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  • 1.
    Vonderau, Asta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Zur Poetik der Infrastruktur: Technologien des Kühlens und der Imagination im digitalen Kapitalismus2017In: Zeitschrift für Volkskunde, ISSN 0044-3700, Vol. 113, no 1, 24-41 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    This article examines the downside of digitization processes industrial and infrastructural locations that facilitate virtual connectivity and collectivities. Based on the case of Facebook's data center in the Northern Swedish town of Lulea, the article describes processes of cloud infrastructuring. In the course of such infrastructuring processes, various technologies, communities of actors, stocks of knowledge and expertise, moral values, and organizational structures come together, new socio-technical figuration emerge, and social change is enabled. Particular attention is given to imaginings as a practice of knowledge production inherent to processes of infrastructuring. The article links what appears as merely virtual data flows to material and political channels, revealing their multiple local entanglements.

  • 2.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Brokers, channels, infrastructure: moving migrant labor in the Indonesian-Malaysian oil palm complex2017In: Mobilities, ISSN 1745-0101, E-ISSN 1745-011X, Vol. 12, no 2, 213-226 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article problematizes the dichotomy between fluid mobility and fixed infrastructure through a case study of migrant labor recruitment from Indonesia to the Malaysian oil palm industry. Channels of low-skilled transnational migration must be understood in relation to other forms of mobility, most notably that of brokers, who move along adjacent and overlapping routes. Broker mobility is not only shaped by relatively immobile moorings, but also by more fluid moorings', notably mobile communication, low-cost airlines, and emergent social relationships. In order to understand how the migration process is arranged it is critical to pay attention to the logistical practices that make mobility possible. The article argues that broker mobility, diverse forms of moorings, and logistics come to shape a socio-technical system that can be understood in terms migration infrastructure.

  • 3. Lin, Weiqiang
    et al.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Xiang, Biao
    Yeoh, Brenda S. A.
    Migration infrastructures and the production of migrant mobilities2017In: Mobilities, ISSN 1745-0101, E-ISSN 1745-011X, Vol. 12, no 2, 167-174 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the proclamation of a mobility turn in the 2000s, scholars have populated the field with invaluable insights on what it means to move, and what the politics of movement are. One particularly useful thread revolves around the issue of infrastructures, which have generally been taken to mean the manifest forms of moorings and fixities that help order and give shape to mobilities. Yet, while significant inroads have been made in delineating the morphologies of transport infrastructures, mobilities research has been relatively reticent about the organisational structures, orders and arrangements that give rise to another key mobile phenomenon of our time international migration. In this editorial introduction, we lay down some groundwork on the productive and political nature of infrastructures that likewise affect and inform the way (im)mobilities are contingently created and parsed in migration. Looking through the prism of East and Southeast Asia and its migration infrastructures, we take advantage of the new' infrastructural configurations in an emerging empirical context to point to some directions by which mobilities researchers can more rigorously interrogate migration' as another socially meaningful and specific form of mobility that exceeds a mere displacement of people or change in national domicile.

  • 4. Vandenhelsken, Mélanie
    et al.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Fluid attachments in Northeast India: introduction2016In: Asian Ethnicity, ISSN 1463-1369, E-ISSN 1469-2953, Vol. 17, no 3, 330-339 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction presents the context and theoretical basis of fluidity of attachments in Northeast India. A large cultural, linguistic, and ethnic diversity, an international border situation, and various forms of unsettled relations with ‘mainstream India’ characterize Northeast India. These aspects form the frame of highly dynamic movements of identity and ethnicity formation. This special issue includes five papers that focus on these dynamics in terms of ‘fluidity’; they present new situations of shift between different layers of identification, re-signification of cultural practices in the process of their selection as emblems of groups‘ identity, changes in groups’ specific practices after religious conversion, and shifts from one identity to another. They show that shifts of ethnic identity are old processes in the region, whereas other levels of identification, such as lineages, clans, villages, and new ‘cosmopolitan’ identities coexist alongside ethnic identity, and gain particular salience in certain situations or points of time.

  • 5.
    Graham, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Anthropologists Are Talking about Queer Anthropology2016In: Ethnos, ISSN 0014-1844, E-ISSN 1469-588X, Vol. 81, no 2, 364-377 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Hagberg, Sten
    et al.
    Körling, Gabriella
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Urban land contestations and political mobilisation: (re)sources of authority and protest in West African municipalities2016In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 24, no 3, 294-308 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper is based on anthropological research on socio-political opposition in West African municipalities. We analyse how land schemes for urban development are at the centre of social contest and political mobilisation in municipalities, by developing examples from peri-urban areas of Bamako, Mali and Niamey, Niger. We point to several contradictions that lie at the heart of zoning, one of the most dominant forms of urban land management and urban development in many cities in West Africa. They concern, first, who actually benefits from zoning projects and the promises of development and modernisation; second, the dual role of zoning projects as sources of both public resources and private enrichment; third, the gradual replacement of village populations and the rekindling of a politics of belonging; and, finally, the emergence of new political moralities in the face of corruption and mismanagement. We conclude that urban land contests are simultaneously sources and resources of authority and protest. While the skilful and creative combination of these sources and resources is an asset in municipal politics, political mobilisation is also fuelled by protest movements of those marginalised in urban land management schemes, carving out new spaces for socio-political opposition in West African municipalities.

  • 7.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Neergaard, Anders
    Social capital and the educational achievement of young people in Sweden2016In: British Journal of Sociology of Education, ISSN 0142-5692, E-ISSN 1465-3346, Vol. 37, no 7, 947-969 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on Bourdieu's conceptualization of social capital (the social stratification perspective), this study examines the impact of social capital on the educational outcomes of young people in Sweden, with a focus on the extra-familial aspect of social capital - that is, social capital generated by parental networks and active membership in various social organizations and friendship networks. The results indicate that the class background of respondents is the main predictor of access to all three forms of extra-familial social capital. However, after controlling for class background, the children of racialized immigrant groups are more likely to have access to more types of social capital than others. All three aspects of extra-familial social capital positively influence the educational performance of pupils.

  • 8.
    González-Fernández, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Entre nodos y nudos: ambivalencias emocionales en la migración transnacional: Una aproximación etnográfica a las emociones a partir de familias transnacionales entre Bolivia y España2016In: Odisea. Revista de Estudios Migratorios, ISSN 2408-445X, no 3, 99-123 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork carried out in Bolivia and Spain, this article explores the reconfiguration of family relations maintained by middle-aged migrant women in a context of transnational migration. Indeed, transnational migration triggers contradictory feelings for those leaving and for those who stay behind. The individuals interviewed repeatedly express mixed feelings of guilt, pride, sadness and satisfaction, often interwoven with meaningful silences, demands, and expectations. In this particular instance, the aim is to visibilize the emotional dimension inherent in family relations at a distance to demonstrate how migration is also affected by the weight of care responsibilities, the family life course, gender roles, or intergenerational relations.

  • 9.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Beyond social ties: The impact of social capital on labour market outcomes for young Swedish people2016In: Journal of Sociology, ISSN 1440-7833, E-ISSN 1741-2978, Vol. 52, no 4, 711-724 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study makes use of a dataset which contains material relating to young Swedish people who have recently completed their studies and started working. It explores whether using social networks as such or using individuals' resources which are accessible through social networks (social capital) provides relative advantages in the competition for better jobs. Interest in this topic stems from the recent development of sociological theories in this field. The results indicate that the use of social ties is a common way to find a job in the highly regulated Swedish labour market, but that informal recruitment methods per se provide no relative advantages in the competition for better jobs. On the other hand, given the same demographic characteristics, socioeconomic background and educational attainments, there is a positive association between resources embedded in an individual's social network (social capital) and the quality of the jobs obtained.

  • 10.
    Gustavsson, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Nyberg, Catarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Westin, Charles
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Plurality and continuity-Understanding self-identity of persons with intellectual disability2016In: Alter;European Journal of Disability Research ;Journal Europeen de Recherche Sur le Handicap, ISSN 1875-0672, E-ISSN 1875-0680, Vol. 10, no 4, 310-326 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this article is to explore the complexity and continuity of self-identities of persons with intellectual disability. This is done by close reading of four life stories. The findings are that intellectually disabled people's self-identities are basically plural and fluid. A fruitful approach to understanding this plurality is given by positioning theory developed by Harre & Langenhove. We analyze the subject's sense of continuity in terms of our own concept of inner dialogue. Our point of departure is a review of literature with special focus on multiple identities. We distinguish between three strands of knowledge within this field: (1) sociological studies of other-defined, identities, which are hard to change; (2) psychological studies of dynamic, self-defined identities characterized by adaptation and continuity, and (3) discursive studies of fluid and plural self- and other-defined identities. The third strand has contributed significantly to the field of disability studies by transcending the classic dichotomy of normalcy or deviancy (of identity) of persons with intellectual disabilities. In our aim to probe deeper into the issues of plurality and continuity of self-defined identities, we turn to Stuart Hall's noteworthy text: Who needs identity?' (Hall & Du Gay, 1996). Hall proposes that a new direction for a theory of identity needs to build on input from discursive studies, but it should also embrace the question of how the subject maintains a sense of personal continuity.

  • 11.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sörbom, Adrienne
    Magical formulae for market futures: Tales from the World Economic Forum meeting in Davos2016In: Anthropology Today, ISSN 0268-540X, E-ISSN 1467-8322, Vol. 32, no 6, 18-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Markets are often portrayed as being organized by way of rationalized knowledge, objective reasoning, and the fluctuations of demand and supply. In parallel, and often mixed with this modality of knowledge, magical beliefs and practices are prevalent. Business leaders, management consultants, and financial advisors are often savvy in the art of creatively blending the ‘objective facts’ of markets with magical formulae, rites, and imaginaries of the future. This article looks at the World Economic Forum's yearly Davos meeting as a large-scale ritual that engages senior executives of global corporations, top-level politicians, and civil society leaders to contribute to the overall aim of ‘improving the world’. The Davos gathering has become a vital part of the business calendar, just as much for the intensity of its networking as for the declarations of action from the speakers’ podiums. The presentations and performances in Davos work as ‘technologies of enchantment’ in Gell's (1992) sense, instilling a sense of agency onto participants. The ritual also contributes towards securing the acquiescence of individuals and organizations in a transnational network of politico-economic intentionalities. By invoking global and regional challenges and risks, discussing possible scenarios and solutions, presenters invoke a sense of urgency and contribute to the articulation of global ‘problems’ and ‘solutions’. It is proposed that the magic of Davos resides to a large extent in the ritualized form of interaction and the technologies of enchantment through which it is set up.

  • 12.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Forest of Our Lives: In and Out of Political Ecology2016In: Conservation and Society, ISSN 0972-4923, E-ISSN 0975-3133, Vol. 14, no 4, 380-390 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I seek to bring together a number of environmental histories to think about the place of forest in our lives. It is partly autobiographical in the sense that it concerns forest issues that 1, for various reasons, have been entangled with recently. These are the making of carbon (REDD+) forests in Northeast India, preservation of the urban forests and planting of indigenous trees in Karura forests in Nairobi, Kenya, and the transformation of Swedish forests into vast industrial plantations. I come to these issues with little knowledge about the forest ecology or the flora and fauna, as such, but rather as a scholar with earlier experience of analysis of the social and political dynamics involved in conflicts over forests, that is, how differently powered actors seek to appropriate, stake claims to or control the forest. Hence, my point of departure and analytical framework is largely that of political ecology. In a conversation about the work of the anthropologist Brian Morris, I will point to the thinness of such an approach and open up aspects that are critical to Morris' way of engaging with the interactions of people, plants, insects, and animals. This, I will argue, is a truly grounded environmental anthropology.

  • 13.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Jazz i Ghana: musik som kosmopolitism2015In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 24, no 2, 34-38 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    In Favour of Flexible Forms: Multi-Sited Fieldwork2015In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 23, no 3, 355-357 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ireland in the World, the World in Ireland2015In: American Anthropologist, ISSN 0002-7294, E-ISSN 1548-1433, Vol. 117, no 1, 142-143 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    På väg i Bhutan.2015In: Druk Yul: medlemstidning för The Swedish Bhutan Society, ISSN 1401-9469, no 2, 9-13 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Uimonen, Paula
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Mourning Mandela: sacred drama and digital visuality in Cape Town2015In: Journal of Aesthetics and Culture, ISSN 2000-4214, E-ISSN 2000-4214, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The world united in unprecedented ways in mourning the global icon Nelson Mandela, an emotionally charged historical event in which digital visuality played an influential role. The memorial service for Nelson Mandela on Tuesday, 10 December 2013, gathered dignitaries and celebrities from around the world at the First National Bank Stadium in Johannesburg, to mourn the passing of Madiba and to celebrate his life work. At the Grand Parade in Cape Town, the event was broadcast on large public screens, followed by live music performances and narrowcast interaction with the audience. Building on recent research on public screens during global media events, this article addresses the mediated mourning rituals at the Grand Parade in terms of a sacred drama. Focusing on social relationality, the article discusses how digital visuality mediated a sense of global communitas, thus momentarily overcoming historical frictions between the global north and the global south, while expanding the fame of Madiba. Paying attention to the public display of visual memory objects and the emotional agency of images, it argues that digital visuality mediated social frictions between the living and the dead, while recasting a historical subject as a historical object. The article further discusses how digital visuality mediated cultural frictions of apartheid and xenophobia, through the positioning of Mandela in the pantheon of Pan-African icons, thus underlining the African origin of this global icon. The analysis is based on ethnographic observations and experiences in Cape Town.

  • 18.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Writing Futures An Anthropologist's View of Global Scenarios2015In: Current Anthropology, ISSN 0011-3204, E-ISSN 1537-5382, Vol. 56, no 6, 797-818 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Toward the end of the twentieth century, the Cold War ended, and globalization became a key word in public discourse. In the new situation people could ask, with relief or anxiety, what might happen next. So a small but lively intellectual industry rose to the challenge, creating scenarios for a born-again world. As the world turned, there would be more of them. With 9/11 there was another wave of global commentary. There were hot wars in Central Asia and the Middle East, and then, with economic upheavals spreading rather unevenly over the world, there were shifts in the global centers of gravity. This again generated more scenarios for the world. Often, the future visions could be encapsulated in striking catchphrases: the end of history, the clash of civilizations, jihad versus McWorld, soft power, and others. The Eric Wolf Lecture of 2014 scrutinizes world scenarios as a genre of creative writing but also considers their role as a set of representations of the world that are now circulated, received, and debated in a worldwide web of social relationships. As a contemporary sociocultural phenomenon, the scenarios come out of a zone of knowledge production where academia, media, and politics meet. The authors are global public intellectuals. While anthropology has contributed little to them directly, these writings deserve attention for the way they offer the Big Picture of the world and, at times, for their use of cultural understandings.

  • 19.
    Nyqvist, Anette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Corporation Performed: Minutes from the Rituals of Annual General Meetings2015In: Journal of Organizational Ethnography, ISSN 2046-6749, E-ISSN 2046-6757, Vol. 4, no 3, 341-355 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]
    • Purpose–In this paper the annual general meetings (AGM) of corporations are conceptualized as front-stage performances and dramas where the three roles of the corporation – the shareholder, manager and director – perform the corporation as a particular type of organization. The paper aims to discuss these issues.
    • Design/methodology/approach– Meeting ethnography conducted at four seasons of AGMs in Sweden.
    • Findings– The study sheds light on how the required AGM of public companies may be seen as a ritualized, legitimizing and trust-building corporate performance where the different roles of the corporation are played out in positioning procedures and where the corporation as an organizational form is enacted.
    • Originality/value– The topic is of this paper is clearly original. Looking at corporations from an anthropological angle, exploring foundation myths, rites and organizational cultures, have been employed earlier, but exploring AGMs from an anthropological angle, is new.
  • 20.
    Uimonen, Paula
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Number not reachable: Mobile infrastructure and global racial hierarchy in Africa2015In: Journal des anthropologues, ISSN 2114-2203, no 142-143, 29-47 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Focusing on infrastructural malfunctioning, this article discusses the visual materiality and political economy of mobile infrastructure in Africa. Building on the anthropology of infrastructure, it argues that contrary to the oft cited notion that infrastructure is invisible until it breaks down, in an African context, systemic breakdowns in infrastructure are taken for granted; they are visibly present, while well functioning infrastructure is visibly absent. The material visibility and malfunctioning of mobile infrastructure are used as departure points for a critical appraisal of what is often celebrated as Africa’s mobile success story. Noting how mobile phones are present in most aspects of daily life, functioning like material extensions of the self, the analysis focuses on neoliberal forms of predatory capitalism that recast citizens as self-regulated consumers while advancing corporate forms of governance. Following the call for theory from the south, malfunctioning mobile infrastructure is contextualized as a state of partial inclusion in the global network society, the structural underpinnings of which is interpreted in terms of Africa’s place-in-the-world in a racialized global hierarchy.   

  • 21.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Of figures and types: brokering knowledge and migration in Indonesia and beyond2015In: Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, ISSN 1359-0987, E-ISSN 1467-9655, Vol. 21, no SI, 162-177 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper takes the broker as an entry-point for considering the problem of exemplification in anthropology. In particular, it approaches this problem by way of the relationship between figure and type, or between example and theoretical exemplar. While the figure is contingent on a specific socio-historical context, the type consciously accentuates particular characteristics in order to form the basis for comparison. More specifically, the paper approaches this relationship by considering the broker as type in relation to two specific figures in the current regime of transnational Indonesian migration, namely the NGO outreach worker and the informal labour recruiter, both identified as field agents', or petugas lapangan, in Indonesia. By way of juxtaposition the paper discusses the oscillation between figure and type in order to consider biases in the anthropological literature on brokers - most notably that the the broker is inherently amoral if not immoral - while suggesting that the broker is an exemplary methodological starting-point for contemporary anthropology.

  • 22.
    Norman, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Rabo, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Sönderdela eller sammanfoga: en antropologisk syn på diagnoser2015In: Socialmedicinsk Tidskrift, ISSN 0037-833X, Vol. 92, no 1, 38-46 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Kikon, Dolly
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Fermenting Modernity: Putting Akhuni on the Nation's Table in India2015In: South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies, ISSN 0085-6401, E-ISSN 1479-0270, Vol. 38, no 2, 320-335 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I explore notions of modernity, citizenship, belonging and transgressions in South Asia through the fermented food, akhuni. Fermented soya beans, popularly known as akhuni in Nagaland, a state in Northeast India with a majority tribal population, has a distinct pungent aroma and taste. This food is relished across the eastern Himalayan societies, including Nagaland, but routinely causes conflict between akhuni consumers and those who find the smell revolting. In 2007, due to increasing akhuni conflict in New Delhi, the Delhi police produced a handbook t hat cautions students and workers from Northeast India and eastern Himalayan societies that they should refrain from cooking akhuni and other fermented foods. Such official directives reiterate how the state plays a significant role in legitimising or prohibiting certain foods that particular social groups in contemporary India consume, relegating these communities to a remote position in the national social and culinary order. Against the backdrop of such friction, this article examines why akhuni consumers of the eastern Himalayan societies assert that eating fermented food is an integral part of their culture and history. Conversations about eating cultures, I argue, have to be understood as expressions of resistance, negotiation and the anxieties of striving to be a modern tribal in contemporary India.

  • 24.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Rothstein, Bo
    Svallfors, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Sociologiska institutionen, Umeå universitet.
    Politikproffs i kulisserna styr utan demokratiskt mandat2015In: Dagens nyheterArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Macek, Ivana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    L’imprevisto e la confusione: metodo e teoria nella Sarajevo sotto assedio2015In: Antropologia, ISSN 2420-8469, Vol. 2, no 1, 185-201 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26. Krause-Jensen, Jakob
    et al.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Introduction: neoliberal turns in higher education2014In: Learning and Teaching, ISSN 1755-2273, Vol. 7, no 3, 1-13 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27. Gil Araujo, Sandra
    et al.
    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    International migration, public policies and domestic work Latin American migrant women in the Spanish domestic work sector2014In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, Vol. 46, 13-23 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the Spanish case, in this article we explore the connection between migration policies, family policies, gender regimes and the insertion of Latin American migrant women into the domestic work sector. Over the first decade of the twenty-first century, Latin America became the main region of origin of migrants who had settled in Spain, being women the first link in these migration chains. The main factors that have affected the configuration of this feminization are linked to migration policies and patterns of migration, the features of the welfare state, the characteristics of the labor market and the way in which gender organizes and stratifies migration and domestic work. The achievement of national middle class women's rights to conciliate their professional and family life through outsourcing domestic work to non-national women also brings with it a deep inequality in terms of citizenship.

  • 28. Xiang, Biao
    et al.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Migration Infrastructure2014In: The international migration review, ISSN 0197-9183, E-ISSN 1747-7379, Vol. 48, s122-S148 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the authors' long-term field research on low-skilled labor migration from China and Indonesia, this article establishes that more than ever labor migration is intensively mediated. Migration infrastructure - the systematically interlinked technologies, institutions, and actors that facilitate and condition mobility - serves as a concept to unpack the process of mediation. Migration can be more clearly conceptualized through a focus on infrastructure rather than on state policies, the labor market, or migrant social networks alone. The article also points to a trend of infrastructural involution, in which the interplay between different dimensions of migration infrastructure make it self-perpetuating and self-serving, and impedes rather than enhances people's migratory capability. This explains why labor migration has become both more accessible and more cumbersome in many parts of Asia since the late 1990s. The notion of migration infrastructure calls for research that is less fixated on migration as behavior or migrants as the primary subject, and more concerned with broader societal transformations.

  • 29.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Confessions of a Hoosier Anthropologist2014In: American Anthropologist, ISSN 0002-7294, E-ISSN 1548-1433, Vol. 116, no 1, 169-172 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Rabo, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Comments on Rikke Andreassen's Muslim women and interracial intimacies: Debate2014In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 4, no 1, 40-44 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Andersson, Ruben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. London School Economics & Political Science Univeristy London.
    Hunter and prey: Patrolling Clandestine Migration in the Euro-African Borderlands2014In: Anthropological Quarterly, ISSN 0003-5491, E-ISSN 1534-1518, Vol. 87, no 1, 119-149 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past decade, the European Union and its member states have invested heavily in a far-reaching, diffuse, and technologized border regime targeting the elusive figure of the clandestine or illegal African migrant. Taking the mismatch between these large investments and the statistically small number of overland irregular migrants as its starting point, this article explores the embodied effects of illegality engendered in the policing of the Euro-African borderlands. Based on fieldwork with West African police forces, aid organizations, and migrants, it focuses on the migration circuit between the Sahel and Spain, where a joint European response to irregular flows was first tried and tested under the umbrella of the EU border agency Frontex. By highlighting the means of detection used to apprehend illegal migrants - from bodily signs to presumed intentions to migrate - the article looks at how an increasingly reified and embodied modality of migrant illegality is produced on the circuit between West Africa and Europe's southern shores. This production of illegality crucially depends on the incentives offered to African forces for participating in European controls. Tensions among African officers over the unequal gains from such incentives and ambivalence over the rationale for controls, I argue, make the transnational policing of clandestine migration a fraught site of state investment and concern.

  • 32. Gruber, Sabine
    et al.
    Rabo, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Multiculturalism Swedish style: shifts and sediments in educational policies and textbooks2014In: Policy Futures in Education, ISSN 1478-2103, Vol. 12, no 1, 56-66 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Velasquez, Juan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Barrio women's invited and invented spaces against urban elitisation in Chacao, Venezuela2014In: Antipode, ISSN 0066-4812, E-ISSN 1467-8330, Vol. 46, no 3, 835-856 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outright victories against urban elitisation are rare in the current urban revolution. This article highlights how urban elitisation is confronted in Chacao, the most elite and urban part of Venezuela. Initially it reviews how this urban elitisation created the main economic, political and military strongholds of the opposition to the Bolivarian revolution. Then, in contesting it, the urban and Bolivarian revolutions feed each other through women's participation in invited and invented spaces of citizenship. From such spaces, Chacao women in their settler's movement organised struggles of insurgent citizenship to stop elitist urban renewal agendas and develop further forms of insurgent urbanism to conduct an urban renewal from below and establish a New Socialist Community for 600 families. They emerged as a revolutionary class to implement Bolivarian policies addressing the inefficiency and opportunism of the bureaucratic state and contesting urban elitisation with an anti-capitalist and anti-imperialist insurgent urbanism.

  • 34.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Olsson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    The Performance of Early Age Migrants in Education and the Labour Market: a Comparison of Bosnia Herzegovinians, Chileans and Somalis in Sweden2014In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 40, no 5, 778-795 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines how early age immigrants to Sweden from Bosnia-Herzegovina, Chile and Somalia perform in education and the labour market in comparison with the children of natives. As the results demonstrate, the socio-economic position of the parents, family structure and other demographic characteristics of individuals only partially explain the differences between the descendants of natives and young immigrants from these countries. A further analysis demonstrates that the socio-historical contexts into which these immigrant children arrive and settle, that is the processes of migration, are equally likely to have an impact on young immigrants' performance.

  • 35.
    Rabo, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Diasporic dilemmas: Assyrian migration to Sweden and activism for the homeland2013In: Journal of Assyrian Academic Studies, ISSN 1055-6982, Vol. 27, no 1&2, 55-74 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Hannerz, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    A detective story writer: exploring Stockholm as it once was2013In: City & Society, ISSN 0893-0465, Vol. 25, no 2, 260-270 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been a change in the typical setting of detective fiction, from small, closed, tranquil communities to urban contexts of greater opacity and diversity. Its hero/heroine is thus now a recurrent figure in a global genre of urban fiction; and the actual detective story writer is a connoisseur of life in the big city. In this article I point to a certain affinity between detective stories and urban ethnography, and proceed to suggest some contrasts between Swedish writers who have recently achieved international fame and a writer of an earlier generation whom I knew personally. This is a way of demonstrating changes in the urban scene of Stockholm, and transformations in Swedish national society.

  • 37.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Beyond Anti-Anti Trafficking2013In: Dialectical Anthropology, ISSN 0304-4092, E-ISSN 1573-0786, Vol. 37, no 2, 319-323 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Ways of Seeing Ireland’s Green: From Ban to the Branding of a nation2013In: The Senses & Society, ISSN 1745-8927, Vol. 8, no 2, 233-239 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ireland has long been identified as the Green Isle. Drawing on extensive ethnographic research, this article explores the color green in Ireland in terms of visualization and marketing in relation to dress and tourist design. The focus on different ways of seeing Ireland's green reveals the color as an identity marker, highly charged politically and culturally. Starting out as a political statement of Irish identity, green became a marker to outsiders signaling Irishness. The ban on “the wearing of the green” during British colonialism reinforced the significance of green in Ireland. Green was the color of the Republican revolutionary organization, and was identified as the national color long before Ireland became an independent nation in 1922. Now green remains an indicator in outsiders' visual construction of Irishness. The extensive wearing of green on St Patrick's Day, the national day, is a continued celebration of national independence fueled by the legacy of the ban, not only in Ireland but among Irish diaspora communities across the globe. The color green is the signature color in the branding of Ireland as a tourist destination.

  • 39.
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    An Interview with James Siegel2013In: Public culture, ISSN 0899-2363, E-ISSN 1527-8018, Vol. 25, no 3, 559-573 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Tunestad, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Arbetslivets terapeutisering2013In: TAM-revy, ISSN 1654-6997, no 2, 6-7 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41. Barker, Joshua
    et al.
    Harms, Erik
    Lindquist, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Introduction to Special Issue: Figures of Urban Transformation2013In: City & Society, ISSN 0893-0465, Vol. 25, no 2, 159-172 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Social Capital and Stratification of Young People2013In: Journal of Social Inclusion, ISSN 1836-8808, Vol. 1, no 1, 46-58 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper addresses the impact of social capital on the status attainment process of young people at the start of their careers and examines how social class, gender and ethnicity affect the accumulation of social capital and thereby labour market stratification of young people. A sample of young Swedes graduating from vocational schools and universities between 2005 and 2006, was surveyed via the telephone about their experiences acquiring jobs. Two re­search questions are posed: (i) Which characteristics (class, gender and ethnicity) affect young people's access to more social capital? (ii) How is social capital rewarded in the labour market? The results show that being female, coming from the lower social classes and being a member of a stigmatized immigrant groupare associated with a substantial social capital deficit. When socioeconomic and demographic backgrounds as well as the human capital of respondents are controlled, social capital is positively associated with salary level. The results indicate that social capital is a significant factor in the stratification process of young people.

  • 43.
    González, Tania
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Gil Araujo, Sandra
    Montañés Sánchez, Virginia
    Política migratoria y derechos humanos en el Mediterráneo español: El impacto del control migratorio en los tránsitos de la migración africana hacia Europa2013In: Revista de Derecho Migratorio y Extranjería, ISSN 1695-3509, no 33, 245-267 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the entrance of Spain into the EU, the Mediterranean became the southern border of Europe and a focal point of the migratory pressure from Africa to Europe. Since then, the fight against irregular immigration, the increased surveillance and migration control, and the cooperation with countries of migration transit and origin have become core elements of the Spanish migration policy. The imposition of visas to African countries, the border control, the reinforcement of the fence in Ceuta and Melilla, the Frontex development, EUROSUR, SIVE, the Seahorse Project, the return agreements, the joint surveillance patrols at the Atlantic and the Mediterranean, and the inclusion of migration as a theme in Spanish external relations with emigration countries are instruments of externalization and Europeanization of Spanish migration policy.In this article, we focus our attention on the effects of migration control on the Spanish maritime border on the transit of migrants coming from Africa. The experiences of migrants who arrived irregularly in the Andalusian coast between 2010 and 2011 are taken as a case study. In particular, we are interested in exploring the violation offundamental rights throughout the different stages that make up the migration process: starting at the place of origin and the journey experience on land, the situation of migrants at sea, the interception of vessels, landing and retention. We will discuss in more detail the processes of identification, treatment, and protection of particularly vulnerable groups, as well as the gender relations that are embedded within these practices.

  • 44.
    Karlsson, Bengt G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Evading the State: Ethnicity in Northeast India through the Lens of James Scott2013In: Asian Ethnology, ISSN 1882-6865, Vol. 72, no 2, 321-331 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses ethnicity and the state in Northeast India from the vantage point of James Scott’s influential works, especially his recent book The Art of Not Being Governed. Scott has over the years explored different aspects of peasant or subaltern modes of opposing dominance. The overall insistence is on the resistance and agency of the peasant. In the context of the hill societies that Scott deals with in the book, the entire societal design can be understood to be an act of resistance that aims at keeping the state away. As part of this, ethnic identities are portrayed as extremely fluid and remolded to serve political purposes. Scott’s notion of Zomia opens up a new way of thinking about Northeast India. Even so, as I argue, one still ends up thinking of the hills from the perspective of the valley and in so doing we miss aspects of the hill societies and ways of being in the world that cannot be reduced to a state-effect. If one looks more closely at these other aspects, more persistent forms of identification and a sense of belonging might come to the fore. Rather than just trying to escape from the state, people in the hills also hope for another, different, state.

  • 45. Moeran, Brian
    et al.
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Business Anthropology: Towards an anthropology of worth?2013In: Journal of Business Anthropology, ISSN 2245-4217, Vol. 2, no 1, 1-8 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46. Fleming, Peter
    et al.
    Roberts, John
    Garsten, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    In search of corporate social responsibility: introduction to special issue2013In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 20, no 3, 337-348 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introduction to the special issue aims to contextualize and critically comment on the current trajectory of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in both scholarly inquiry and business practice. It suggests that we must place it within the milieu of the ongoing economic crisis and the failure of a number of important opportunities to make business ethical (e.g.   the 2012 Rio + 20 Earth Summit). It then suggests possible future terrain for tenable CSR research (and practice), especially in the context of widespread cynicism and disbelief regarding the claims of business ethicists in industry and the academy.

  • 47.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    Post-political regulation: Soft Power and Post-Political Visions in Global Governance2013In: Critical Sociology, ISSN 0896-9205, E-ISSN 1569-1632, Vol. 39, no 3, 421-437 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The debate on global governance points to shifts in the type and nature of regulation as well as in the set of actors involved. The article introduces a novel way of conceptualizing the changes, namely a move towards post-political forms of regulation (see also Garsten and Jacobsson, 2007). Drawing on Chantal Mouffe’s notion of ‘the post-political vision’, the article argues that many contemporary forms of regulation are premised on consensual relationships as the basis for regulatory activity. These regulatory practices tend to narrow down the conflictual space, thereby exerting a form of soft power. Moreover, in the post-political forms of regulation, unequal power relations tend to be rendered invisible. The empirical cases discussed are voluntary regulatory arrangements, more specifically the Open Method of Coordination of the EU (OMC) and CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) initiatives.

  • 48.
    Garsten, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Jacobsson, Kerstin
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Sorting people in and out: The plasticity of the categories of employability, work capacity and disability as technologies of government2013In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 13, no 4, 825-850 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Olsson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Svenskarna i Spanien – en ny diaspora?2013In: Äldre i centrum, ISSN 1653-3585, no 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 50.
    Karlsson, Bengt G
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Writing development2013In: Anthropology Today, ISSN 0268-540X, E-ISSN 1467-8322, Vol. 29, no 2, 4-7 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Development professionals spend a lot of time writing and the aid industry has a vast production of texts. The author argues here that anthropology of development needs to look anew at how these texts are being produced, circulated and the purposes they serve. I have briefly identified six features of development writing: 1. Institutional ownership, 2. multiple authorship, 3. impersonal style, 4. terminology, 5. Communicable simplifications and 6. temporality. The more general point is to call for a more sophisticated engagement with development texts. There might be more going on in these documents than immediately meets the eye. More than anything else, these texts grant legitimacy and presence to the actors involved in development. Writing development is more about the production process, the language and what it ultimately bring in terms of aid flows, rather than the substance of the text itself.

1234 1 - 50 of 180
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