts transitioning into DP. We analyzed a longitudinal sample of 8125 men and women from the Stockholm Birth Cohort (SBC), born in 1953 and not on DP in 1990. The SBC consists of data from various sources, including self-reported information and data from administrative registers. The follow-up period was from 1991 to 2009. Yearly information on the receipt of DP benefits from register data was operationalized as a dichotomous variable. 13 percent of the sample moved into DP during follow-up. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine whether disadvantageous fetal growth - A-SGA and S-SGA - predicted DP. Men and women born A-SGA had a substantially increased hazard of DP. The full model suggested a hazard ratio of 1.68 (CI: 1.11-2.54), only being affected slightly by adulthood conditions. Several childhood conditions were also associated with DP. Such factors, however, mainly affected DP risk through adulthood conditions. The effect of SGA on DP appeared particularly strong among individuals from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds. The evidence presented suggests that being A-SGA influences the risk of DP, independent of childhood and adulthood conditions, and similarly for men and women. Due to A-SGA being rather infrequent, reducing the occurrence of A-SGA would, however, only have a marginal impact on the stock of DP pensioners. For the individual affected, the elevation in the risk of DP was nevertheless substantial. Other childhood conditions exercised a larger influence on the stock of DP recipients, but they mostly operated through adulthood attainment. The importance of socioeconomic resources in childhood for the long term health consequences of SGA is interesting from a policy perspective and warrants further research.

  • 11. Jasilionis, Domantas
    et al.
    Shkolnikov, Vladimir M.
    Andreev, Evgueni M.
    Jdanov, Dmitri A.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Meslé, France
    Vallin, Jacques
    L’avant-garde en matière d’espérance de vie montre-t-elle la voie au reste de la population?2014In: Population, ISSN 0032-4663, E-ISSN 1957-7966, Vol. 69, no 4, p. 589-615Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do vanguard populations open new frontiers of survival and longevity that will eventually be reached by others? The main aim of this study is to identify the extent to which the non-vanguard populations in Finland, Norway, and Sweden might follow the mortality trajectories of the vanguard groups in these countries for different age ranges and for the major causes of death. The results show no systematic convergence between vanguard and non-vanguard sub-populations. On the contrary, they confirm the theory whereby each major epidemiological development initially gives rise to divergence in mortality trends. Our study found that at the sub-national level, rather than simply following (with a certain time lag) the same path as the vanguard groups, non-vanguard groups have their own pathways to low mortality which are related to specific determinants of mortality change. The study also found that a long time is needed for the non-vanguard group to attain the mortality levels already reached by the vanguard group at the start of the observation period. This is notably the case for the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  • 12.
    Khanolkar, Amal
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Koupil, Ilona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Social determinants of cardiac disease biomarkers: Investigating a Swedish male cohort at ages 50 and 702012In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 523-533Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate relationships between socioeconomic position (SEP) and common CVD biomarkers including adiponectin not previously investigated in a Swedish-population sample, and to assess if these associations changed with age. Design: Population-based longitudinal cohort study of men born 1920-24 with clinical measurements, blood samples, questionnaire data, and register-based information on SEP and cause of death. Methods: A total of 2322 men attended an investigation at age 50 of which 1221 attended a reinvestigation at age 70. Association between SEP and CVD biomarkers [cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein (LDL/HDL), apolipoprotein (Apo) ApoB/ApoA1, and adiponectin] were analysed by linear regression (adjusted for age, body mass index, and physical activity). SEP was measured as occupational class and educational level. CVD mortality over 36 years of follow-up was analysed by Cox regression. Results: At age 50, we found a significant inverse association of education with cholesterol level, LDL/HDL ratio and ApoB/ApoA1 ratio. Cholesterol was also associated with occupational class, statistically significant after adjustment for all covariates. At age 70, no significant associations were found between either measurement of SEP and any of the biomarkers studied. Highest educated men had decreased risk for CVD mortality during follow-up. Conclusions: Associations of SEP with cholesterol levels and LDL/HDL ratio that exist at age 50 are no longer apparent in the same group of men at age 70. We found no significant association between SEP and adiponectin levels at age 70.

  • 13. Koupil, Ilona
    et al.
    Mann, Vera
    Leon, David A.
    Lundberg, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Byberg, Liisa
    Vågerö, Denny
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Morning cortisol does not mediate the association of size at birth with blood pressure in children born from full-term pregnancies.2005In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, Vol. 62, no 6, p. 661-666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It had been suggested that programming of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis may underlie the associations of reduced size at birth with raised blood pressure in later life. We investigated whether morning salivary cortisol mediates the inverse association of birthweight with systolic blood pressure in children.Subjects and measurements– a historical cohort study involving 1152 Swedish children aged 5–14 years, who took part in a family study comprised of mother, father, and two full-sibs delivered in 1987–1995 after 38–41 weeks gestation within 36 months of each other. Birthweight and gestational age were available from obstetric records. Blood pressure, weight, height and puberty stage were measured at a clinic. Cortisol was measured by radioimmunoassay in morning salivary samples taken at home, within 30 min of waking.Morning cortisol showed a weak negative association with length of gestation in siblings, was not related to birthweight or to systolic or diastolic blood pressure. There was no change in the strength of the negative association between birthweight and systolic blood pressure on adjustment for cortisol (−1·4 mmHg/kg, 95% CI−2·7,−0·2; adjusted for age, sex, puberty stage, weight and height, and cortisol).Morning cortisol was not associated with size at birth, and did not mediate the birthweight–blood pressure association in children born from full-term pregnancies. It is possible that basal cortisol levels are of more importance in explaining associations of size at birth with later blood pressure in older subjects, or in populations with more varied length of gestation. Alternatively, our results may be caused by misclassification of the hypothalamo–pituitary-adrenal activity.

  • 14.
    Koupil, Ilona
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Plavinskaja, S.
    Parfenova, N.
    Shestov, D.B.
    Danziger, P.D.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Cancer mortality in women and men who survived the siege of Leningrad (1941-1944)2009In: Int J Cancer, Vol. 124, no 6, p. 1416-1421Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Lager, Anton
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Bremberg, S.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Intelligence and mortality Only ignorance stops progress2010In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 340, p. c2765-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Lager, Anton
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Bremberg, S.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    The association of early IQ and education with mortality: 65 year longitudinal study in Malmö, Sweden2009In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 339, p. b5282-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To establish whether differences in early IQ explain why people with longer education live longer, or whether differences in father’s or own educational attainment explain why people with higher early IQ live longer.

    Design Population based longitudinal study. Mortality risks were estimated with Cox proportional hazards regressions.

    Setting Malmö, Sweden.

    Participants 1530 children who took IQ tests at age 10 and were followed up until age 75.

    Results Own educational attainment was negatively associated with all cause mortality in both sexes, even when early IQ and father’s education were adjusted for (hazard ratio (HR) for each additional year in school 0.91 (95% CI 0.85 to 0.97) for men and HR 0.88 (95 % CI 0.78 to 0.98) for women). Higher early IQ was linked with a reduced mortality risk in men, even when own educational attainment and father’s education were adjusted for (HR for one standard deviation increase in IQ 0.85 (95 % CI 0.75 to 0.96)). In contrast, there was no crude effect of early IQ for women, and women with above average IQ had an increased mortality risk when own educational attainment was adjusted for, but only after the age of 60 (HR 1.60 (95 % CI 1.06 to 2.42)). Adding measures of social career over and above educational attainment to the model (for example, occupational status at age 36 and number of children) only marginally affected the hazard ratio for women with above average IQ (<5%).

    Conclusions Mortality differences by own educational attainment were not explained by early IQ. Childhood IQ was independently linked, albeit differently, to male adult mortality and to female adult mortality even when father’s education and own educational attainment was adjusted for, thus social background and own social career seem unlikely to be responsible for mortality differences by childhood IQ. The clear difference in the effect of IQ between men and women suggests that the link between IQ and mortality involves the social and physical environment rather than simply being a marker of a healthy body to begin with. Cognitive skills should, therefore, be addressed in our efforts to create childhood environments that promote health.

  • 17.
    Lager, Anton
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    De Stavola, B
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Social origin, schooling and individual change in intelligence during childhood influence long-term mortality: a 68-year follow-up study2011In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 398-404Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Intelligence at a single time-point has been linked to health outcomes. An individual's IQ increases with longer schooling, but the validity of such increase is unclear. In this study, we assess the hypothesis that individual change in the performance on IQ tests between ages 10 and 20 years is associated with mortality later in life.

    Methods The analyses are based on a cohort of Swedish boys born in 1928 (n = 610) for whom social background data were collected in 1937, IQ tests were carried out in 1938 and 1948 and own education and mortality were recorded up to 2006. Structural equation models were used to estimate the extent to which two latent intelligence scores, at ages 10 and 20 years, manifested by results on the IQ tests, are related to paternal and own education, and how all these variables are linked to all-cause mortality.

    Results Intelligence at the age of 20 years was associated with lower mortality in adulthood, after controlling for intelligence at the age of 10 years. The increases in intelligence partly mediated the link between longer schooling and lower mortality. Social background differences in adult intelligence (and consequently in mortality) were partly explained by the tendency for sons of more educated fathers to receive longer schooling, even when initial intelligence levels had been accounted for.

    Conclusions The results are consistent with a causal link from change in intelligence to mortality, and further, that schooling-induced changes in IQ scores are true and bring about lasting changes in intelligence. In addition, if both these interpretations are correct, social differences in access to longer schooling have consequences for social differences in both adult intelligence and adult health.

  • 18. Leinsalu, M.
    et al.
    Stirbu, I.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Kalediene, R.
    Kovacs, K.
    Wojtyniak, B.
    Wroblewska, W.
    Mackenbach, J.P.
    Kunst, A.E.
    Educational inequalities in mortality in four Eastern European countries: divergence in trends during the post-communist transition from 1990 to 20002009In: Int J Epidemiol, Vol. 38, p. 512-525Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Lundberg, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Albin, Maria
    Hartman, Laura
    Nilsson, Ingvar
    Sjögren, Anna
    Wieselgren, Ing-Marie
    Bergmark, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Nilsson, Per
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Östergren, Per-Olof
    Det handlar om jämlik hälsa: utgångspunkter för Kommissionens vidare arbete2016Book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Lundberg, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Yngwe Åberg, Monika
    Kölegård Stjärne, Maria
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Generös familjepolitik minskar spädbarnsdöd2007In: Dagens Nyheter debatt: (2007-10-18)Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Modin, Bitte
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Erikson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Intergenerational continuity in school performance: do grandparents matter?2013In: European Sociological Review, ISSN 0266-7215, E-ISSN 1468-2672, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 858-870Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate whether present-day ninth grade students with top marks in Swedish and mathematics tend to descend from grandparents who did well in these school-subjects too. We also examine the extent to which such inheritance is domain-specific and works through the educational attainment of the previous two generations. The study is based on grandsons (n = 6,110) and granddaughters (n = 5,658) of subjects born in Uppsala 1915–1929. Results show that the odds of students receiving top marks in mathematics and Swedish tend to increase the higher the marks their grandparents achieved in these subjects. However, associations differ by the specific school-subject and according to the gender-specific intergenerational line of transmission. In broad terms, our results indicate that grandfathers are important for the transmission of mathematical and linguistic ability to their granddaughters and grandsons. Grandmothers appear to play a smaller role in the transmission of abilities, with the distinct exception of the transmission of linguistic ability from maternal grandmothers to their granddaughters. The fact that associations vary quite strongly according to type of ability and the gender-specific line of intergenerational transmission implies that we should be looking to historical context and learning environments rather than to a simple genetic transmission model to explain our findings.

  • 22.
    Modin, Bitte
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Koupil, Ilona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    The contribution of parental and grandparental childhood social disadvantage to circulatory disease diagnosis in young Swedish men2008In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 66, p. 822-834Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Modin, Bitte
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Koupil, Ilona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    The impact of early twentieth century illegitimacy across three generations. Longevity and inter-generational health correlates2009In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 68, no 9, p. 1633-1640Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Moran, Paul
    et al.
    Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, UK.
    af Klinteberg, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Batty, G. David
    University of Glasgow, and University of Edinburgh, UK.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Childhood Intelligence Predicts Hospitalization with Personality Disorder in Adulthood: Evidence from a Population-Based Study in Sweden2009In: Journal of Personality Disorders, ISSN 0885-579x, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 535-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although low pre-morbid IQ is an established risk factor for severe mental illness, its association with personality disorder (PD) is unclear. We set out to examine whether there is a prospective association between childhood intelligence and PD in adulthood. Using a population-based prospective cohort study, we linked childhood IQ scores to routinely collected hospital discharge records in adulthood. Lower IQ scores were related to higher risk of being hospitalized with a PD across the full range of IQ scores, (odds ratio per one SD increase in IQ was 0.60; 95% CI: 0.49–0.75; p(trend) = 0.001). Adjusting for potential confounding variables had virtually no impact. We conclude that low childhood IQ predicts hospitalization with PD and may be an important factor in the development of PD.

  • 25.
    Rajaleid, Kristiina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    The role of cognitive ability in the association between size at birth and ischemic heart disease mortality2010Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 26. Shkolnikov, Vladimir M.
    et al.
    Andreev, Evgueni M.
    Jdanov, Dmitri A.
    Jasilionis, Domantas
    Kravdal, Øystein
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Valkonen, Tapani
    Increasing absolute mortality disparities by education in Finland, Norway and Sweden, 1971-20002012In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 66, no 4, p. 372-378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives Studies on socioeconomic health disparities often suffer from a lack of uniform data and methodology. Using high quality, census-linked data and sensible inequality measures, this study documents the changes in absolute and relative mortality differences by education in Finland, Norway and Sweden over the period 1971 to 2000.

    Methods The age-standardised mortality rates and the population exposures for three educational categories were computed from detailed data provided by the national statistical offices. Mortality disparities by education were assessed using two range measures (rate differences and rate ratios), and two Gini-like measures (the average inter-group difference (AID) and the Gini coefficient (G)). The formulae for the decomposition of the change in the AID into (1) the contribution of change in population composition by education, and (2) the contribution of mortality change were introduced.

    Results Mortality decreases were often greater for high than for medium and low education. Both relative and absolute mortality disparities tend to increase over time. The magnitude and timing of the increases in absolute disparities vary by country. Both the rate differences and the AIDs have increased since the 1970s in Norway and Sweden, and since the 1980s in Finland. The contributions of the changes in population composition to the total AID increase were substantial in all countries, and for both sexes. The mortality contributions were substantial for males in Norway and Sweden.

    Conclusions The study reports increases in absolute mortality disparity, and its components. This trend needs to be further studied and addressed by policies.

  • 27.
    Stenberg, Sten-Åke
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Vågerö, Denny
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Österman, Reidar
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Arvidsson, E.
    von Otter, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Janson, C-E
    Stockholm Birth Cohort Study 1953-2003: A new tool for life-courses studies2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 104-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To create a new tool for life-course studies of health outcomes as well as social outcomes. Methods: Two anonymous data sets, one a local birth cohort and the other a nationwide registry, covering information from early and middle life, respectively, were matched using a "key for probability matching" based on a large number of variables, common to both data sets. The first data set provides social and health information from birth, childhood, and adolescence on boys and girls, born in Stockholm in 1953. The second data set provides information on income, work, and education as well as any inpatient visits and any mortality from mid-life for the entire Swedish population. Results: For 96% of the original cohort it was possible to add data from mid-life. Thus, a new database has been created, referred to as the Stockholm Birth Cohort Study, which provides rich and unique life-course data from birth to age 50 for 14,294 individuals: 7,305 men and 6,989 women. Comparison of matched and unmatched cases in the original cohort suggests that those individuals that could not be matched had slightly more favourable social and intellectual circumstances and had often moved away from Sweden in the 1980s. Conclusion: The new database provides excellent opportunities for life-course studies on health and social outcomes. It allows for studies that have not previously been possible in Sweden or elsewhere. Further, it provides an opportunity for collaborative work with similar databases in Copenhagen and Aberdeen.

  • 28. Stickley, A.
    et al.
    Kislitsyna, O.
    Timofeeva, I.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Attitudes Toward Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in Moscow2008In: Journal of Family Violence, Vol. 23, p. 447-456Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29. Svensson, Anna C.
    et al.
    Fredlund, Peeter
    Laflamme, Lucie
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Ekbom, Anders
    Feychting, Maria
    Forsberg, Birger
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Magnusson, Cecilia
    Cohort profile: the Stockholm public health cohort2013In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 1263-1272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Stockholm Public Health Cohort was set up within the Stockholm County Council public health surveys to inform on determinants and consequences of significant contributors to the current burden of disease. Participants are 89 268 randomly selected individuals from the adult population of Stockholm County. Baseline surveys took place in 2002, 2006 and 2010 via self-administered questionnaires. So far, participants recruited in 2002 were re-surveyed twice, in 2007 and 2010, and those enrolled in 2006 were re-surveyed once, in 2010. Self-reported data are regularly supplemented by information from national and regional health data and administrative registers, for study participants and their relatives (including their offspring). Available data are extensive and include a wide array of health, lifestyle, perinatal, demographic, socio-economic and familial factors. The cohort is an international resource for epidemiological research, and the data available to the research community for specific studies obtained approval from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort Steering Committee and the Stockholm Regional Ethical Review Board.

  • 30.
    Tiikkaja, Sanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Hemström, Örjan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Intergenerational class mobility and cardiovascular mortality among Swedish women: a population-based register study2009In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 68, p. 733-739Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Alexandr Nemtsov’s pioneering work on alcohol in modern Soviet and Russian and Soviet history.2011In: A contemporary history of alcohol in Russia / [ed] Nemtsov, Alexandr, Stockholm: Södertörns högskola , 2011, p. 13-32Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Att skriva historia - Peter Fröberg Idling2015In: Sociologi genom litteratur / [ed] Christopher Edling & Jens Rydgren, Lund: Arkiv förlag & tidskrift, 2015, p. 147-156Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Centre for Health Equity Studies2014In: Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm University: 1964-2014 / [ed] Gudrun Dahl, Mats Danielson, Stockholm: Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm University , 2014, p. 339-360Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Closing the global health gaps in a generation. How is it possible?2008In: International Journal of Public Health, Vol. 53, p. 279-280Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    En folkhälsopolitisk kardinalfråga:  ökade sociala skillnader i dödlighet under fyra decennier2011In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 292-297Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    ”Från Santiago till Malmö…och sen?”2014In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 91, no 5, p. 459-467Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Globalisering och hälsa2009In: Utrikesutskottets betänkande 2008/09:UU13, Stockholm: Riksdagen , 2009Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    The East- West health divide in Europe: Growing and shifting eastwards2010In: European Review, ISSN 1062-7987, E-ISSN 1474-0575, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 23-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over a four-decade long period, a health gap has opened up between European countries, in particular along the East/West dimension. One could speak of a European health divide. The divide is growing larger and, at the same time, shifting eastwards, leaving countries such as Russia, Ukraine, Belarus and Moldova at an increasing health disadvantage. Health inequalities, or differences between social classes, within European countries also seem to have been growing for the last couple of decades. Those countries that were previously led by communist regimes today show larger health inequalities than do countries in Western Europe. The countries that were once part of the Soviet Union demonstrate the most alarming health trends, with large segments of the population actually experiencing falling life expectancies. Reducing global and European health inequalities so that the health chances of a newborn child are not dependent on which country and social class he or she is born in, is a truly formidable task, which implies an entirely new way of seeing human development.

  • 39.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Ökade skillnader i hälsa i världen - ojämlikheten globaliseras2012In: Den orättvisa hälsan: Om socioekonomiska skillnader i hälsa och livslängd / [ed] Mikael Rostila, Susanna Toivanen, Liber, 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Vågerö, Denny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Разрыв «запад – восток» в состоянии здоровья населения европы: рост проблем в восточном направлении2010In: Journal of Social Policy Studies/Журнал Исследований Социальной Политики, ISSN 1727-0634, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 319-330Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Vågerö, Denny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Aronsson, Vanda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Why is parental lifespan linked to children’s chances of reaching a high age? A transgenerational hypothesis2018In: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 4, p. 45-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Transgenerational determinants of longevity are poorly understood. We used data from four linked generations (G0, G1, G2 and G3) of the Uppsala Birth Cohort Multigeneration Study to address this issue.

    Methods

    Mortality in G1 (N = 9565) was followed from 1961–2015 and analysed in relation to tertiles of their parents’ (G0) age-at-death using Cox regression. Parental social class and marital status were adjusted for in the analyses, as was G1’s birth order and adult social class. For an almost entirely deceased segment of G1 (n = 1149), born 1915–1917, we compared exact age-at-death with G0 parents’ age-at-death. Finally, we explored ‘resilience’ as a potentially important mechanism for intergenerational transmission of longevity, using conscript information from psychological interviews of G2 and G3 men.

    Results

    G0 men’s and women’s ages-at-death were independently associated with G1 midlife and old age mortality. This association was robust and minimally reduced when G0 and G1 social class were adjusted for. We observed an increased lifespan in all social groups. Median difference in age-at-death for sons compared to fathers was + 3.9 years, and + 6.9 years for daughters compared to mothers.

    Parents’ and maternal grandmother’s longevity were associated with resilience in subsequent generations. Resilience scores of G2 men were also associated with those of their G3 sons and with their own mortality in midlife.

    Conclusions

    The chance of reaching a high age is transmitted from parents to children in a modest, but robust way. Longevity inheritance is paralleled by the inheritance of individual resilience. Individual resilience, we propose, develops in the first part of life as a response to adversity and early experience in general. This gives rise to a transgenerational pathway, distinct from social class trajectories. A theory of longevity inheritance should bring together previous thinking around general susceptibility, frailty and resilience with new insights from epigenetics and social epidemiology.

  • 42.
    Vågerö, Denny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Garcy, Anthony M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Does unemployment cause long-term mortality? Selection and causation after the 1992–96 deep Swedish recession2016In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 778-783Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mass unemployment in Europe is endemic, especially among the young. Does it cause mortality? Methods: We analyzed long-term effects of unemployment occurring during the deep Swedish recession 1992–96. Mortality from all and selected causes was examined in the 6-year period after the recession among those employed in 1990 (3.4 million). Direct health selection was analyzed as risk of unemployment by prior medical history based on all hospitalizations 1981–91. Unemployment effects on mortality were estimated with and without adjustment for prior social characteristics and for prior medical history. Results: A prior circulatory disease history did not predict unemployment; a history of alcohol-related disease or suicide attempts did, in men and women. Unemployment predicted excess male, but not female, mortality from circulatory disease, both ischemic heart disease and stroke, and from all causes combined, after full adjustment. Adjustment for prior social characteristics reduced estimates considerably; additional adjustment for prior medical history did not. Mortality from external and alcohol-related causes was raised in men and women experiencing unemployment, after adjustment for social characteristics and medical history. For the youngest birth cohorts fully adjusted alcohol mortality HRs were substantial (male HR = 4.44; female HR = 5.73). The effect of unemployment on mortality was not uniform across the population; men, those with a low education, low income, unmarried or in urban employment were more vulnerable. Conclusions: Direct selection by medical history explains a modest fraction of any increased mortality risk following unemployment. Mass unemployment imposes long-term mortality risk on a sizeable segment of the population.

  • 43.
    Vågerö, Denny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Kislitsyna, Olga
    Ferlander, Sara
    Migranova, Ludmila
    Carlson, Per
    Rimachevskaya, Natalia
    Moscow Health Survey 2004 – social surveying under difficult circumstances2008In: International Journal of Public Health, Vol. 53, p. 171-179Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Vågerö, Denny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Koupil, Ilona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Parfenova, Nina
    Sparén, Pär
    Long-term health consequences following the siege of Leningrad2013In: Early Life Nutrition and Adult Health and Development: Lessons from Changing Dietary Patterns, Famines and Experimental Studies / [ed] L. H. Lumey and Alexander Vaiserman, New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2013, p. 207-225Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Vågerö, Denny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Pinger, Pia R.
    Aronsson, Vanda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    van den Berg, Gerard J.
    Paternal grandfather's access to food predicts all-cause and cancer mortality in grandsons2018In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, article id 5124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of animals and plants suggest that nutritional conditions in one generation may affect phenotypic characteristics in subsequent generations. A small number of human studies claim to show that pre-pubertal nutritional experience trigger a sex-specific transgenerational response along the male line. A single historical dataset, the Overkalix cohorts in northern Sweden, is often quoted as evidence. To test this hypothesis on an almost 40 times larger dataset we collect harvest data during the pre-pubertal period of grandparents (G0, n = 9,039) to examine its potential association with mortality in children (G1, n = 7,280) and grandchildren (G2, n = 11,561) in the Uppsala Multigeneration Study. We find support for the main Overkalix finding: paternal grandfather's food access in pre-puberty predicts his male, but not female, grandchildren's all-cause mortality. In our study, cancer mortality contributes strongly to this pattern. We are unable to reproduce previous results for diabetes and cardiovascular mortality.

  • 46.
    Vågerö, Denny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Rajaleid, Kristiina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Does childhood trauma influence offspring’s birth characteristics?2017In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 219-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A recent epigenetic hypothesis postulates that ‘a sex-specific male-line transgenerational effect exists in humans’, which can be triggered by childhood trauma during ‘the slow growth period’ just before puberty. The evidence is based on a few rather small epidemiological studies. We examine what response childhood trauma predicts, if any, in the birth size and prematurity risk of almost 800 000 offspring. Methods: Children of parity 1, 2 or 3, born 1976-2002 in Sweden, for whom we could trace both parents and all four grandparents, constituted generation 3 (G3, n ¼ 764 569). Around 5% of their parents, G2, suffered parental (G1) death during their own childhood. The association of such trauma in G2 with G3 prematurity and birthweight was analysed, while controlling for confounders in G1 and G2. We examined whether the slow growth period was extra sensitive to parental loss. Results: Parental (G1) death during (G2) childhood predicts premature birth and lower birthweight in the offspring generation (G3). This response is dependent on G2 gender, G2 age at exposure and G3 parity, but not G3 gender. Conclusions: The results are compatible with the Pembrey-Bygren hypothesis that trauma exposure during boys’ slow growth period may trigger a transgenerational response; age at trauma exposure among girls seems less important, suggesting a different set of pathways for any transgenerational response. Finally, parental death during childhood was not important for the reproduction of social inequalities in birthweight and premature birth.

  • 47.
    Vågerö, Denny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Rajaleid, Kristiina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Transgenerational response and life history theory: a response to Peeter Hõrak2017In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 233-234Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Vågerö, Denny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Sariaslan, Amir
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Childhood trauma and offspring birth characteristics: an intergenerational study of siblings2010In: Longitudinal and Life Course Studies, Vol. 1, no 3 Suppl, p. 77-Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 48 of 48
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