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  • 1.
    Brännström, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rojas, Yerko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rethinking the Long-term Consequences of Growing up in a Disadvantaged Neighbourhood: Lessons from Sweden2012In: Housing Studies, ISSN 0267-3037, E-ISSN 1466-1810, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 729-747Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using extensive longitudinal register data for more than 80 000 young metropolitan Swedes, this study addresses the effect of a disadvantaged neighbourhood social context on groupings of outcomes that are important for the living conditions of young adults. The overall results show that growing up in a disadvantaged neighbourhood increases the risk of experiencing comparably more unemployment, having less education and receiving more social assistance than similar young people from more affluent neighbourhoods. However, when the estimated effects of neighbourhood are assessed by means of an epidemiological impact measure that takes the prevalence of the risk factor at population level into account; these effects prove to be minimal. We discuss possible drawbacks of placing too much emphasis on policies targeting disadvantaged neighbourhoods versus universal social policy measures.

  • 2.
    Bäckman, Olof
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Esser, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Korpi, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rojas, Yerko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sjöberg, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Comparative Indicators on Job Quality and Social Protection2009In: Quality of Work in the European Union: Concept, Data and Debates from a Transnational Perspective / [ed] Ana M. Guillén, Svenn-Åge Dahl, Brussels: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2009Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Esser, Ingrid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Bäckman, Olof
    Institutet för framtidsstudier.
    Korpi, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nelson, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rojas, Yerko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Sjöberg, Ola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Indicadores Comparativos Sobre Calidad En El Empleo Y Protection Social2009In: Calidad Del Trabajo En La Unión Europa. Concepto, Tensiones, Dimensiones / [ed] Guillén Rodríguez, A-M., Guitérrez Palacios, R., González Begega, S. (Eds.), Navarra: Thomson Civitas , 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Rojas, Yerko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Childhood Social Exclusion and Suicidal Behavior in Adolescence and Young Adulthood2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis I analyze, with the help of social epidemiological theories, childhood risk factors behind suicidal behavior in adolescence and young adulthood. The data comes mainly from the Swedish “Stockholm Birth Cohort Study” (SBC) consisting of 15,117 participants. A total of four separate studies are included.

    The first study is restricted to boys born in 1953. By analyzing data from different registers and questions from a survey conducted when they were 12-13 years old it is shown that those who spent most of their time alone, had been absent from school even though they were not ill or grew up in a family which received means-tested benefits at least once during their childhood had a higher risk of taking their own lives. The second study includes the same boys, but suicidal behavior is extended to also encompass suicide attempts and is analyzed in parallel with interpersonal violence. The results show that these different behaviors can be similarly explained by shortcomings in social bonds and relative deprivation during childhood. The third study, which focuses on women’s suicidality within the SBC, shows that girls with both above and below average marks in the sixth grade had a higher risk of engaging in suicidal behavior as adolescents or young adults. However, this relation only held for girls who had grown up with supportive parental ambitions in terms of educational commitment. For boys, only low school performance was shown to be suicidogenic, irrespective of parental ambitions. The fourth and final study is based on the international “Health Behavior in School-aged Children” study and information from international databases. Here it is shown that the suicide rate among 15-24 year old women in 30 European and North American countries at the end of the 2000s was inversely related to how many days a week 15 year old girls involved themselves with friends in 2005/2006.

    The introductory chapter of the thesis begins with a short background to the theme of social exclusion and suicidality. This section is followed by a more detailed discussion of how the notion of social recognition that is found within the social exclusion literature, can help nuance our understanding of social isolation and suicidal behavior further.

  • 5.
    Rojas, Yerko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Evictions and short-term all-cause mortality: a 3-year follow-up study of a middle-aged Swedish population2017In: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 62, no 3, p. 343-351Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    This study sets out to explore whether being forcibly removed from one’s home is related to all-cause mortality.

    Methods

    With the help of unique register data covering all middle-aged persons registered at the Swedish Enforcement Authority with a case closed by an eviction during the period 2009–2011 (n = 2092), evictees’ deaths from any cause that occurred within 3 years of the date of the eviction are compared with the all-cause mortality of a random sample of the Swedish population (n = 426,117). The analysis is based on penalized maximum likelihood logistic regressions.

    Results

    Those who had been evicted from their homes were found to be approximately one and a half times more likely to die from any cause than those who had not been exposed to this experience (OR = 1.59), controlling for several demographic, socio-economic and health conditions prior to the date of the eviction.

    Conclusions

    The results provide support for the notion that the experience of losing one’s dwelling place should be treated as a major life event in its own right, just like other well-established social stressors.

  • 6.
    Rojas, Yerko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    School performance and gender differences in suicidal behaviour - a 30-year follow-up of a Stockholm cohort born in 19532013In: Gender and Education, ISSN 0954-0253, E-ISSN 1360-0516, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 578-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Astonishingly little is known about the relationship between high educational achievements and suicidal behaviour among women. This is remarkable given that a woman breaking into traditionally male-dominant spheres is a well established example of social-role marginality. The current study combines fatal and non-fatal suicidal behaviour and analyses, by means of logistic regression, the degree to which high school performance during pre-adolescence in the mid-1960s, in Sweden, had a detrimental effect on suicidal behaviour for women, as opposed to men, in adolescence and young adulthood. The Stockholm birth cohort study was used for this purpose. The results show that girls with both above and below average marks had an elevated risk of engaging in suicidal behaviour. However, this relation only held for girls who had grown up with supportive parental ambitions in terms of educational commitment. For boys, only low school performance was shown to be suicidogenic, irrespective of parental ambitions.

  • 7.
    Rojas, Yerko
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Self-directed and interpersonal male violence in adolescence and young adulthood: a 30-year follow up of a Stockholm cohort2012In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 16-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In line with Wilkinson's theory on inequality and health, this study simultaneously analyses self-directed and interpersonal violence among men in a Stockholm birth cohort born in 1953 with respect to their early life experiences of stress, their lack of social connectedness and their relative deprivation. Multinomial logistic regressions with cluster-robust variance estimates were used. Self-directed violence was found to be related to self-rated loneliness and non-membership of voluntary associations but not to a lack of friendship in school at the age of 12–13, while the opposite was shown to be true for interpersonal violence. Growing up in a family that received means-tested social assistance at least once during the period 1953–1965 was taken as an objective indicator of relative deprivation and proved to be correlated with both self-directed and interpersonal violence. Disadvantaged social comparison at the age of 12–13, taken as a subjective indicator of relative deprivation, was only statistically related to a subsequent risk of interpersonal violence. It is suggested that different types of social connectedness and relative deprivation, respectively, explain these different patterns of violence. Furthermore, the study speculates on the possibility of frequent social comparison itself being a factor to consider when trying understanding violence in general.

  • 8.
    Rojas, Yerko
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Stenberg, Sten-Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Early life circumstances and male suicide - A 30-year follow-up of a Stockholm cohort born in 19532010In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 420-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses the relationship between early life circumstances and suicide during adolescence and young adulthood among men in a Stockholm birth cohort born in 1953. Relevant variables were derived from Durkheim's proposition of social integration and suicide and Merton's strain theory of deviance. The links between our background variables and suicide were estimated with rare events logistic regression, a statistical method specially developed for situations in which rare events are endemic to the data. We found that self-rated loneliness at age 12–13 as an indicator of social isolation, school absenteeism at the same age as an indicator of school integration, and growing up in a family which received means-tested social assistance at least once during the period 1953–1965 as an indicator of childhood poverty, were statistically related to subsequent suicide risk between 1970 and 1984. Furthermore, following Bourdieu's rereading of Durkheim's Suicide, we argue that social isolation and school integration can be seen as important forms of deprivation, since “social integration” can also be understood in terms of “social recognition”. This view emphasises the importance of taking the emotional and social poverty of children just as seriously as their material poverty when it comes to suicide.

  • 9.
    Rojas, Yerko
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Stenberg, Sten-Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Evictions and suicide: a follow up study of almost 22,000 Swedish households in the wake of the global financial crisis2016In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 409-413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Millions of families across the world are evicted every year. However, very little is known about the impact that eviction has on their lives. This lack of knowledge is also starting to be noticed within the suicidological literature, and prominent scholars are arguing that there is an urgent need to explore the extent to which suicides may be considered a plausible consequence of being faced with eviction.

    METHOD: The present study's sample consists of all persons served with an application for execution of an eviction order during 2009-2012. This group is compared to a random 10% sample of the general Swedish population, ages 16 years and over. The analysis is based on penalised maximum likelihood logistic regressions.

    RESULTS: Those who had lost their legal right to their dwellings and for whom the landlord had applied for the eviction to be executed were approximately four times more likely to commit suicide than those who had not been exposed to this experience (OR=4.42), controlling for several demographic, socioeconomic and mental health conditions prior to the date of the judicial decision.

    CONCLUSIONS: Home evictions have a significant and detrimental impact on individuals' risk of committing suicide, even when several other well-known suicidogenic risk factors are controlled for. Our results reinforce the importance of ongoing attempts to remove the issue of evictions from its status as a hidden and neglected social problem.

  • 10.
    Rojas, Yerko
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Stenberg, Sten-Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Större självmordsrisk för ensamma pojkar: Artikel i Dagens Nyheter 2009-12-05, s. 122009Other (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Rojas, Yerko
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Stickley, Andrew
    Informal social capital in childhood and suicide among adolescent and young adult women: A cross-sectional analysis with 30 countries2014In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, E-ISSN 1879-243X, no 42, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using data from the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) Study 2005/2006, and World Health Organization (WHO), this study examined the relationship between girls' informal social capital and female suicide rates in adolescence and young adulthood in 30 European and North American countries. Regression analyses using normal, robust and bias-corrected confidence intervals were used for this purpose. Informal social capital (involvement with friends after school) among 15 year-old girls explained,9% of the total variation in the young female suicide rate. This effect was of approximately the same magnitude as that of the corresponding male suicide rate. Although the findings of this study provide support for the common notion that female suicide can be understood in relation to male suicide, the association we observed between female informal social capital in adolescence and early adult female suicide highlights the need for more female-specific studies on suicide.

1 - 11 of 11
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