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  • 1.
    Wulff, Cornelia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bodin-Danielsson, Christina
    Arkitektur, Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan.
    Ability and job satisfaction across occupational area and occupational levelManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the impact of childhood general mental ability on adult job satisfaction using a longitudinal sample of about 1 000 women and men followed from age 10 to age 48. Differences were examined with respect to both general mental ability and job satisfaction between different occupational levels and occupational areas, as was the relationship between ability and job satisfaction within the different occupational levels and areas. Results show that general mental ability and job satisfaction vary between different occupational levels and areas. Some tendencies towards linear relationships and interactions were found.The interaction effects were shown between occupational level and gender. The results indicated that childhood general mental ability may contribute to a self-selection into adult working life, which, in turn, has implications for long-term health.

  • 2.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. The Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Sweden.
    Aesthetics Versus Function in Office Architecture: Employees' Perception of the Workplace2015In: Nordic Journal of Architectural Research, ISSN 1236-6064, E-ISSN 1893-5281, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 11-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the influence of the aesthetic and functional dimensions of architecture on office employees’ perceptions of their own workplace and organization. It is motivated by the lack of architectural research on employees’ identification with, and emotions related to, workplaces and organizations. Hereby potentially important insights have the chance to emerge that otherwise would not do so.

    An explorative approach is taken to investigate the ways that: 1) type of office, 2) different dimensions of architecture, and 3) architectural quality play in influencing employees’ perceptions of their workplaces and organizations. The sample consists of nineteen in-depth interviews with employees working in different types of offices and employed by varying organizations of different sizes.

    Results show that employee’s office category has several impacts, e.g. if the employee’s workplace focus is on work itself, the social life among employees, or the physical environment at work. When workplace focus is on the physical environment, the employees emphasize the aesthetic more than functional dimensions of the space, which are only in focus when the proximate work environment is discussed. Most importantly, the aesthetic dimensions appear to influence both the employee’s perception of their workplace and the organization as a whole.

  • 3.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    An explorative review of the Lean office concept2013In: Journal of Corporate Real Estate, ISSN 1463-001X, E-ISSN 1479-1048, Vol. 15, no 3/4, p. 167-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The concept of Lean office design has emerged, claiming to support an efficient labour process. This article aims to investigate how the two main perspectives identified in the Lean office: the neo-Tayloristic approach and the team-based approach, based in different historical backgrounds, use the office design to shorten lead time and free up time.

    Design/methodology/approach – An extensive review is done in the article of what the Lean office concept means for different research areas and to practitioners.

    Findings – The study presents the two Lean office perspectives in relation to each other, something that has not been done before since it is only recently the team-based Lean office was introduced. The study also presents possible risk and benefits of two perspectives from an employee and organizational perspective.

    Research limitations/implications – Since this is a first exploratory review of the Lean office concept based on theories and examples from design practice, further empirical studies are needed to determine risks and benefits of the concept.

    Practical implications – The clarifying examples in the article make it useful for people involved in the design and building process of offices.

    Originality/value – The article brings together the fields of labour process, office research and facility management with the design practice and presents the two perspectives Lean office design in relation to each other, which has not been done before since the team-based Lean office has only recently been introduced.

  • 4.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Are you sitting comfortably? Office design and worker wellbeing2014In: Safety Management, ISSN 1069-2118, Vol. 16, p. 17-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Seddigh, Aram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Concentration requirements modify the effect of office type on indicators of health and performance2014In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 38, p. 167-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the interaction between need for concentration on the job and six office types in relation to distraction, cognitive stress, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, personal efficiency and general health. 1241 employees from five organizations participated in the study. Cell offices were associated with lower reported levels of distraction and cognitive stress, and flex offices with lower distraction, among the employees compared with all other open-plan office types. There were no significant differences in the outcome variables between different types of open-plan offices. However, there was an interaction between office type and the need for concentration for the job; employees in the high need for concentration group reported more distraction in all office types except in cell offices and also more cognitive stress in all office types except cell offices and flex offices. In conclusion, cell offices may be preferable for tasks that require higher need for concentrations.

  • 6.
    Seddigh, Aram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jönsson, Fredrik U.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Effect of variation in noise absorption in open-plan office: A field study with a cross-over design2015In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 44, p. 34-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Noise has repeatedly been shown to be one of the most recurrent reasons for complaints in open-plan office environments. The aim of the present study was to investigate if enhanced or worsened sound absorption in open-plan offices is reflected in the employees' ratings of disturbances, cognitive stress, and professional efficacy. Employees working on two different floors of an office building were followed as three manipulations were made in room acoustics on each of the two floors by means of less or more absorbing tiles & wall absorbents. For one of the floors, the manipulations were from better to worse to better acoustical conditions, while for the other the manipulations were worse to better to worse. The acoustical effects of these manipulations were assessed according to the new ISO-standard (ISO-3382-3, 2012) for open-plan rooms acoustics. In addition, the employees responded to questionnaires after each change. Our analyses showed that within each floor enhanced acoustical conditions were associated with lower perceived disturbances and cognitive stress. There were no effects on professional efficiency. The results furthermore suggest that even a small deterioration in acoustical room properties measured according to the new ISO-standard for open-plan office acoustics has a negative impact on self-rated health and disturbances. This study supports previous studies demonstrating the importance of acoustics in work environments and shows that the measures suggested in the new ISO-standard can be used to adequately differentiate between better and worse room acoustics in open plan offices.

  • 7.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Wulff, Cornelia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Is perception of leadership influenced by office environment?2013In: Journal of Corporate Real Estate, ISSN 1463-001X, E-ISSN 1479-1048, Vol. 15, no 3/4, p. 194-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This explorative study aims to examine the impact of office type on employees' perception of managerial leadership, a largely unexplored area. A gender perspective is applied to examine whether women and men perceive leadership differently in different office types.

    Design/methodology/approach – Cross-sectional study is based on 5,358 office employees from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Study of Health in 2010. The employees worked in the seven different office types identified in contemporary office design: cell-offices, shared-room offices, small open plan offices, medium-sized open plan offices, large open plan offices, flex-offices, and combi-offices. Cell-office was used as reference in the analysis.

    Findings – Poorer ratings of leadership were found in shared-room offices, and better in medium-sized open plan offices. A tendency towards a gender difference in perceived leadership was found only in small open plan offices, which appear to be better for men and worse for women.

    Practical implications – The results suggest that the office environment has an influence on perceived managerial leadership. This means office design should be considered in relation to leadership style in order for an organization to be successful.

    Originality/value – To the authors' knowledge, no other study has investigated the relationship between office environment and managerial leadership.

  • 8.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Lean i arbetslivet: Lean inom kontorsdesign2013In: Lean i arbetslivet / [ed] Per Sederblad, Stockholm: Liber, 2013, 1, p. 162-189Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    L'impact de la conception architecturale des bureaux sur le confort et le bien-être desemployés (Eng. The impact of architectural design offices in the comfort andwell-being of employees): Le confort au travail : Quenous apprend la psychologie environnementale? (Eng. Comfort at work: What canwe learn from environmental psychology?)2013In: L'impact de la conception architecturale des bureaux sur le confort et le bien-être desemployés / [ed] L. Rioux, J. Le Roy, L. Rubens & J. Le Conte, Quebec City,Canada: Presses Universitaires de Laval , 2013, 1, p. 17-39Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Chungkham, Holendro Singh
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Wulff, Cornelia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Office design's impact on sick leave rates:  2014In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 139-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of office type on sickness absence among office employees was studied prospectively in 1852 employees working in (1) cell-offices; (2) shared-room offices; (3) small, (4) medium-sized and (5) large open-plan offices; (6) flex-offices and (7) combi-offices. Sick leaves were self-reported two years later as number of (a) short and (b) long (medically certified) sick leave spells as well as (c) total number of sick leave days. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used, with adjustment for background factors. A significant excess risk for sickness absence was found only in terms of short sick leave spells in the three open-plan offices. In the gender separate analysis, this remained for women, whereas men had a significantly increased risk in flex-offices. For long sick leave spells, a significantly higher risk was found among women in large open-plan offices and for total number of sick days among men in flex-offices. Practitioner Summary: A prospective study of the office environment's effect on employees is motivated by the high rates of sick leaves in the workforce. The results indicate differences between office types, depending on the number of people sharing workspace and the opportunity to exert personal control as influenced by the features that define the office types.

  • 11.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. School of Architecture, School of Architecture & Built Environment, The Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Office type's association to employees' welfare: Three studies2016In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 779-790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The workplace is important for employees' daily life and well-being. This article investigates exploratory the office design's role for employees' welfare from different perspectives.

    OBJECTIVE: By comparing different studies of the office, type's influence on different factors of employees' welfare the aim is to see if any common patterns exist in office design's impact.

    METHODS: The three included studies investigate office type's association with employees' welfare by measuring its influence on: a) perception of leadership, b) sick leave, and c) job satisfaction.The sample consists of office employees from a large, national representative work environment survey that work in one of the seven identified office types in contemporary office design: (1) cell-offices; (2) shared-room offices; (3) small, (4) medium-sized and (5) large open-plan offices; (6) flex-offices and (7) combi-offices. Statistical method used is multivariate logistic and linear regression analysis with adjustment for background factors.

    RESULTS: Overall results show that shared-room office, traditional open plan offices and flex-office stand out negatively, but to different degree(s) on the different outcomes measured.

    CONCLUSIONS: This explorative comparison of different studies finds a pattern of office types that repeatedly show indications of negative influence on employees' welfare, but further studies are needed to clarify this.

  • 12.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    The impact of office design on the view of management2015In: Work & place, ISSN 2306-6504, no 5, p. 35-39Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. The Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Wulff, Cornelia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Theorell, Töres
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    The relation between office type and workplace conflict: A gender and noise perspective2015In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 42, p. 161-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This exploratory study aimed to investigate the impact of the office design on workplace conflicts, with a special attention to noise in the office. A gender perspective was applied. The sample consisted of 5229 employees from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health 2010 (SLOSH), working in different office types. In the multivariate analysis office type was used as the explanatory variable with adjustments for age, supervisory position and labour market sector. Analysis stratified for gender was used. Among women a significant impact of office type per se on workplace conflicts was found, but not among men. For women several office types differed significantly from the cell-office with regard to prevalence of conflicts during the past two years, but for men only the combi-office differed from the cell-office. Noise had an impact on workplace conflicts, but is not the only explanatory factor since the effect of office type remained also after adjustment for noise in multivariate analyses. Other environmental factors inherent in the office type might thus explain the occurrence of conflicts.

  • 14.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Vad är ett bra kontor?: olika perspektiv på Sveriges vanligaste arbetsplats2014 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1 - 14 of 14
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