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  • 1.
    Nilsson, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    False Friends and Their Influence on Sign Language Interpreting.2005In: Advances in Teaching Sign Language Interpreters, Washington DC: Gallaudet University Press: Washington D.C. , 2005, p. 170-186Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Nilsson, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Form and discourse function of the pointing toward the chest in Swedish Sign Language2004In: Sign Language and Linguistics, ISSN 1387-9316, E-ISSN 1569-996X, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 3-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The object of this study is a sign glossed index-c, a point toward the signer’s chest, and its use in Swedish Sign Language. The sign has often been referred to as the first person pronoun of Swedish Sign Language, and it has been claimed that index-c is only used for non-first person reference in reported speech (Wallin 1987; Ahlgren 1991; Simper-Allen 1999). In the analyzed material, however, index-c is also used for non-first person reference when the actions and thoughts of a referent are rendered. A closer look also made it clear that there are actually two different forms of index-c, with different distribution, and that there appears to be an indefinite pronoun in Swedish Sign Language. What is presented here is thus an analysis of the use and meaning of two forms of the sign that was initially glossed index-c.

  • 3.
    Nilsson, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Real Space blends in Swedish Sign Language as an indicator of discourse complexity in relation to interpreting2010In: Studies in Swedish Sign Language: Reference, Real Space Blending, and Interpretation, Stockholm: Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Nilsson, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Spatial Strategies in Descriptive Discourse: Use of Signing Space in Swedish Sign Language2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the use of signing space, especially the potential relationship between the structure and function of the discourse. Data comes from a ten minute long, descriptive Swedish Sign Language monologue, where the signer retells parts of an autobiography. A native signer, who has not read the book, is sitting next to the camera as the addressee. This video recording was originally made for testing the interpreting skills of a group of professional sign language interpreters, and the signer did not know at the time that her signing would be the object of analysis. As the book she has read has both a main character and several other animate referents, the discourse contains frequent reference to these persons, and to their feelings, opinions, actions, and interactions. The general theoretical framework is that of Cognitive Linguistics, in particular Real Space blending (Liddell, 2003). The discourse is characterized by a complex interaction between discourse content and the signer’s use of signing space. Providing background and orienting material regarding the author, the signer uses the area to her left for meaningfully directed signs. In contrast, rendering the life of the author, as described in the book, the area in front of the signer is used for meaningfully directed signs. In sequences told from narrator’s perspective, in which signs are typically directed to the left, token blends dominate. In sequences with rapid switching between narrator’s perspective and discourse character’s perspective, signs are directed forward. Such sequences also abound with rapid switching between token blends and surrogate blends. Moreover, in token spaces containing more than one token, the tokens are frequently stacked in one area in signing space, rather than on opposite sides. Surrogates turn out to be used not only for constructed dialogue, but also for constructed action and thought, even for referents that are non-specific. The functionality of indexing in this discourse will also be discussed in some detail in this volume.

  • 5.
    Nilsson, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Studies in Swedish Sign Language: Reference, Real Space Blending, and Interpretation2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis comprises four separate studies of the same material: a ten-minute Swedish Sign Language monologue. Study I describes the form, meaning, and use of the sign INDEX-c, a pointing toward the chest traditionally described as a first person pronoun. It is argued that INDEX-c is used not only with specific reference to the signer or a quoted signer, but also with non-specific reference. Contrary to what has been reported, INDEX-c is used not only for constructed dialogue, but also in constructed action. The analysis reveals two separate forms, as well, labeled as reduced INDEX-c and distinct INDEX-c, respectively. Study II describes the activities of the non-dominant hand when it is not part of a two-handed sign. A continuum is suggested, moving from different rest positions that do not contribute to the discourse content, via mirroring of the dominant hand, for example, to instances where the non-dominant hand produces signs of its own while the dominant hand remains inactive, i.e. dominance reversal. Several of the activities of the non-dominant hand, including the four types of buoys that are described, help structure the discourse by indicating the current topic. Study III uses Mental Space Theory and Conceptual Blending Theory to describe the use of signing space for reference. A correlation is shown between discourse content and the area in the signing space toward which signs are meaningfully directed, and also between these directions and which types of Real Space blends the signer mainly uses: token blends or surrogate blends. Finally Study IV looks in more detail at three segments of the discourse and their Real Space blend structure. An initial analysis of eight interpretations into spoken Swedish is also conducted, focusing on whether preselected content units (discourse entities and relations) are identified. A large number of Real Space blends and blended entities are argued to result in less successful renditions measured in terms of preselected content units.

  • 6.
    Nilsson, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    The new challenge: interpreting what was never said2011In: Synergy: Moving Forward Together: efsli 2010 Conference Proceedings / [ed] Christopher Stone and Robert Adam, European Forum of Sign Language Interpreters , 2011, p. 6-18Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As signed language interpreters we usually work between one spoken language and one signed. These two types of language differ in many aspects, possibly the most noticeable being the fact that in signed languages signs can be meaningfully directed in space. According to earlier research you have to identify referents before you can use ”placement”, ”role shift”, ”verb agreement”, etc. Recent research on several signed languages, however, has shown that a signer does not have to identify a person or a thing before talking about what he/she/it does. Instead, the addressee uses several types of knowledge that are common to him/her and the signer to identify the referents. In this paper we will look at an actual example of signed discourse, and discuss how we identify referents when no lexical sign has been produced to help us. Do we always have the same knowledge as the signer (or the speaker) and the addressee? If not, how can we do our job? We will discuss the types of knowledge signed language interpreters need to be equipped with in order to produce accurate interpretations as well as how to get access to this knowledge.

  • 7.
    Nilsson, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    The new challenge: interpreting what was never said2012In: Developing the Interpreter; Developing the Profession: Proceedings of the ASLI Conference 2010 / [ed] Jules Dickinson, Christopher Stone, Coleford, Gloucestershire: Douglas McLean Publishing , 2012, p. 28-38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As signed language interpreters we usually work between one spoken language and one signed. These two types of language differ in many aspects, possibly the most noticeable being the fact that in signed languages signs can be meaningfully directed in space. According to earlier research you have to identify referents before you can use ”placement”, ”role shift”, ”verb agreement”, etc. Recent research on several signed languages, however, has shown that a signer does not have to identify a person or a thing before talking about what he/she/it does. Instead, the addressee uses several types of knowledge that are common to him/her and the signer to identify the referents. In this paper we will look at an actual example of signed discourse, and discuss how we identify referents when no lexical sign has been produced to help us. Do we always have the same knowledge as the signer (or the speaker) and the addressee? If not, how can we do our job? We will discuss the types of knowledge signed language interpreters need to be equipped with in order to produce accurate interpretations as well as how to get access to this knowledge.

  • 8.
    Nilsson, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    The non-dominant hand in a Swedish Sign Language Discourse2007In: Simultaneity in Signed Languages: Form and Function / [ed] Vermeerbergen, M., Leeson. L, Crasborn, O, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company , 2007, p. 163-185Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Signed language users can draw on a range of articulators when expressing linguistic messages, including the hands, torso, eye gaze, and mouth. Sometimes these articulators work in tandem to produce one lexical item while in other instances they operate to convey different types of information simultaneously. Over the past fifteen years, there has been a growing interest in the issue of simultaneity in signed languages. However, this book is the first to offer a comprehensive treatment of this topic, presenting a collection of papers dealing with different aspects of simultaneity in a range of related and unrelated signed languages, in descriptive and cross-linguistic treatments which are set in different theoretical frameworks. This volume has relevance for those interested in sign linguistics, in teaching and learning signed languages, and is also highly recommended to anyone interested in the fundamental underpinnings of human language and the effects of signed versus spoken modality.

  • 9.
    Nilsson, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Third Language Interpreting:: From Necessity Towards Perfection.2009Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Nilsson, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Undervisning i kognitiv teckenspråksteori: analys och ett förslag till utveckling.2012Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Under de senaste tio åren har forskningen om svenskt teckenspråk, och i förlängningen även undervisningen i ämnet ’Teckenspråk’ kommit att få en delvis förändrad teoretisk förankring och inriktning. I flera avseenden har den tidigare basen i generativ lingvistik gradvis övergivits, och olika delar av kognitiv lingvistik har istället kommit att tillämpas.

    Det framgår klart av såväl kursvärderingar som diskussioner med studenterna att vissa begrepp inom kognitiv lingvistik, och att tillämpa dem, upplevs som särskilt problematiska. Då mycket ny, intressant forskning (såväl i Sverige som utomlands) sker inom denna teoretiska inriktning är det samtidigt angeläget att våra studenter tillägnar sig kunskap om den. Det är därför viktigt att vi hittar sätt att göra kursernas innehåll mer lättillgängligt.

    Med utgångspunkt i detta behandlas följande frågeställningar:

    • Vilka tröskelbegrepp och/eller vilken ”besvärlig kunskap” möter våra studenter i kurserna ’Kognitiv teckenspråksteori I’ och ’Kognitivi teckenspråksteori II’?
    • Vilka undervisningsformer och vilken typ av feedback kan på bästa sätt hjälpa studenterna förbi dessa hinder?
    • Hur kan kurserna på bästa sätt hjälpa studenter till en utveckling mot self-regulated learning?

    I detta PM analyseras och problematiseras undervisningspraktiska frågeställningar inom ämnet utifrån aktuell universitetspedagogisk forskning och handbokslitteratur. Desutom identifieras pedagogiska utvecklingsområden och jag ger förslag på lösningar som kan förbättra studenters lärande i ämnet.

  • 11.
    Nilsson, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Use of signing space in simultanous sign language interpretation: Marking discourse structure with the body2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fundamental difference between signed and spoken languages is that in signed languages the signer uses the three dimensional space in front of him/her (signing space) and his/her own body for reference and cohesion. According to recent studies of signed languages (e.g. Liddell, 2003; Liddell, Vogt-Svendsen & Bergman, 2007; Nilsson, 2010; Dudis, 2011; Ferrara, 2011; Thumann, 2011) such linguistic tools make use of the conceptual blending process (Fauconnier & Turner, 2002).

    Optimal use of signing space is dependent on the signer’s knowledge of what s/he is going to talk about. In a simultaneous interpreting situation, both the content and the structure of the discourse become known to the interpreter only gradually. Thus, it is difficult for an interpreter working simultaneously into a signed language to know how to best structure the discourse, as there is no way s/he can know exactly what the speaker will say next. To date, there are only a few studies regarding use of signing space in simultaneously interpreted signed language (see, however, e.g. Frasu, 2007; Nicodemus, 2009; Armstrong, 2011; Goswell, 2011).

    In the present study, Swedish Sign Language (SSL) interpreters have been filmed when interpreting from spoken Swedish into SSL. Both interpreters whose first language is SSL (L1 interpreters) and those who are second language learners of SSL (L2 interpreters) have been recorded. Their signed language production is studied using a model based in Conceptual Blending Theory, and mainly analyzing use of Real Space Blending (Liddell, 2003), focusing on how they use signing space and their body to mark the discourse structure. Does the interpreting situation make interpreters use fewer of the linguistic tools available, or use them differently than in spontaneously produced SSL (as described in e.g. Bergman, 2007; Nilsson, 2010; Sikström, 2011)?

    The unexpected findings of a preliminary analysis indicate striking differences both in how and how much the recorded L1 and L2 interpreters use their body, especially regarding the use of movements of the upper body. In this presentation, I will show how the L1 interpreters structure the discourse content using buoys and tokens (Liddell, 2003) in a highly visual interplay with body movements. Buoys and tokens are combined with e.g. sideway movements and rotations of the upper body, thereby marking the structure of the discourse. The L1 interpreters move their upper body in a manner that gives a relaxed and natural impression, frequently e.g. raising their shoulders as part of sign production. Despite finding out the discourse content only gradually, and while already rendering their interpretation of what has been said so far, they manage to produce signed discourse that is strikingly similar to spontaneously produced SSL discourse. In comparison, as we will see, the L2 interpreters generally move their upper body less, and they use fewer buoys and tokens. Their use of directions in signing space to indicate e.g. contrast and/or comparisons is more stereotypical, and their body movements do not reflect the structure of the discourse to the same extent.

  • 12.
    Nilsson, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Schönström, Krister
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Swedish as a Second Language for the Deaf.
    Swedish Sign Language as a Second Language: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives2014In: Teaching and Learning Signed Languages: International Perspectives and Practices / [ed] David McKee, Russell S. Rosen & Rachel McKee, Basingstoke: Palgrave , 2014, p. 11-34Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter provides historical perspective on the teaching and learning of Swedish Sign Language (SSL) as a second language (L2).We describe the development of teaching of SSL,and then discuss groups learning SSL as L2: interpreters, hearing parents of deaf children, hearing-impaired (HI) persons, and children with cochlear implants (CI). We provide early results from a pilot study regarding SSL use in the HI and CI group from a L2 perspective. The chapter shows how the context for SSL learning is changing: the number of deaf people acquiring SSL as L1 is decreasing, while the number of people learning SSL as L2 is increasing. We consider implications for the future of SSL and SSL teaching in a changing society.

  • 13.
    Nilsson, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Turner, Graham H.
    Sheikh, Haaris
    Dean, Robyn
    A Prescription for Change: Report on EU Healthcare Provision for Deaf Sign Language Users.2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During 2010-2012, a Leonardo da Vinci-funded EU project focused on enhancing the language skills of Deaf people, interpreters and Health Care Professionals. Project partners from Cyprus, Ireland, Poland, Scotland and Sweden reviewed current knowledge of policy and practice, and embedded the resulting analysis into a programme of materials to support reflection, knowledge and skills development internationally. This report presents the project's initial 'state-of-the-art' review, with particular reference to the partner countries.

  • 14.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, The Institute for Interpretation and Translation Studies.
    Englund Dimitrova, BirgittaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, The Institute for Interpretation and Translation Studies.Nilsson, Anna-LenaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    The Critical Link 4. Professionalisation of interpreting in the community.: Selected papers from the 4th International Conference on Interpreting in Legal, Health and Social Service Settings, Stockholm, Sweden, 20-23 May 20042007Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Wallin, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Nilsson, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Transcription guide lines for Swedish Sign Language discourse. (Version 1)2010Other (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Wallin, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Nilsson, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Transkriptionskonventioner för teckenspråkstexter. (Version 2).2010Other (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Wallin, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Nilsson, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Transkriptionskonventioner för teckenspråkstexter. (Version 3).2011Other (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Wallin, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Mesch, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Nilsson, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Transkriptionskonventioner för teckenspråkstexter. (Version 4).2012Other (Other academic)
1 - 18 of 18
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