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  • 1.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    SUBIC: Stockholm University Brain Imaging Center2014In: Proceedings from FONETIK 2014 Stockholm: Stockholm, June 9-11, 2014 / [ed] Mattias Heldner, Stockholm: Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University , 2014, 133-141 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This contribution presents an outline of SUBIC (Stockholm University Brain Imaging Center, working name). SUBIC is conceived as an interdisciplinary infrastructure that will promote Stockholm University’s participation in international cutting-edge research focusedon the function and the morphologic evolution of the brain.

  • 2.
    Lindblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Sussman, Harvey M.
    Dissecting coarticulation: How locus equations happen2012In: Journal of Phonetics, ISSN 0095-4470, E-ISSN 1095-8576, Vol. 40, no 1, 1-19 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A programmatic series of studies aimed at expanding our understanding of coarticulation in V(1) . CV(2) sequences is presented. The common thread was examining coarticulatory dynamics through the prism of locus equations (LEs). Multiple experimental methodologies (articulatory synthesis, X-ray film, Principal Component Analysis, and extraction of time constants for F2 transitions), guided by a few theoretical assumptions about speech motor planning and control, were used to uncover the articulatory underpinnings responsible for the trademark acoustic form of LE scatterplots. Specific findings were: (1) the concept of a stop consonantal 'target' was quantitatively derived as a vowel-neutral, 'deactivated,' tongue contour; (2) the linearity of LEs is significantly enhanced by the uniformity of F2 transition time constants, which normalize with respect to F2 transition extents, and an inherent linear bias created by the smaller frequency range of [F2(onset) - F2(vowel)] relative to F2(vowel) frequencies; (3) realistic LE slopes and y-intercepts were derived by modeling different extents of V(2) overlap onto stop consonantal target shapes at closure; and (4) a conceptually simple model, viz. interpolation between successive articulatory target shapes, followed by derivation of their formant values expressed as LEs, came surprisingly close to matching actual LEs obtained from our speaker.

  • 3. Hartelius, Lena
    et al.
    Schalling, Ellika
    Krull, Diana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Formant Transitions in Ataxic Speech: The Shape and Speed of Formant Trajectories in Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis and Control Speakers2010In: Journal of medical speech-language pathology, ISSN 1065-1438, Vol. 18, no 4, 54-60 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trying to identify the acoustic bases of reduced intelligibility, investigators have paid special attention to the behavior of the second formant (F2) examining its extent, duration, and rate of change. In theoretical and clinical work, it would be useful to be able to measure speaking rate defined in terms of both movement speed and number of units per second, and to be able to measure the F2 slope independent of an individual's general rate of speech. The present study evaluates a method for numerically specifying the shape and speed of formant trajectories. The procedure consists of fitting damped exponentials to transitions traced from spectrograms, and determining their time constants. The formant transitions of 10 speakers with ataxic dysarthria due to multiple sclerosis (MS) and 10 control speakers, pronouncing the syllables /da:/, /do:/, and /du:/ in a carrier phrase were analyzed. Results showed that the time constants were significantly different in the two groups. Speakers with MS were slower, and given that this measure is independent of speaking rate, we can conclude that the actual articulatory movements were slower. Future research efforts will focus on exploring the formant trajectories in more speakers with varying severities of dysarthria as well as determining the effects of phonetic context, stress, and word length.

  • 4.
    Lindblom, Bjorn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Sussman, Harvey M.
    Agwuele, Augustine
    A Duration-Dependent Account of Coarticulation for Hyper- and Hypoarticulation2009In: Phonetica, ISSN 0031-8388, E-ISSN 1423-0321, Vol. 66, no 3, 188-195 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies investigating anticipatory coarticulation in emphatically stressed CV sequences and during fast speaking rates reported that three factors contributed to the overall extent of the documented coarticulation. These factors were: (1) vowel identity, (2) vowel space expansion (emphasis) or reduction (fast rate), and a hypothesized (3) 'deeper' and 'shallower' stop closure contact in emphatic and faster speech, respectively. The objective of the current research was to conceptually and quantitatively unify these two studies. This was accomplished by showing that the opposite changes to frequency onsets of F2 transitions due to emphatic and rapid speech systematically vary as a function of the durational changes in the stop closure interval. Specifically, the decrease in coarticulation in emphatic speech is characterized by increases in F2 onsets and longer stop closures (relative to a normal baseline); the increase in coarticulation due to rapid speech shows concomitant decreases in F2 onsets coinciding with shorter stop closure intervals. Vocal tract area function simulations corresponding to emphatic and reduced speech implicitly support 'deeper' and 'shallower' closure contacts as a third factor contributing to the overall extent of anticipatory CV coarticulation. 

  • 5.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Laryngeal mechanisms in speech: The contributions of Jan Gauffin2009In: Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology, ISSN 1401-5439, Vol. 34, no 4, 149-156 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Jan Gauffin was an early user of fiber optics which allowed him to discover that laryngeal structures above the glottal level are involved in speech. His research led him to postulate three independently controlled mechanisms: fundamental frequency control, glottal adduction/abduction, and laryngealization,the latter derived from the protective closure function. He argued that phonetic theory must be revised to account for the main phonation types of the world's languages. He saw them as combinations of two interacting dimensions: adduction/abduction and laryngealization. Secondly he gave the aryepiglottic sphincter an explanatory role in accounting for the production of low pitch and downward pitch inflections. During his lifetime his work received limited attention. However, later laryngoscopic research has confirmed and extended his thinking and findings. His contribution was a pioneering one.

  • 6.
    Cortes, Elisabet Eir
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    From articulatory to acoustic parameters non-stop: Phonetics in the fast lane2008In: Proceedings FONETIK 2008Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports an attempt to map the time variations of selected articulatory parameters (from X-ray profiles) directly on the F1, F2 and F3 formant tracks using multiple regression analysis (MRA). The results indicate that MRA can indeed be useful for predicting formant frequencies. Since the results reported here are limited to preliminary observations of F1 only, further studies including F2 and F3 are needed to evaluate the method more definitively.

  • 7.
    Lindblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Diehl, Randy
    Park, Sang-Hoon
    Salvi, Giampiero
    (Re)use of place features in voiced stop systems:: Role of phonetic constraints2008In: Proceedings FONETIK 2008Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Computational experiments focused on place of articulation in voiced stops were designed to

    generate ‘optimal’ inventories of CV syllables from a larger set of ‘possible CV:s’ in the presence

    of independently and numerically defined articulatory, perceptual and developmental

    constraints. Across vowel contexts the most salient places were retroflex, palatal and uvular.

    This was evident from acoustic measurements and perceptual data. Simulation results using

    the criterion of perceptual contrast alone failed to produce systems with the typologically widely

    attested set [b] [d] [g], whereas using articulatory cost as the sole criterion produced inventories

    in which bilabial, dental/alveolar and velar onsets formed the core. Neither perceptual

    contrast, nor articulatory cost, (nor the two combined), produced a consistent re-use of

    place features (‘phonemic coding’). Only systems constrained by ‘target learning’ exhibited

    a strong recombination of place features.

  • 8. Agwuele, Augustine
    et al.
    Sussman, Harvey M
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University.
    The Effect of Speaking Rate on Consonant Vowel Coarticulation2008In: Phonetica, Vol. 65, 1-16 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2007 Lindblom et al. introduced a methodological tool to isentangle consonant-vowel (CV) coarticulation attributable to emphatic stress apart from the vowel expansion effects known to accompany the prosodic overlay. After empirically accounting for the altered vowel positions, they reported small but consistent

    increases in F2 transition onsets in emphatically produced CVs that could not be attributed to vowel context influences, and that differed across stop place. At issue is whether the findings of these authors can be replicated, but in the opposite direction,

    for CVs produced at fast speaking rates. Amodified locus equation regression metric was similarly used to account for rate-induced vowel reduction effects in predicting frequencies of F2 transition onsets in rapid speech. Six American-English speakers

    produced [V1.CV2] sequences embedded in a carrier sentence, at three speaking tempos: normal, fast, and fastest. Significant differences were found between ‘predicted’ and ‘observed’ F2 onsets across stops, with alveolars and velars showing greater decreases in F2 onsets during more rapid speech than labials.The complementary findings are discussed relative to a unified view of anticipatory coarticulation in CV production across a continuum of hyperarticulated spectral expansion to hypoarticulated spectral reduction.

  • 9.
    Lindblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Sundberg, Johan
    Branderud, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Djamshidpey, Hassan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    On the acoustics of spread lips2007In: Proceedings of Fonetik 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In response to our incomplete understanding of how the 3-D geometry of the lips should be modeled in 2-D area functions, we present some measurements made on simplified physical models of the vocal tract. Our main result is that it is possible to match the formant pattern of a notched tube with that of an unnotched tube provided that an increment is added to the length of the unnotched tube. This increment was found to vary systematically with the depth of the notch and, to some extent, also with the size of the tube’s cross-sectional area. We expect these results to be relevant to representing articulations with the mouth corner posterior to the midsagittal anteriormost point of the vocal tract - as in spread vowels, especially when emphatically and emotionally spoken.

  • 10.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Röst- och talfunktion2007In: Logopedi, 2007, 29-35 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur talat språk bildas

    De flesta talljud i jordens språk är expiratoriska, dvs. de produceras med utandningsluften. För det normala talet levererar andningsapparaten en jämn utåtgående luftström, som modifieras av stämbandens rörelser till en serie pulser. I talröret modifieras detta pulserande luftflöde ytterligare av de orala, faryngala och nasala kaviteternas resonansegenskaper. Modern talforskning tillämpar en mycket allmängiltig teori för beskrivning av denna ljudbildningsprocess – den s.k. källa-filter-teorin. Ett mål för detta kapitel är att med utgångspunkt i denna teori försöka ge en bild av hur normal röst och normalt tal fungerar, och hur talaren koordinerar andning, ljudbildning och artikulation för att skapa en akustisk signal, som kan tolkas av en lyssnare med avseende på både språkligt och icke-språkligt innehåll.

  • 11.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Talet - en signal att uppfatta och tolka2007In: Sinnen, signaler och tolkningar av verkligheten, Kungl. Vetenskaps- och Vitterhets-Samhället i Göteborg , 2007, 87-103 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Detta bidrag illustrerar konferensens tema med experimentell forskning om det mänskliga talet. Talkommunikation kan ju studeras ur en mängd synvinklar. I denna framställning betraktar vi talet som ett fysiologiskt, akustiskt och perceptuellt fenomen. Vi beskriver först hur talet bildas fysikaliskt och hur talmotoriken löser sin uppgift att förmedla ett innehåll rikt på både språklig och icke-språklig information. Denna bakgrund ger en ganska komplex bild och föranleder oss att fråga: Hur är det möjligt att talsignaler kan överföra så mycket information trots att budskapet, signalen och omständigheterna varierar starkt när vi talar med varandra? Frågeställningen belyses med experimentella iakttagelser av hur talaren anpassar sig till lyssnaren, och hur lyssnaren i sin tur utnyttjar signaloberoende kunskap i tolkningen av signalen. Vi nämner också något om evolutionen, som sett till att hörseln kan fungera även i störningsfyllda miljöer. Ljudsystemen i jordens språk visar en tydlig anpassning till denna mekanism och bidrar på så sätt till mer robust talkommunikation.

  • 12.
    Lindblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Agwuele, Augustine
    Department of Anthropology, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666.
    Sussman, Harvey M.
    Departments of Linguistics and Communication Sciences & Disorders, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712.
    Cortes, Elisabet Eir
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    The effect of emphatic stress on consonant vowel coarticulation2007In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, ISSN 0001-4966, Vol. 121, no 6, 3802-3813 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assessed the acoustic coarticulatory effects of phrasal accent on [V1.CV2] sequences, when separately applied to V1 or V2, surrounding the voiced stops [b], [d], and [g]. Three adult speakers each produced 360 tokens (six V1 contexts x ten V2 contexts x three stops x two emphasis conditions). Realizing that anticipatory coarticulation of V2 onto the intervocalic C can be influenced by prosodic effects, as well as by vowel context effects, a modified locus equation regression metric was used to isolate the effect of phrasal accent on consonantal F2 onsets,independently of prosodically induced vowel expansion effects. The analyses revealed two main emphasis-dependent effects: systematic differences in F2 onset values and the expected expansion of vowel space. By accounting for the confounding variable of stress-induced vowel space expansion, a small but consistent coarticulatory effect of emphatic stress on the consonant was uncovered in lingually produced stops, but absent in labial stops. Formant calculations based on tube models indicated similarly increased F2 onsets when stressed /d/ and /g/ were simulated with deeper occlusions resulting from more forceful closure movements during phrasal accented speech.

  • 13. Whalen, Doug
    et al.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Biological Basis of Speech2006In: Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics, 2nd edition, Vol. 12, no 27, 61-67 p.Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    The biological basis of speech has three main components: the physiology of the vocal tract, the physiology of the perceptual system (primarily the ear but also the eye and, occasionally, other systems), and the neural resources that allow their use for communication. The genetic underpinnings of these functions are beyond the scope of this article, so the functional aspects will be discussed.

    Speech, like language, is a biological system. Because it is the part of language with a physical realization, the immediacy of the biology is more apparent than it is for syntax and semantics, but it forms a part of that complete biological system. Language is generally considered the defining characteristic of humans, and it will develop in every neurologically normal child with virtually any exposure to linguistic material. The large investment that is made in being able to acquire and use language is justified by the immense rewards for using it, and the severe penalties for being unable to.

  • 14.
    Lindblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Mauk, Claude
    Moon, Seung-Jae
    Dynamic specification of speech and sign2006In: Dynamics of speech production and perception, IOS, Amsterdam , 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensory systems prefer time-varying over static stimuli. An example of this fact is provided by the dynamic spectro-temporal changes of speech signals which are known to play a key role in speech perception. To some investigators such observations provide support for adopting the gesture as the basic entity of speech. An alleged advantage of such a dynamically defined unit - over the more traditional, static and abstract, phoneme or segment - is that it can readily be observed in phonetic records. However, as has been thoroughly documented throughout the last fifty years, articulatory and acoustic measurements are ubiquitously context-dependent. That makes the gesture, defined as an observable, problematic as a primitive of phonetic theory.

    The goal of the present paper is to propose a resolution of the static-dynamic paradox. An analysis of articulatory and sign movement dynamics is presented in terms of a traditional model based on timeless spatial specifications (targets, via points) plus smoothing (as determined by the dynamics of speech effectors). We justify this analysis as follows: A first motivation is empirical: As illustrated in this chapter both articulatory and sign data lend themselves readily to a target-based analysis. The second part of the argument appeals to the principle of parsimony which says: Do not unnecessarily invoke movement to explain movement. Until a deeper understanding is available of how the neuro-mechanical systems of speech contribute to its articulatory and acoustic dynamics, it would seem prudent to put dynamic (gestural) motor commands on hold. Thirdly, if the schema of static-targets plus dynamic-smoothing is an intuitive way of conceptually parsing movements, it is only natural that phoneticians should have given many speech sounds static labels in traditional descriptive frameworks. Static-target control in speech production should in no way be incompatible with dynamic input patterns for perception. Once that fact is acknowledged, there is no paradox.

  • 15.
    Cortes, Elisabet Eir
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Gustavsson, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Phonetics.
    From movements to sound Contributions to building the BB speech production system2006Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In terms of anatomical geometry the infant Vocal Tract undergoes significant change during development. This research note reports an attempt to reconstruct an infant VT from adult data. Comparable landmarks were identified on the fixed structures of adult articulatory lateral profiles (obtained from X-ray images) and matching infant profiles (obtained from published data in the literature, Sobotta [Putz & Pabst 2001, and personal communication from author Prof. Dr. med. R. Pabst]. The x-coordinates of the infant landmarks could be accurately derived by a linear scaling of the adult data whereas the y-values required information on both the x- and the y-coordinates of the adult. These scaling rules were applied to about 400 adult articulatory profiles to derive a set of corresponding infant articulations. A Principal Components Analysis was performed on these shapes to compare the shapes of the infant and adult articulatory spaces. As expected from the scaling results the infant space is significantly compressed in relation to the adult space suggesting that the main articulatory degree of freedom for the child is jaw opening. This finding is in perfect agreement with published descriptions of the phonetics of early vocalizations. 

  • 16.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Rejecting the phonetics/phonology split2006In: Theoretical Linguistics, ISSN 0301-4428, Vol. 32, no 2, 237-243 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Deduce sound structure from language use. Anchor theory construction in the universal conditions under which all speech communication must take place. Start from ‘first principles’ and not circularly from the data to be explained (cf ‘markedness’). At the level of the individual user, model phonological structure, not as autonomous form, but as an emergent organization of phonetic substance acquired by each native speaker in the context of socially shared, ambient knowledge. At the population level, model this knowledge as a use- & user-dependent process that undergoes change along the historical time scale. Get rid of the distinction between “phonological” and “extra-phonological”. Here is a key step: Make the ‘intrinsic content’ an integral part of the theory from scratch. Treat ‘intrinsic content’ as the source that helps generate discrete structure and that constrains both synchronic and diachronic phonological patterning.

  • 17. Modarresi, Golnaz
    et al.
    Sussman, Harvey
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Burlingame, E
    Locus equation encoding of stop place: revisiting the voicing/VOT issue2005In: Journal of Phonetics 33(1) 101-113., Vol. 33, no 1, 101-113 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Lindblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Sussman, Harvey
    Articulatory and acoustic bases of locus equations2004In: Proceedings from FONETIK 2004, 2004, 8-11 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19. Diehl, Randy
    et al.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Explaining the structure of feature and phoneme inventories2004In: Speech Processing in the Auditory System, Springer-Verlag, New York , 2004, 101-162 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20. Modarresi, Golnaz
    et al.
    Sussman, Harvey
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University.
    Burlingame, E
    Stop Place Coding: An Acoustic Study of CV, VC, and CV Sequences2004In: Phonetica, Vol. 61, 2-21 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    The organization of speech movements: Specification of units and modes of control2004In: From sound to sense: 50+ years of discoveries in speech communication, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present paper we will address two issues. First, are the units of speech static targets or dynamically specified gestures? The available evidence favors the conclusion that dynamic signal attributes play an important role in speech perception, However, the perceptual significance of speech dynamics does not compel us to conclude that the input to the speech production system is dynamic (gestural). Parsimony would seem to dictate that dynamic motor commands be put on hold until physiological and biomechanical response characteristics of the speech production system are better understood. Second, are speech units articulatory or perceptual? This is a question that derives from much quoted programmatic statements by Stetson and Jakobson. Evidence is reviewed showing that speech movements, like non-speech actions, are adaptively organized and can be planned so as to facilitate the listener’s task by enhancing the perceptual correlates of phonetic categories. However, there is also data indicating that these categories have a strong isomorphism with articulatory processes. The implication of this conclusion is that the question of where in the speech chain units are best defined may be a spurious one.

  • 22.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    A numerical model of coarticulation based on a Principal Components analysis of tongue shapes2003In: XVth International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Barcelona, Spain, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23. Diehl, Randy
    et al.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Creeger, Carl
    Increasing Realism of Auditory Representations Yields Further Insights into Vowel Phonetics2003In: XVth International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Barcelona, Spain., 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University.
    Patterns of phonetic contrast: Towards a unified explanatory framework2003In: XVth International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Barcelona, Spain., 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25. Moon, Seung-Jae
    et al.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Two experiments on oxygen consumption during speech production: vocal effort and speaking tempo2003In: XVth International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Barcelona, Spain, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Principal components analysis of tongue shapes in symmetrical VCV utterances2002In: Proceedings of FONETIK 2002, 2002, 1-4 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Lindblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Sussman, Harvey
    Modarresi, Golnaz
    Burlingame, E
    The trough effect: Implications for speech motor programming2002In: Phonetica, Vol. 59, 245-262 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Foreword2001In: The role of speech perception in phonology, 2001, vii-xii p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29. Davis, Babs
    et al.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Phonetic variability and Baby Talk2001In: Emerging Cognitive Abilities in Early Infancy, Lawrence Erlbaum, Mahwah NJ , 2001, 135-171 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Lindblom, Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Moon, S-J
    Can the energy costs of speech movements be measured? A preliminary feasibility study2000In: Journal Acoustical Society of Korea, Vol. 19, no 19, 25-32 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Developmental origins of adult phonology The interplay between phonetic emergents and the evolutionary adaptations of sound patterns2000In: Phonetica, ISSN 0031-8388, Vol. 57, no 2-4, 297-314 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Emergent phonology is proposed to promote a new vision of the relationship between phonetics and phonology. By substituting it for the traditional division of labor, we would get away from Chomsky’s ‘inescapable dogma’.

    The distinctions between form/substance and competence/performance should be abandoned having served their historical purpose. There is no split between phonetics and phonology because, from the developmental point of view, phonology remains behavior. Phonology differs qualitatively from phonetics in that it represents a new, more complex and higher level of organization of that behavior. For the child, phonology is not abstract. Its foundation is an emergent patterning of phonetic content. The starting point is the behavior. ‘Structure’ unfolds from it. Therefore the issue of ‘psychological reality’ does not arise. Similarly, explanations need not be limited to post-hoc experimental justifications for postulated formal phenomena but are integrated into the theory’s predictions. Behavioral realism and explanatory adequacy are given free reins.

  • 32.
    Engstrand, Olle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Björsten, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Bruce, Gösta
    Eriksson, Anders
    Hur udda är Viby-i? Experimentella och typologiska observationer2000In: Folkmålsstudier, Vol. 39, 83-95 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 33. Engstrand, Olle
    et al.
    Krull, Diana
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. fonetik.
    Sorting stops by place in acoustic space2000In: Proceedings of FONETIK 2000, 2000, 53-56 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 34. Kuhl, Patricia K
    et al.
    Williams, Karen A
    Lacerda, Francisco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Fonetik.
    Stevens, Kenneth N
    Lindblom, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Fonetik.
    Linguistic experience alters phonetic perception in infants by 6 months of age.1992In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, Vol. 255, no 5044, 606-8 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Linguistic experience affects phonetic perception. However, the critical period during which experience affects perception and the mechanism responsible for these effects are unknown. This study of 6-month-old infants from two countries, the United States and Sweden, shows that exposure to a specific language in the first half year of life alters infants' phonetic perception.

1 - 34 of 34
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