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  • 1. Aksland, Charlotte
    et al.
    Rundgren, Shu-Nu Chang
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    5th-10th-grade in-service teachers' pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) for sustainable development in outdoor environment2019In: Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, ISSN 1472-9679, E-ISSN 1754-0402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers' experiences and attitudes play a critical role in outdoor education. In this study, we aim to explore how 5th-10th-grade (10-15 years-old students) teachers use the natural environment in their teaching practices, with special attention to the link to sustainable development (SD). In total, 42 in-service teachers were invited to participate in the study. The data collection was based on the participating teachers' individual written texts concerning their previous outdoor teaching practices, the link to SD and the related assessments. Based on content analysis, three main themes emerged from the data, including (1) teaching biology/ecology concepts, (2) exploring visible pollution and (3) applying a context- and inquiry-based approach. However, we found that outdoor teaching was scarcely linked to SD. The research results' implications for outdoor education and teachers' professional development are discussed in this paper.

  • 2. Belova, Nadja
    et al.
    Rundgren, Shu-Nu Chang
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Eilks, Ingo
    Advertising and science education: a multi-perspective review of the literature2015In: Studies in science education, ISSN 0305-7267, E-ISSN 1940-8412, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 169-200Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We are living in an increasingly diverse media landscape, with advertising a significant part of this. There appears to be unanimous agreement that the ability to critically examine and make rational decisions about advertising is indispensable for contemporary citizens. Students need to develop critical thinking skills in order to evaluate messages and facts drawn from advertisements in various media. They also need to be familiar with the hidden mechanisms used to create advertisements with the goal of subconsciously influencing consumers. Today, advertising for many products has strong scientific and technological components. However, learning both with and about advertising does not play a prominent role in the science education literature. To date, the use of advertising as educational content is found almost exclusively in the humanities and social sciences, especially language education. On the other hand, there is an extensive body of research on the effects of advertising on children, consumer socialization as well as marketing strategies aimed at young consumers. The results indicate that advertising has a strong impact on children's beliefs and perceptions which already starts at an early stage. Therefore, this paper attempts to analyse the potential use of and learning about advertising in science education. It reviews the available literature, not only from science education, but also from other domains, including non-science subjects, cross-curricular approaches as well as research on the use and effects of advertising in the public arena. The aim is to identify the potential roles advertising might play in the science classroom and to open up new directions for science education research and curriculum development.

  • 3. Bergqvist, Anna
    et al.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The influence of textbooks on teachers’ knowledge of chemical bonding representations relative to students’ difficulties understanding2017In: Research in Science & Technological Education, ISSN 0263-5143, E-ISSN 1470-1138, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 215-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Textbooks are integral tools for teachers’ lessons. Several researchers observed that school teachers rely heavily on textbooks as informational sources when planning lessons. Moreover, textbooks are an important resource for developing students’ knowledge as they contain various representations that influence students’ learning. However, several studies report that students have difficulties understanding models in general, and chemical bonding models in particular, and that students’ difficulties understanding chemical bonding are partly due to the way it is taught by teachers and presented in textbooks.

    Purpose: This article aims to delineate the influence of textbooks on teachers’ selection and use of representations when teaching chemical bonding models and to show how this might cause students’ difficulties understanding.

    Sample: Ten chemistry teachers from seven upper secondary schools located in Central Sweden volunteered to participate in this study.

    Design and methods: Data from multiple sources were collected and analysed, including interviews with the 10 upper secondary school teachers, the teachers’ lesson plans, and the contents of the textbooks used by the teachers.

    Results: The results revealed strong coherence between how chemical bonding models are presented in textbooks and by teachers, and thus depict that textbooks influence teachers’ selection and use of representations for their lessons. As discussed in the literature review, several of the selected representations were associated with alternative conceptions of, and difficulties understanding, chemical bonding among students.

    Conclusions: The study highlights the need for filling the gap between research and teaching practices, focusing particularly on how representations of chemical bonding can lead to students’ difficulties understanding. The gap may be filled by developing teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge regarding chemical bonding and scientific models in general.

  • 4. Bergqvist, Anna
    et al.
    Drechsler, Michal
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Upper Secondary Teachers’ Knowledge for Teaching Chemical Bonding Models2016In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 298-318Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers have shown a growing interest in science teachers' professional knowledge in recent decades. The article focuses on how chemistry teachers impart chemical bonding, one of the most important topics covered in upper secondary school chemistry courses. Chemical bonding is primarily taught using models, which are key for understanding science. However, many studies have determined that the use of models in science education can contribute to students' difficulties understanding the topic, and that students generally find chemical bonding a challenging topic. The aim of this study is to investigate teachers' knowledge of teaching chemical bonding. The study focuses on three essential components of pedagogical content knowledge (PCK): (1) the students' understanding, (2) representations, and (3) instructional strategies. We analyzed lesson plans about chemical bonding generated by 10 chemistry teachers with whom we also conducted semi-structured interviews about their teaching. Our results revealed that the teachers were generally unaware of how the representations of models they used affected student comprehension. The teachers had trouble specifying students' difficulties in understanding. Moreover, most of the instructional strategies described were generic and insufficient for promoting student understanding. Additionally, the teachers' rationale for choosing a specific representation or activity was seldom directed at addressing students' understanding. Our results indicate that both PCK components require improvement, and suggest that the two components should be connected. Implications for the professional development of pre-service and in-service teachers are discussed.

  • 5.
    Burton Mwakabungu, Fika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Teräs, Marianne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Bridging Formal and Informal Learning - Investigating Full-time and Part-time Young Fishers and School Teachers' Viewpoints Concerning Sustainable Fishing2018In: Vocational Education & Training – The World of Work and Teacher Education: Emergent Issues in Research on Vocational Education & Training Vol. 3 / [ed] Petros Gougoulakis, Marianne Teräs, Lázaro Moreno Herrera, Premiss förlag, 2018, p. 150-179Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Evers, Mariele
    Alexandersson, Jan
    Learning about flood risk: comparing the Web-based and physical flood-walk learning environment2015In: Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1609-4913, E-ISSN 1609-4913, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous of sustainable development related challenges are emerging today, e.g. flooding problems. Our group has developed ‘the flood walk’ project since 2010 to convey flood risk knowledge in an authentic context. Considering the limitation of time and space to educate people the flood risk knowledge, we tried to transform the physical flood walk field trip into a Web-based virtual trip. In this study, we aim to examine whether the Web-based flood-walk environment can help participants to achieve the same learning outcome as its authentic counterpart. A total of 65 upper secondary school pupils participated in this study. The results illustrate that a physical experience is irreplaceable, and the importance of providing physical experiences for learners in both formal and informal education needs to be emphasised.

  • 7.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Enhancing science teachers’ professional knowledge on inquiry-based science teaching. 2015In: II IOSTE Eurasian Regional Symposium & Brokerage Event Horizon 2020 – Science with and for Society. / [ed] B. Cavas & G. Cakmakci, Istanbul: Bahcesehir University , 2015, p. 30-30Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inquiry-based science education (IBSE) has been addressed in science education internationally during the past decades, and the new Swedish curriculum from 2011 also emphasize the need to develop students’ inquiry skills. However, to what extent school teachers in Sweden have developed their professional knowledge on IBSE has only been focused in a small number of studies in Sweden and it was found that in-service teachers were not well-informed about the ideas of IBSE (Lunde, Rundgren, & Chang Rundgren, 2015). Therefore, in the PROFILES project in Sweden, we could create time and space for in-service teachers to develop and reflect on IBSE. The purpose of this presentation is to share our experiences on the development of PROFILES with in-service science teachers (primary and lower secondary school levels) in Sweden during year 2012 to 2014. A model termed context-inquiry-assessment (CIA) continuously professional development (CPD) is introduced in the presentation together with suggestions on different teacher professional development approaches (e.g. design-based, learning study and action research) (Chang Rundgren, in press) as well as the detailed professional reflection on pedagogical content knowledge (PCK).  

     

     

    References

       Lunde, T., Rundgren, C-J, Chang Rundgren, S. N. (2015) När läroplan och tradition möts – hur högstadielärare bemöter yttre förväntningar på undersökande arbete i naturämnesundervisningen. NorDiNa (Nordic Studies in Science Education) 11(1) 88-101.

    Lunde, T. (2014). När läroplan och tradition möts. Om lärarfortbildning och undersökande aktiviteters syfte inom den laborativa NO-undervisningen i grundskolans senare del. Licentiate Thesis. Karlstad University Studies 2014:42. ISBN 978-91-7063-577-9

     

  • 8.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Making chemistry education relevant through mass media.2015In: Relevant Chemistry Education – From Theory to Practice / [ed] Ingo Eilks and Avi Hofstein, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 2015, 1, p. 205-218Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In today’s society, mass media plays an important role in our life. In addition toschool education, people receive scientific knowledge from mass media to a greatextent. Within chemistry, the information, for example, concerning food chemistry,crime investigation, environmental toxins and local mining issues, pervades massmedia. Today, all the above-mentioned issues are termed socio-scientific issues(SSI), which are seen as suitable contexts to promote scientific literacy and citizeneducation in the global age. In addition to the importance of noticing the emergingSSI in mass media, both of SSI and media have been found useful in enhancingstudents’ learning in sciences, especially at the moment of facing the presentphenomenon concerning students’ low interest in science revealed internationally,in particular among developed countries (e.g. Sweden). Therefore, it is a majortask now for us, as science educators, to put effort on motivating students’ interestin science, and we believe the combination of SSI and mass media can enhancestudents’ interest through making science relevant. In this chapter, the importanceof SSI-based teaching linking to the meaning of relevance is introduced as a visionthat science teachers need to be aware of and develop further. Further, we arguewhy mass media can contribute to making chemistry education relevant forstudents based on research evidence. Two examples of SSI-teaching approaches,based on local SSI topics discussed in mass media in Taiwan and Sweden, arepresented to benefit teaching practices. The implication to teacher education isalso discussed.

  • 9.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Pre-service teachers’ awareness on the teaching strategies involving socioscientific issues, inquiry-based science education to enhance socioscientific inquiry-based learning.2016In: ERIDOB 2016: Eleventh Conference of European Researchers in Didactics of Biology, 2016, p. 73-73Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Together with Inquiry-Based Science Education (IBSE), teaching and learning about SocioScientifis Issues (SSI) and the related argumentation skill (termed informal ar-gumentation or SSI-argumentation) are emerging and hot research topics in science education internationally during the past decades. Embedding the four important concepts regarding Responsible Research and Innovation (RRI), Citizenship Educa-tion (CE), SSI and IBSE for the education in modern society, the teaching strategy of SocioScientific Inquiry-Based Learning (SSIBL) is generated and recognized by the European Commission to promote in teacher education and apply in school educa-tion. The presentation is based on an EU FP7 project, PARRISE (No. 612438), aiming to develop TPD courses to enhance pre- and in-service teachers’ competence on teaching students’ SSIBL in formal and informal education from primary to upper secondary education levels. The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate a design of a SSIBL TPD course (with a focus of RRI, SSI, IBSE and CE concepts) for a group of pre-service teachers at primary education level. Further, the pre-service teachers’ awareness on teaching strategies involving SSI, IBSE to enhance SSIBL is investigated with the main research questions including: 1. What are the pre-service teachers’ awareness of SSI and IBSE teaching? 2. What are the re-service teachers’ awareness of SSI, IBSE and SSIBL teaching after the SSIBL TPD course? 3. What are pre-service teachers’ general feedback on the SSIBL TPD course? Through the pre- and post-test with quantitative Likert-Scale questionnaire survey, the results showed that the 26 pre-service teachers’ confidence on SSI, IBSE and SSIBL teaching strategies were increased and need for further education was decre-ased, both with significantly differences (p < 0.05) after the SSIBL TPD course. Also, the general feedback on the SSIBL course was positive as well.

  • 10.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Primary school pre-service teachers’ confidence and need concerning socioscientific inquiry based learning2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    SSI pedagogic discourse: embracing scientific media literacy and ESD to face the multimedia world.2014In: Science education research and Education for sustainable development: a collection of invited papers inspired by the 22nd Symposium on Chemistry and Science Education held at the University of Bremen, 19-21 June 2014. / [ed] Ingo Eilks, Silvija Markic & Bernd Ralle, Aachen: Shaker Verlag, 2014, p. 157-168Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this science and technology dominated society, the complex interrelationship of science, technology, environment and society has been noticed during the past 30 years. In line with this phenomenon, socioscientific issues (SSI) are not only emerging in the research field of science/environmental education, but also discussed in our everyday multimedia world. This year is the last year of the UN Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) decade (year 2005 to 2014), it is time to reflect upon what we have done and how we ought to continue in the next step. Therefore, in this presentation, firstly, we will address the important relationship of scientific literacy (SL), ESD, SSI and science media literacy (SML) in the modern society. Secondly, based on the aforementioned important relationship of SML, ESD and SSI, a model of SSI pedagogic discourse is presented to contribute to school education. The implications to ESD, media, science and citizen education are delineated.

  • 12.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    What are we aiming for?—A Delphi study on the development of civic scientific literacy in Sweden2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 224-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the EU FP 7 project PROFILES, this article presents our findings from a three-round Delphi study conducted in Sweden which aimed at establishing a consensus on how science education should be developed for citizens to enhance civic scientific literacy. A total of 100 stakeholders (9th graders, school teachers, scientists and science education researchers) were involved in our Delphi study in 2012–13. The results revealed that there were some highly ranked consensus ideas: environmental issues, inquiry skills, motivation/interest and holistic comprehension were all in line with conclusions drawn elsewhere in the literature and ideas within the PROFILES project itself. However, we also found that there were some mismatched aspects of our Delphi study and the Swedish curriculum. The conclusions of our research imply the importance of involving different stakeholders in the educational reconstruction process; we suggest that the school teacher in particular should play a vital role.

  • 13.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Yao, Bao-Jun
    Visualization in research and science teachers’ professional development2014In: Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1609-4913, E-ISSN 1609-4913, Vol. 15, no 2, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the importance and widely use of visualization in science, this article has a three-fold aim related to the terms of visualization, representation and model that in recent years have been introduced to the field of science education without clear differentiation. Firstly, the three terms are discussed with examples to provide a common ground for the following discussion. Secondly, the roles of visualization in science education are delineated to inform teachers how visualization can be used to enhance their teaching and students’ learning in science. Thirdly, based on visualization research in science education, there are a number of aspects that we need to consider while embedding the proposed visualization into the development of teachers’ professional knowledge. We hope to contribute to pre- and in-service science teachers’ professional development linked to the use of visualization in science education.

  • 14. Christensson, Nina
    et al.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Science and Language Teachers’ Assessment of Upper Secondary Students’ Socio-scientific Argumentation2017In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, Vol. 15, no 8, p. 1403-1422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Researchers and policy-makers have recognized the importance of including and promoting socioscientific argumentation in science education worldwide. The Swedish curriculum focuses more than ever on socioscientific issues (SSI) as well. However, teaching socioscientific argumentation is not an easy task for science teachers and one of the more distinguished difficulties is the assessment of students’ performance. In this study, we investigate and compare how science and Swedish language teachers, participating in an SSI-driven project, assessed students’ written argumentation about global warming. Swedish language teachers have a long history of teaching and assessing argumentation and therefore it was of interest to identify possible gaps between the two groups of teachers’ assessment practices. The results showed that the science teachers focused on students’ content knowledge within their subjects, whereas the Swedish language teachers included students’ abilities to select and use content knowledge from reliable reference resources, the structure of the argumentation and the form of language used. Since the Swedish language teachers’ assessment correlated more with previous research about quality in socioscientific argumentation, we suggest that a closer co-operation between the two groups could be beneficial in terms of enhancing the quality of assessment. Moreover, SSI teaching and learning as well as assessment of socioscientific argumentation ought to be included in teacher training programs for both pre- and in-service science teachers.

  • 15. Christensson, Nina
    et al.
    Gericke, Niklas
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Science and Swedish language teachers’ assessment of upper secondary students’ socioscientific argumentation2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16. Lunde, Torodd
    et al.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Drechsler, Michael
    Exploring the negotiation of the meaning of laboratory work in a continuous professional development program for lower secondary teachers2016In: The Electronic Journal of Science Education, ISSN 1087-3430, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 26-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to explore lower secondary teachers’ negotiation of the meaning of laboratory work in a continuous professional development program. A total of 15 in-service teachers were invited to participate in a professional development program in which explicit tensions between key ideas concerning laboratory work from the Swedish teaching tradition and inquiry-based science teaching as discussed in the international literature were highlighted and used to frame discussions and negotiations about the purpose of laboratory activities in schools. Audio recordings of two group reflections and a transcript of one focused group interview were used as sources of data for analysis. The teachers were divided into different groups, and there were significant differences between the ways in which certain groups addressed the negotiation process. The outcome of the negotiations depended on how the participating teachers challenged themselves and each other. Two groups reflected effectively on their awareness of the different objectives of laboratory work in science teaching and learning. However, the third group’s reflections were more limited, even though all three groups ultimately developed similar teaching activities at the end of the program. The implications of these results for inquiry-based science teaching and teachers’ professional development programs are discussed.

  • 17. Lunde, Torodd
    et al.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Karlstads universitet, Sverige.
    När läroplan och tradition möts – hur högstadielärare bemöter yttre förväntningar på undersökande arbete i naturämnesundervisningen2015In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 88-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How lower secondary science teachers meet external expectations on inquiry-based science teaching

    The current Swedish curricula for compulsory school (Lgr11) emphasize inquiry-based science teaching to develop pupils’ critical thinking while the Swedish laboratory teaching tradition emphasize labora-tory work to promote students’ conceptual understanding. The aim of this study is to illuminate how a group of teachers within the Swedish teaching tradition, based on the prevailing condition, met the external expectations of involving pupils in inquiry-based science teaching. During a teacher profes-sional development program, the entire group of lower secondary science teachers within a school district, twelve in total, participated in group reflections about own inquiry activities. The results indicated that teachers, despite shortage of activities, wanted to involve pupils in inquiry-based science teaching to meet the curricula’s and national tests’ request for such activities. The teachers did this through hybridization, in which the teachers opened up and transformed existing laboratory activities; and by imitation, in which they imitated how investigative inquiry is carried out on natio-nal tests. Inquiry-based science teaching, as it emerges in this study, possessed several characteristics might limiting the potential for pupils to develop an understanding functional for critical thinking in private- and public lives.

  • 18.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Aiming for responsible and competent citizenship through teacher professional development on teaching socioscientific inquiry-based learning (SSIBL)2018In: Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1609-4913, Vol. 19, no 2, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to achieve the goal of scientific literacy for responsible citizenship, the importance of developing students' socioscientific inquiry-based learning (SSIBL) has been recognised by an EU FP7 project, PARRISE, including the essential notions of responsible research and innovation (RRI), and citizenship education (CE). The study aims to investigate pre-service primary science teachers' confidence in and need for further education on teaching SSIBL as well as their reflections -in and -on a three-step model SSIBL activity. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were applied in the study. Quantitative methods were applied to collect data from the 76 participating pre-service primary science teachers in Sweden; participants' confidence and need for SSIBL teaching was investigated via a Likert scale questionnaire. The qualitative descriptive analysis method was used to explore participants' reflection-on-action regarding the three-step SSIBL activity and the SSIBL framework. Thematic analyses were applied to analyse the participants' reflection-in-action concerning the design of the three-step SSIBL activity with three aspects of PCK. The results showed that the pre-service teachers had confidence in SSIBL, but still needed further education on SSIBL teaching. The outcomes of the study suggest that developing teachers' SSIBL teaching competence is important and needed from both of the researchers' points of view and the participating teachers' feedback.

  • 19.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Primary teachers’ reflections-in- and on- actions concerning socioscientific inquiry based learning activities2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The Development of PROFILES teachers in Sweden2014In: The 19th International Conference, EcoBalt 2014: Book of Abstracts, Riga: University of Latvia , 2014, p. 52-52Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This presentation aims to share our experiences on the development of PROFILES with in-service science teachers for grade 7-9 in Sweden during the period of time from year 2012 to 2014. Inquiry-based science education (IBSE) has been addressed in science education internationally during the past decades, and the new Swedish curriculum from 2011 also emphasize the need to develop students’ inquiry skills. However, to what extent school teachers in Sweden have developed their professional knowledge on IBSE has only been focused in a small number of studies in Sweden and it was found that in-service teachers were not well-informed about the ideas of IBSE [1]. Therefore, in the PROFILES project in Sweden, we could create time and space for in-service teachers to develop and reflect on IBSE. During the two PROFILES teacher groups, as science education researchers and educators, we also develop our knowledge and skills on how to develop a successful teachers’ professional development [2].

  • 21.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Eriksson, Martin
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Investigating the intertwinement of knowledge, value, and experience of upper secondary students’ argumentation concerning socioscientific issues2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to explore students’ argumentation and decision-making relating toan authentic socioscientific issue (SSI)—the problem of environmental toxins in fish from theBaltic Sea. A multi-disciplinary instructional module, designed in order to develop students’skills to argue about complex SSI, was successfully tested. Seven science majors in the finalyear of their upper secondary studies participated in this study. Their argumentation anddecision-making processes were followed closely, and data were collected during multiplestages of the instructional module: group discussions were audio recorded, the participantswrote reports on their decision making, and postexercise interviews were conducted withindividual students. The analysis focused on the skill of evaluation demonstrated by thestudents during the exercise and the relationships between the knowledge, values, andexperiences that they used in their argumentation. Even though all of the students had accessto the same information and agreed on the factual aspects of the issue, they came to differentdecisions. All of the students took counter-arguments and the limitations of their claims intoaccount and were able to extend their claims where appropriate. However, their decisionsdiffered depending on their background knowledge, values, and experiences (i.e., theirintellectual baggage). The implication to SSI teaching and learning is discussed.

  • 22.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Eriksson, Martin
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Investigating the intertwinement of knowledge, value and experience of upper secondary students' argumentation concerning socioscientific issues2017In: Science & Education, ISSN 0926-7220, E-ISSN 1573-1901, Vol. 25, no 9-10, p. 1049-1071Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to explore students’ argumentation and decision-making relating to an authentic socioscientific issue (SSI)—the problem of environmental toxins in fish from the Baltic Sea. A multi-disciplinary instructional module, designed in order to develop students’ skills to argue about complex SSI, was successfully tested. Seven science majors in the final year of their upper secondary studies participated in this study. Their argumentation and decision-making processes were followed closely, and data were collected during multiple stages of the instructional module: group discussions were audio recorded, the participants wrote reports on their decision making, and postexercise interviews were conducted with individual students. The analysis focused on the skill of evaluation demonstrated by the students during the exercise and the relationships between the knowledge, values, and experiences that they used in their argumentation. Even though all of the students had access to the same information and agreed on the factual aspects of the issue, they came to different decisions. All of the students took counter-arguments and the limitations of their claims into account and were able to extend their claims where appropriate. However, their decisions differed depending on their background knowledge, values, and experiences (i.e., their intellectual baggage). The implication to SSI teaching and learning is discussed.

  • 23.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Eriksson, Martin
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    The interrelationship of value and knowledge in students’ socio-scientific inquiry-based learning2016In: ERIDO 2016: Eleventh Conference of European Researchers in Didactics of Biology, 2016, p. 128-128Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socioscientific issues (SSI) are emerging issues globally nowadays, and at the same time,become an important research field in science education internationally. Accordingly,teaching and learning of SSI and the related skills of inquiry and argumentation arerecognized in school science today. This study is based on the EU FP7 project PARRISE (No.612438) aiming to promote socioscientific inquiry-based learning (SSIBL). In addition to thedesign of the six-step SSIBL teaching module shown in this presentation, the study aims toinvestigate how students’ knowledge and values interact in students’ SSI-decision-making. Atotal of seven students (4 males and 3 females) from a science-major program at an uppersecondary school in Sweden were invited to participate in the SSIBL teaching module onenvironmental toxins in fish from the Baltic Sea. The findings showed that, even though thestudents were aware of the risks of eating fatty fish from Baltic Sea, still, two distinct groupsof SSI-decisions could be identified. For those who agreed that Sweden should have apermanent exemption from the EU regulation for dioxins in fatty fish from the Baltic Sea, themain arguments were connected to values and the reasons related to the consumers’ right offree choice and responsibility to keep informed about the risks. The further implication toresearch and education on enhancing SSIBL will be discussed at the presentation.

  • 24.
    Rundgren, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Persson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Comparing Different Stakeholders’ View on Science Education with the Science Curriculum in Sweden: Reflecting on the PROFILES 3-step Module2014In: Science Teachers‘ Continuous Professional Development in Europe: Case Studies from the PROFILES Project / [ed] Bolte, C., Holbrook, J., Mamlok-Naaman, R., Rauch, F., Klagenfurt: Alpen-Adria-Universität , 2014, p. 38-47Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To obtain a consensus of different stakeholders’ view and contribute to the development of scienceeducation, a Delphi study was conducted in Sweden during 2012–2013. The purpose of this chapterwas to compare different stakeholders’ view on science education in the first two rounds of the SwedishDelphi study with the current Swedish curriculum (Lgr 11) for the science subjects in grade 7–9 and to see whataspects might need to be developed further in the science curriculum. A total of 212 stakeholders from groupsof scientists, science teachers, science educators and students were invited to provide their ideas concerningscience education in the first round of the Swedish Delphi study. A total of 100 responses from the first roundand 76 from a second round were analyzed and presented in this article. From the results, 75 categorieswere identified in the first round of the Swedish Delphi study while, in the second round, the categories werenarrowed down to 57 according to a mean score above 4. We found that science-technology-society (STS)was an emerging view from the stakeholders’ responses, not only highlighted in our Delphi study, but alsoaddressed in the Swedish curriculum for science subjects in grade 7–9 (Lgr 11). Some aspects revealed in ourDelphi study, were not addressed in the curriculum. Based on our results, we have argued that the PROFILES3–stage model was a suitable way of teaching sciences for grade 7–9, since the aspects analyzed from theresults of the Swedish Delphi study and the Swedish curriculum could be embedded.

  • 25.
    Spiteri, Marthese
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Maltese primary teachers' digital competence: implications for continuing professional development2017In: European Journal of Teacher Education, ISSN 0261-9768, E-ISSN 1469-5928, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 521-534Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Learning with technology during primary school years will equip students with dispositions to continue learning with evolving technology throughout their lifetime and it is the responsibility of the teacher to develop this digital competence (DC) in the classroom. The aim of this research was to investigate Maltese primary class teachers' DC and to recommend new training on technology integration in teaching practices. Semi-structured individual interviews with 26 primary teachers (23 females and three males) and the teaching material used in the classroom were the sources of data in this study. Directed content analysis was applied, where a new area in DC, the creation of modes of communication, was revealed. Recommendations for teacher training in the areas of DC are suggested.

  • 26.
    Walan, Susanne
    et al.
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Chang Rundgren, Shu-Nu
    Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Student responses to context- and inquiry-based three-step teaching model.2015In: Teaching Science: The Journal of the Australian Science Teachers Association, ISSN 1449-6313, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 33-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has indicated that both context- and inquiry-based approaches could increase student interest in learning sciences. This case study aims to present a context- and inquiry-based combined teaching approach, using a three-step teaching model developed by the PROFILES project, and investigates Swedish students' responses to the activity. A Likert scale questionnaire was used for the data collection. The results of a total of 105 15-year-old students showed that, overall, the students were highly positive about this science teaching module.

1 - 26 of 26
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