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  • 1. Bouchard, Frédéric
    et al.
    Sansoulet, Julie
    Fritz, Michael
    Malenfant-Lepage, Julie
    Nieuwendam, Alexandre
    Paquette, Michel
    Rudy, Ashley C. A.
    Siewert, Matthias B.
    Sjöberg, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Tanski, George
    Habeck, J. Otto
    Harbor, Jon
    Frozen-Ground Cartoons: Permafrost comics as an innovative tool for polar outreach, education, and engagement2019In: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057, Vol. 54, no 5-6, p. 366-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Permafrost occupies 20 million square kilometres of Earth's high-latitude and high-altitude landscapes. These regions are sensitive to climate change and human activities; hence, permafrost research is of considerable scientific and societal importance. However, the results of this research are generally not known by the general public. Communicating scientific concepts is an increasingly important task in the research world. Different ways to engage learners and incorporate narratives in teaching materials exist, yet they are generally underused. Here we report on an international scientific outreach project called Frozen-Ground Cartoons, which aims at making permafrost science accessible and fun for students, teachers, and parents through the creation of comic strips. We present the context in which the project was initiated, as well as recent education and outreach activities. The future phases of the project primarily involve a series of augmented reality materials, such as maps, photos, videos, and 3D drawings. With this project we aim to foster understanding of permafrost research among broader audiences, inspire future permafrost researchers, and raise public and science community awareness of polar science, education, outreach, and engagement.

  • 2. Fritz, M.
    et al.
    Deshpande, B. N.
    Bouchard, F.
    Högström, E.
    Malenfant-Lepage, J.
    Morgenstern, A.
    Nieuwendam, A.
    Oliva, M.
    Paquette, M.
    Rudy, A. C. A.
    Siewert, Matthias B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Sjöberg, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Weege, S.
    Brief Communication: Future avenues for permafrost science from the perspective of early career researchers2015In: The Cryosphere, ISSN 1994-0416, E-ISSN 1994-0424, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 1715-1720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accelerating climate change and increased economic and environmental interests in permafrost-affected regions have resulted in an acute need for more directed permafrost research. In June 2014, 88 early career researchers convened to identify future priorities for permafrost research. This multidisciplinary forum concluded that five research topics deserve greatest attention: permafrost landscape dynamics, permafrost thermal modeling, integration of traditional knowledge, spatial distribution of ground ice, and engineering issues. These topics underline the need for integrated research across a spectrum of permafrost-related domains and constitute a contribution to the Third International Conference on Arctic Research Planning (ICARP III).

  • 3. Harpold, A. A.
    et al.
    Marshall, J. A.
    Lyon, Steve W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Barnhart, T. B.
    Fisher, B. A.
    Donovan, M.
    Brubaker, K. M.
    Crosby, C. J.
    Glenn, N. F.
    Glennie, C. L.
    Kirchner, P. B.
    Lam, Norris
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Mankoff, K. D.
    McCreight, J. L.
    Molotch, N. P.
    Musselman, K. N.
    Pelletier, J.
    Russo, T.
    Sangireddy, H.
    Sjöberg, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Swetnam, T.
    West, N.
    Laser vision: lidar as a transformative tool to advance critical zone science2015In: Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, ISSN 1027-5606, E-ISSN 1607-7938, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 2881-2897Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Observation and quantification of the Earth's surface is undergoing a revolutionary change due to the increased spatial resolution and extent afforded by light detection and ranging (lidar) technology. As a consequence, lidar-derived information has led to fundamental discoveries within the individual disciplines of geomorphology, hydrology, and ecology. These disciplines form the cornerstones of critical zone (CZ) science, where researchers study how interactions among the geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere shape and maintain the 'zone of life', which extends from the top of unweathered bedrock to the top of the vegetation canopy. Fundamental to CZ science is the development of transdisciplinary theories and tools that transcend disciplines and inform other's work, capture new levels of complexity, and create new intellectual outcomes and spaces. Researchers are just beginning to use lidar data sets to answer synergistic, transdisciplinary questions in CZ science, such as how CZ processes co-evolve over long timescales and interact over shorter timescales to create thresholds, shifts in states and fluxes of water, energy, and carbon. The objective of this review is to elucidate the transformative potential of lidar for CZ science to simultaneously allow for quantification of topographic, vegetative, and hydrological processes. A review of 147 peer-reviewed lidar studies highlights a lack of lidar applications for CZ studies as 38 % of the studies were focused in geomorphology, 18 % in hydrology, 32 % in ecology, and the remaining 12 % had an interdisciplinary focus. A handful of exemplar transdisciplinary studies demonstrate lidar data sets that are well-integrated with other observations can lead to fundamental advances in CZ science, such as identification of feedbacks between hydrological and ecological processes over hillslope scales and the synergistic co-evolution of landscape-scale CZ structure due to interactions amongst carbon, energy, and water cycles. We propose that using lidar to its full potential will require numerous advances, including new and more powerful open-source processing tools, exploiting new lidar acquisition technologies, and improved integration with physically based models and complementary in situ and remote-sensing observations. We provide a 5-year vision that advocates for the expanded use of lidar data sets and highlights subsequent potential to advance the state of CZ science.

  • 4.
    Jaramillo, Fernando
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre.
    Desormeaux, Amanda
    Hedlund, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Jawitz, James W.
    Clerici, Nicola
    Piemontese, Luigi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Alexandra Rodríguez-Rodriguez, Jenny
    Adolfo Anaya, Jesús
    Blanco-Libreros, Juan F.
    Borja, Sonia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Celi, Jorge
    Chalov, Sergey
    Chun, Kwok Pan
    Cresso, Matilda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Destouni, Georgia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Dessu, Shimelis Behailu
    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano
    Downing, Andrea
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Espinosa, Luisa
    Ghajarnia, Navid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Girard, Pierre
    Gutiérrez, Álvaro G.
    Hansen, Amy
    Hu, Tengfei
    Jarsjö, Jerker
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Kalantary, Zahra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Labbaci, Adnane
    Licero-Villanueva, Lucia
    Livsey, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Machotka, Ewa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Asian, Middle Eastern and Turkish Studies.
    McCurley, Kathryn
    Palomino-Ángel, Sebastián
    Pietron, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Price, René
    Ramchunder, Sorain J.
    Ricaurte-Villota, Constanza
    Ricaurte, Luisa Fernanda
    Dahir, Lula
    Rodríguez, Erasmo
    Salgado, Jorge
    Sannel, A. Britta K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Carolina Santos, Ana
    Seifollahi-Aghmiuni, Samaneh
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Sjöberg, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Sun, Lian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. Beijing Normal University, China.
    Thorslund, Josefin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Vigouroux, Guillaume
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Wang-Erlandsson, Lan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Xu, Diandian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography. Hohai University, China.
    Zamora, David
    Ziegler, Alan D.
    Åhlén, Imenne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Priorities and Interactions of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with Focus on Wetlands2019In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 11, no 3, article id 619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wetlands are often vital physical and social components of a country's natural capital, as well as providers of ecosystem services to local and national communities. We performed a network analysis to prioritize Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets for sustainable development in iconic wetlands and wetlandscapes around the world. The analysis was based on the information and perceptions on 45 wetlandscapes worldwide by 49 wetland researchers of the Global Wetland Ecohydrological Network (GWEN). We identified three 2030 Agenda targets of high priority across the wetlandscapes needed to achieve sustainable development: Target 6.3-Improve water quality; 2.4-Sustainable food production; and 12.2-Sustainable management of resources. Moreover, we found specific feedback mechanisms and synergies between SDG targets in the context of wetlands. The most consistent reinforcing interactions were the influence of Target 12.2 on 8.4-Efficient resource consumption; and that of Target 6.3 on 12.2. The wetlandscapes could be differentiated in four bundles of distinctive priority SDG-targets: Basic human needs, Sustainable tourism, Environmental impact in urban wetlands, and Improving and conserving environment. In general, we find that the SDG groups, targets, and interactions stress that maintaining good water quality and a wise use of wetlandscapes are vital to attaining sustainable development within these sensitive ecosystems.

  • 5.
    Lyon, S.W.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Sjöberg, Y.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Jantze, E.J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Destouni, G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Estimating permafrost changes via storage-discharge dynamics2011In: Abstract: C53G-01, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6. Muster, Sina
    et al.
    Roth, Kurt
    Langer, Moritz
    Lange, Stephan
    Aleina, Fabio Cresto
    Bartsch, Annett
    Morgenstern, Anne
    Grosse, Guido
    Jones, Benjamin
    Sannel, A. Britta K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Sjöberg, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Günther, Frank
    Andresen, Christian
    Veremeeva, Alexandra
    Lindgren, Prajna R.
    Bouchard, Frédéric
    Lara, Mark J.
    Fortier, Daniel
    Charbonneau, Simon
    Virtanen, Tarmo A.
    Hugelius, Gustaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Palmtag, Juri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Siewert, Matthias B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Riley, William J.
    Koven, Charles D.
    Boike, Julia
    PeRL: a circum-Arctic Permafrost Region Pond and Lake database2017In: Earth System Science Data, ISSN 1866-3508, E-ISSN 1866-3516, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 317-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ponds and lakes are abundant in Arctic permafrost lowlands. They play an important role in Arctic wetland ecosystems by regulating carbon, water, and energy fluxes and providing freshwater habitats. However, ponds, i. e., waterbodies with surface areas smaller than 1.0 x 10(4) m(2), have not been inventoried on global and regional scales. The Permafrost Region Pond and Lake (PeRL) database presents the results of a circum-Arctic effort to map ponds and lakes from modern (2002-2013) high-resolution aerial and satellite imagery with a resolution of 5m or better. The database also includes historical imagery from 1948 to 1965 with a resolution of 6m or better. PeRL includes 69 maps covering a wide range of environmental conditions from tundra to boreal regions and from continuous to discontinuous permafrost zones. Waterbody maps are linked to regional permafrost landscape maps which provide information on permafrost extent, ground ice volume, geology, and lithology. This paper describes waterbody classification and accuracy, and presents statistics of waterbody distribution for each site. Maps of permafrost landscapes in Alaska, Canada, and Russia are used to extrapolate waterbody statistics from the site level to regional landscape units. PeRL presents pond and lake estimates for a total area of 1.4 x 10(6) km(2) across the Arctic, about 17% of the Arctic lowland (<300ma. s.l.) land surface area. PeRL waterbodies with sizes of 1.0 x 10(6) m(2) down to 1.0 x 10(2) m(2) contributed up to 21% to the total water fraction. Waterbody density ranged from 1.0 x 10 to 9.4 x 10(1) km(-2). Ponds are the dominant waterbody type by number in all landscapes representing 45-99% of the total waterbody number. The implementation of PeRL size distributions in land surface models will greatly improve the investigation and projection of surface inundation and carbon fluxes in permafrost lowlands. Waterbody maps, study area boundaries, and maps of regional permafrost landscapes including detailed metadata are available at https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.868349.

  • 7.
    Sjöberg, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Linking water and permafrost dynamics2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The extent and dynamics of permafrost are tightly linked to the distribution and movement of water in arctic landscapes. As the Arctic warms more rapidly than the global average, profound changes are expected in both permafrost and hydrology; however, much is still not known about the interactions between these two systems. The aim of this thesis is to provide new knowledge on the links between permafrost and hydrology under varying environmental conditions and across different scales. The objectives are to (i) determine how permafrost distributions and patterns in morphology are linked to hydrology, (ii) determine how groundwater flow influences ground temperature dynamics in permafrost landscapes, and (iii) explore the mechanisms that link permafrost to groundwater and streamflow dynamics. A range of methods have been applied within the four studies (papers I-IV) comprising the thesis: geophysical (ground penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography) and GIS techniques for mapping and analyzing permafrost distributions and related morphology; numerical modeling of coupled heat and water fluxes for mechanistic understanding permafrost-hydrological links; and statistical analyses for detecting trends in streamflow associated with permafrost thaw. Combining these various methods here allows for, and may be considered a prerequisite for, novel insights to processes. The thesis also presents statistical analyses of field observations of ground temperatures, ground- and surface water levels, as well as lake and shore morphological variables. Discontinuous permafrost peatlands are heterogeneous environments regarding permafrost distributions and thickness which is manifested in surface systems such as lake geometries. In these environments, lateral groundwater fluxes, which are not considered in most permafrost models, can significantly influence ground temperature dynamics, especially during high groundwater gradient conditions. River discharge data provide a potential for monitoring catchment-scale changes in permafrost, as the magnitude and seasonality of groundwater fluxes feeding into streams are affected by the distribution of permafrost. This thesis highlights the need to understand water and permafrost as an integrated system with potential internal feedback processes. For example, permafrost thaw can lead to increases in groundwater discharge which in turn can lead to increased heat transfer through the ground, resulting in further acceleration of permafrost thaw rates. 

  • 8.
    Sjöberg, Ylva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Coon, Ethan
    Sannel, A. Britta K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Pannetier, Romain
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Harp, Dylan
    Frampton, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Painter, Scott L.
    Lyon, Steve W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Thermal effects of groundwater flow through subarctic fens - a case study based on field observations and numerical modelingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Sjöberg, Ylva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Coon, Ethan
    Sannel, A. Britta K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Pannetier, Romain
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Harp, Dylan
    Frampton, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Painter, Scott L.
    Lyon, Steve W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Thermal effects of groundwater flow through subarctic fens: A case study based on field observations and numerical modeling2016In: Water resources research, ISSN 0043-1397, E-ISSN 1944-7973, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 1591-1606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modeling and observation of ground temperature dynamics are the main tools for understanding current permafrost thermal regimes and projecting future thaw. Until recently, most studies on permafrost have focused on vertical ground heat fluxes. Groundwater can transport heat in both lateral and vertical directions but its influence on ground temperatures at local scales in permafrost environments is not well understood. In this study we combine field observations from a subarctic fen in the sporadic permafrost zone with numerical simulations of coupled water and thermal fluxes. At the Tavvavuoma study site in northern Sweden, ground temperature profiles and groundwater levels were observed in boreholes. These observations were used to set up one- and two-dimensional simulations down to 2 m depth across a gradient of permafrost conditions within and surrounding the fen. Two-dimensional scenarios representing the fen under various hydraulic gradients were developed to quantify the influence of groundwater flow on ground temperature. Our observations suggest that lateral groundwater flow significantly affects ground temperatures. This is corroborated by modeling results that show seasonal ground ice melts 1 month earlier when a lateral groundwater flux is present. Further, although the thermal regime may be dominated by vertically conducted heat fluxes during most of the year, isolated high groundwater flow rate events such as the spring freshet are potentially important for ground temperatures. As sporadic permafrost environments often contain substantial portions of unfrozen ground with active groundwater flow paths, knowledge of this heat transport mechanism is important for understanding permafrost dynamics in these environments.

  • 10.
    Sjöberg, Ylva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Frampton, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Lyon, Steve W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Using streamflow characteristics to explore permafrost thawing in northern Swedish catchments2012In: Hydrogeology Journal, ISSN 1431-2174, E-ISSN 1435-0157, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 121-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent and rapid warming of the Arcticleads to thawing of permafrost, which influences andchanges subsurface water-flow systems in such landscapes.This study explores the utility of catchments as“sentinels of change” by considering long-term dischargedata from 17 stations on unregulated rivers in northernSweden and analyzing trends in annual minimum dischargeand recession flow characteristics. For the catchmentsconsidered, the annual minimum discharge hasincreased significantly (based on the Mann Kendall test ata 95% confidence level) in nine of the catchments anddecreased significantly in one catchment. Consideringchanges in recession-flow characteristics, seven catchmentsshowed significant trends consistent with permafrostthawing while two catchments showed significanttrends in the opposite direction. These results aremechanistically consistent with generic physically basedmodeling studies and the geological setting, as thecatchments considered span the spatial limit of permafrostextent. This study illuminates the potential for usinghydrologic observations to monitor changes in catchmentscalepermafrost. Further, this opens the door for researchto isolate the mechanisms behind the different trendsobserved and to gauge their ability to reflect actualpermafrost conditions at the catchment scale.

  • 11.
    Sjöberg, Ylva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Gomach, Sarah
    Kwiatkowski, Evan
    Mansoz, Mathilde
    Involvement of local Indigenous peoples in Arctic research - expectations, needs and challenges perceived by early career researchers2019In: Arctic science, ISSN 2368-7460, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 27-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rapid changes in the natural and social environments of the Arctic region have led to increased scientific presence across the Arctic. Simultaneously, the importance of involving local Indigenous peoples in research activities is increasingly recognized for several reasons, including knowledge sharing and sustainable development. This study explores Arctic early career researchers' (ECRs) perceptions on involving local Indigenous peoples in their research. The results, based on 108 online survey respondents from 22 countries, show that ECRs value the knowledge of local Indigenous peoples and generally wish to extend the involvement of this group in their research. ECRs in North America and in the social sciences have more experience working with Indigenous communities and value it more than researchers in the Nordic area and in the natural sciences. Respondents cited more funding, networking opportunities, and time as the main needs for increasing collaborations. The results of this study are helpful for developing strategies to build good relationships between scientists and Indigenous peoples and for increasing the involvement of Arctic Indigenous peoples in science and engagement of their knowledge systems. The complementary views from Arctic Indigenous peoples are, however, needed for a full understanding of how to effectively achieve this.

  • 12.
    Sjöberg, Ylva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Hugelius, Gustaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Kuhry, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Thermokarst Lake Morphometry and Erosion Features in Two Peat Plateau Areas of Northeast European Russia2013In: Permafrost and Periglacial Processes, ISSN 1045-6740, E-ISSN 1099-1530, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 75-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-resolution satellite remote sensing analysis (n=637 lakes) and field measurements (n=29 lakes) of two peat plateau areas in northeast European Russia were carried out to investigate lake morphology, map shoreline erosion indicators and assess possible orientation patterns in lake and shore morphology. The study includes the first detailed characterisation of the shape and size of thermokarst lakes in organic terrain. The area covered by lakes is 7.0 per cent and 13.6 per cent, and median lake size is 184m2 and 265m2, respectively, for the two study areas. In both areas, most lakes have a similar northwest to southeast orientation, and shores most commonly face northeast or southwest. The shores are generally steeper and have more cracks and lake depths are greater along shores facing northeast or southeast, and along the shorelines of larger lakes. Shores with a peat substrate are more heterogeneous than those with a mineral substrate in terms of steepness, cracks and water depths. Since the lakes are generally small, the shoreline/area ratio is high and a large part of the peat plateau areas can potentially be affected by shoreline erosion.

  • 13.
    Sjöberg, Ylva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Marklund, Per
    Pettersson, Rickard
    Lyon, Steve W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Geophysical mapping of palsa peatland permafrost2015In: The Cryosphere, ISSN 1994-0416, E-ISSN 1994-0424, Vol. 9, p. 465-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Permafrost peatlands are hydrological and biogeochemicalhotspots in the discontinuous permafrost zone.Non-intrusive geophysical methods offer a possibility tomap current permafrost spatial distributions in these environments.In this study, we estimate the depths to the permafrosttable and base across a peatland in northern Sweden,using ground penetrating radar and electrical resistivitytomography. Seasonal thaw frost tables (at 0.5m depth),taliks (2.1–6.7m deep), and the permafrost base (at 16mdepth) could be detected. Higher occurrences of taliks werediscovered at locations with a lower relative height of permafrostlandforms, which is indicative of lower ground icecontent at these locations. These results highlight the addedvalue of combining geophysical techniques for assessing spatialdistributions of permafrost within the rapidly changingsporadic permafrost zone. For example, based on a back-ofthe-envelope calculation for the site considered here, we estimatedthat the permafrost could thaw completely within thenext 3 centuries. Thus there is a clear need to benchmark currentpermafrost distributions and characteristics, particularlyin under studied regions of the pan-Arctic.

  • 14. Sterte, Elin Jutebring
    et al.
    Johansson, Emma
    Sjöberg, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Karlsen, Reinert Huseby
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Groundwater-surface water interactions across scales in a boreal landscape investigated using a numerical modelling approach2018In: Journal of Hydrology, ISSN 0022-1694, E-ISSN 1879-2707, Vol. 560, p. 184-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Groundwater and surface-water interactions are regulated by catchment characteristics and complex inter- and intra-annual variations in climatic conditions that are not yet fully understood. Our objective was to investigate the influence of catchment characteristics and freeze-thaw processes on surface and groundwater interactions in a boreal landscape, the Krycklan catchment in Sweden. We used a numerical modelling approach and sub-catchment evaluation method to identify and evaluate fundamental catchment characteristics and processes. The model reproduced observed stream discharge patterns of the 14 sub-catchments and the dynamics of the 15 groundwater wells with an average accumulated discharge error of 1% (15% standard deviation) and an average groundwater-level mean error of 0.1 m (0.23 m standard deviation). We show how peatland characteristics dampen the effect of intense rain, and how soil freeze-thaw processes regulate surface and groundwater partitioning during snowmelt. With these results, we demonstrate the importance of defining, understanding and quantifying the role of landscape heterogeneity and sub-catchment characteristics for accurately representing catchment hydrological functioning.

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