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  • 1501. Wang, Zhen
    et al.
    Jiang, Wenfeng
    Liu, Jianhui
    Jiang, Weina
    Wang, Yu
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sun, Licheng
    Pendant bases as proton transfer relays in diiron dithiolate complexes inspired by [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase active site2008In: Journal of Organometallic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-328X, Vol. 693, no 17, p. 2828-2834Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1502. Wang, Zhen
    et al.
    Liu, Jian-Hui
    He, Cheng-Jiang
    Jiang, Shi
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sun, Li-Cheng
    Azadithiolates cofactor of the iron-only hydrogenase and its PR3-monosubstituted derivatives: Synthesis, structure, electrochemistry and protonation2007In: Journal of Organometallic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-328X, E-ISSN 1872-8561, Vol. 692, no 24, p. 5501-5507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The core structure (mu-SCH2)(2)NH[Fe-2(CO)(6)](5) of Fe-only hydrogenases active site model has been synthesized by the condensation of iron carbonyl sulfides, formaldehyde and silyl protected amine. Its monosubstituted complexes (mu-SCH2)(2)NH[Fe-2(CO)(5)PR3] (R = Ph (6), Me (7)) were accordingly prepared. The coordination configurations of 5 and 6 were characterized by X-ray crystallography. Protonation of complex 7 to form the N-protonated product occurs in an acetonitrile solution upon addition of triflic acid. The redox properties of these model complexes were studied by cyclic voltammetry.

  • 1503. Wang, Zhen
    et al.
    Liu, Jianhui
    He, Chengjiang
    Jiang, Shi
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sun, Licheng
    Diiron azadithiolates with hydrophilic phosphatriazaadamantane ligand as iron-only hydrogenase active site models: Synthesis, structure, and electrochemical study2007In: Inorganica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0020-1693, E-ISSN 1873-3255, Vol. 360, no 7, p. 2411-2419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three novel complexes (mu-adt)[Fe-2(CO)(5)PTA] (2-PTA), (mu-adt)[Fe-2(CO)(4)PTA(2)](2-PTA(2)) and (mu-adt)[Fe-2(CO)(5)DAPTA] (2-DAPTA), where adt is SCH2N(CH2CH2CH3)CH2S, PTA stands for 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane and DAPTA is 3,7-diacetyl-1,3,7-triaza-5-phosphabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane, were prepared as the models of the iron hydrogenase active site through controlled CO displacement of (mu-adt)[Fe-2(CO)(6)] with PTA and DAPTA. The coordination configurations of 2-PTA and 2-PTA(2) were characterized by X-ray crystallography. The disubstituted diiron complex 2-PTA(2) features a basal/apical coordination mode, instead of the typical transoid basal/basal configuration. Protonation of three complexes only occurred at the bridging-N atom, rather than at the tertiary nitrogen atom on the PTA or DAPTA ligands. Electrochemical properties of the complexes were studied in acetonitrile or a mixture of acetonitrile and water in the presence of acetic acid, by cyclic voltammetry. The current sensitivity of the reduced species to acid concentration in the presence of H2O is greater than in the pure CH3CN solution.

  • 1504. Wangsell, Fredrik
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Karin
    Kvarnström, Ingemar
    Borkakoti, Neera
    Edlund, Michael
    Jansson, Katarina
    Lindberg, Jimmy
    Hallberg, Anders
    Rosenquist, Asa
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of potent BACE-1 inhibitors incorporating a hydroxyethylene isostere as central core2010In: European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0223-5234, E-ISSN 1768-3254, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 870-882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We herein describe the design and synthesis of a series of BACE-1 inhibitors incorporating a P1-substituted hydroxyl ethylene transition state isostere. The synthetic route starting from commercially available carbohydrates yielded a pivotal lactone intermediate with excellent stereochemical control which subsequently could be diversified at the PI-position. The final inhibitors were optimized using three different amines to provide the residues in the P2'-P3' position and three different acids affording the residues in the P2-P3 position. In addition we report on the stereochemical preference of the P1'-methyl substituent in the synthesized inhibitors. All inhibitors were evaluated in an in vitro BACE-I assay where the most potent inhibitor, 34-(R), exhibited a BACE-1 IC50 Value of 3.1 nM.

  • 1505. Wangsell, Fredrik
    et al.
    Nordeman, Patrik
    Savmarker, Jonas
    Emanuelsson, Rikard
    Jansson, Katarina
    Lindberg, Jimmy
    Rosenquist, Asa
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Larhed, Mats
    Investigation of alpha-phenylnorstatine and alpha-benzylnorstatine as transition state isostere motifs in the search for new BACE-1 inhibitors2011In: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0968-0896, E-ISSN 1464-3391, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 145-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inhibition of the BACE-1 protease enzyme has over the recent decade developed into a promising drug strategy for Alzheimer therapy. In this report, more than 20 new BACE-1 protease inhibitors based on alpha-phenylnorstatine, alpha-benzylnorstatine, iso-serine, and beta-alanine moieties have been prepared. The inhibitors were synthesized by applying Fmoc solid phase methodology and evaluated for their inhibitory properties. The most potent inhibitor, tert-alcohol containing (R)-12 (IC(50) = 0.19 mu M) was co-crystallized in the active site of the BACE-1 protease, furnishing a novel binding mode in which the N-terminal amine makes a hydrogen bond to one of the catalytic aspartic acids.

  • 1506.
    Warner, Madeleine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Hydrogen transfer reactions catalyzed by a cyclopentadienyl ruthenium complex: Mechanistic studies and dynamic kinetic resolution.2010Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 1507.
    Warner, Madeleine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Racemization of Olefinic Alcohols by a Cyclopentadienyl Ruthenium Carbonyl Complex: Study of the Inhibiting Effect of the Carbon-Carbon Double BondManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 1508.
    Warner, Madeleine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ruthenium-Catalyzed Hydrogen Transfer Reactions: Mechanistic Studies and Chemoenzymatic Dynamic Kinetic Resolutions2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The main focus of this thesis lies on transition metal-catalyzed hydrogen transfer reactions. In the first part of the thesis, the mechanism for racemization of sec-alcohols with a ruthenium complex, Ru(CO)2Cl(η5-C5Ph5) was studied.

    The reaction between 5-hexen-2-ol and Ru(CO)2(Ot-Bu)(η5-C5Ph5) was studied with the aim to elucidate the origin of the slow racemization observed for this sec-alcohol. Two diastereomers of an alkoxycarbonyl complex, which has the double bond coordinated to ruthenium, were characterized by NMR and in situ FT-IR spectroscopy. The observed inhibition of the rate of racemization for substrates with double bonds provided further confirmation of the importance of a free coordination site on ruthenium for β-hydride elimination. Furthermore, we observed that CO exchange, monitored by 13C NMR using 13CO, occurs with both the precatalyst, Ru(CO)2Cl(η5-C5Ph5), and the active catalytic intermediate, Ru(CO)2(Ot-Bu)(η5-C5Ph5). It was also found that added CO has an inhibitory effect on the rate of racemization of (S)-1-phenylethanol. Both these observations provide strong support for reversible CO dissociation as a key step in the racemization mechanism.

    In the second part of this thesis, Ru(CO)2Cl(η5-C5Ph5) was combined with an enzymatic resolution catalyzed by a lipase, leading to several efficient dynamic kinetic resolutions (DKR). DKR of exocyclic allylic alcohols afforded the corresponding acetates in high yields and with excellent enantiomeric excess (ee). The products were utilized as synthetic precursors for α-substituted ketones and lactones. DKR of a wide range of homoallylic alcohols afforded the products in good to high yields and with high ee. The homoallylic acetates were transformed into 5,6-dihydropyran-2-ones in a short reaction sequence. Furthermore, DKR of a wide range of aromatic β-chloroalcohols afforded the products in high yields and with excellent ee. The β-chloro acetates were further transformed into chiral epoxides.

  • 1509.
    Warner, Madeleine C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mechanistic Aspects on Cyclopentadienylruthenium Complexes in Catalytic Racemization of Alcohols2013In: Accounts of Chemical Research, ISSN 0001-4842, E-ISSN 1520-4898, Vol. 46, no 11, p. 2545-2555Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclopentadienylruthenium complexes commonly serve as efficient transition metal catalysts in the racemization of alcohols. The combination of the racemization reaction with enzymatic resolution leads to dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR). In DKR, a theoretical yield of 100% is possible, making it a powerful tool for enantioselective synthesis. In this Account, we summarize the most important mechanistic aspects of racemization of alcohols reported over the past decade based on both experimental and computational results. Precatalyst activation is often necessary, either by heating the reaction or by adding an alkoxide-type base. The subsequent alcohol-alkoxide exchange is rapid and introduces the substrate into the catalytic cycle. This exchange requires a free coordination site, which may be created via several different mechanisms. Following alkoxide formation, racemization occurs via beta-hydride elimination and subsequent readdition. In cyclopentadienyldicarbonylruthenium alkoxide complexes, which are 18-electron complexes, researchers originally considered two mechanisms for the creation of the free coordination site required for beta-hydride elimination: a change in hapticity of the cyclopentadienyl ligand from eta 5 to eta 3 and dissociation of a CO ligand. Based on computational and experimental results, we have found strong support for the pathway involving CO dissociation. Researchers had also wondered if the substrate remains coordinated to the metal center (the inner-sphere mechanism) during the hydrogen transfer step(s). Using competition and crossover experiments, we found strong evidence for an inner-sphere mechanism. In summary, we have obtained a detailed picture of the racemization of alcohols by cyclopentadienylruthenium catalysts, leading to the development of more efficient catalytic systems for racemization.

  • 1510.
    Warner, Madeleine C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Racemization of Olefinic Alcohols by a Carbonyl(cyclopentadienyl)ruthenium Complex: Inhibition by the Carbon-Carbon Double Bond2015In: European Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 1434-193X, E-ISSN 1099-0690, no 11, p. 2388-2393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, racemization of various olefinic sec-alcohols by Ru(CO)(2)((5)-C5Ph5)Cl was investigated. The racemization of three aliphatic sec-alcohols with different chain lengths containing terminal double bonds was studied. A dramatic decrease of the racemization rate was found for these sec-alcohols compared to that of the corresponding saturated substrates. The slow racemization rate of the former alcohols is ascribed to coordination of the double bond to the ruthenium centre, which blocks the free site needed for -hydride elimination. This mechanism was supported by a recent study, in which 5-hexen-2-ol was found to form an alkoxycarbonyl complex having the double bond coordinated to the ruthenium atom. Aliphatic sec-alcohol substrates with a di- or trisubstituted double bond were found to give a lower degree of inhibition of the racemization rate than the substrates with a monosubstituted double bond.

  • 1511.
    Warner, Madeleine C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Casey, Charles P.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Shvo's Catalyst in Hydrogen Transfer Reactions2011In: BIFUNCTIONAL MOLECULAR CATALYSIS, 2011, p. 85-125Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter reviews the use of Shvo's catalyst in various hydrogen transfer reactions and also discusses the mechanism of the hydrogen transfer. The Shvo catalyst is very mild to use since no activation by base is required in the transfer hydrogenation of ketones or imines or in the transfer dehydrogenation of alcohols and amines. The Shvo catalyst has also been used as an efficient racemization catalyst for alcohols and amines. Many applications of the racemization reaction are found in the combination with enzymatic resolution leading to a dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR). In these dynamic resolutions, the yield based on the starting material can theoretically reach 100%. The mechanism of the hydrogen transfer from the Shvo catalyst to ketones (aldehydes) and imines as well as the dehydrogenation of alcohols and amines has been studied in detail over the past decade. It has been found that for ketones (aldehydes) and alcohols, there is a concerted transfer of the two hydrogens involved, whereas for typical amines and imines, there is a stepwise transfer of the two hydrogens. One important question is whether the substrate is coordinated to the metal or not in the hydrogen transfer step(s). The pathway involving coordination to activate the substrate is called the inner-sphere mechanism, whereas transfer of hydrogen without coordination is called the outer-sphere mechanism. These mechanistic proposals together with experimental and theoretical studies are discussed.

  • 1512.
    Warner, Madeleine C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nagendiran, Anuja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bogár, Krisztián
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Enantioselective Route to Ketones and Lactones from Exocyclic Allylic Alcohols via Metal and Enzyme Catalysis2012In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 14, no 19, p. 5094-5097Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A general and efficient route for the synthesis of enantiomerically pure a-substituted ketones and the corresponding lactones has been developed. Ruthenium- and enzyme-catalyzed dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) with a subsequent Cu-catalyzed alpha-allylic substitution are the key steps of the route. The a-substituted ketones were obtained in high yields and with excellent enantiomeric excess. The methodology was applied to the synthesis of a naturally occurring caprolactone, (R)-10-methyl-6-undecanolide, via a subsequent Baeyer-Villiger oxidation.

  • 1513.
    Warner, Madeleine C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Shevchenko, Grigory A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jouda, Suzan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bogar, Krisztian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Dynamic Kinetic Resolution of Homoallylic Alcohols: Application to the Synthesis of Enantiomerically Pure 5,6-Dihydropyran-2-ones and delta-Lactones2013In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 19, no 41, p. 13859-13864Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dynamic kinetic resolution of various homoallylic alcohols with the use of Candida antarctica lipaseB and ruthenium catalyst 2 afforded homoallylic acetates in high yields and with high enantioselectivity. These enantiopure acetates were further transformed into homoallylic acrylates after hydrolysis of the ester function and subsequent DMAP-catalyzed esterification with acryloyl chloride. After ring-closing metathesis 5,6-dihydropyran-2-ones were obtained in good yields. Selective hydrogenation of the carboncarbon double bond afforded the corresponding -lactones without loss of chiral information.

  • 1514.
    Warner, Madeleine C
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Verho, Oscar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    CO dissociation mechanism in racemization of alcohols by a cyclopentadienyl ruthenium dicarbonyl catalyst2011In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 133, no 9, p. 2820-2823Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    13CO exchange studies of racemization catalyst (η5-Ph5C5)Ru(CO)2Cl and (η5-Ph5C5)Ru(CO)2(Ot-Bu) by 13C NMR spectroscopy are reported. CO exchange for the active catalyst form, (η5-Ph5C5)Ru(CO)2(Ot-Bu) is approximately 20 times faster than that for the precatalyst (η5-Ph5C5)Ru(CO)2Cl. An inhibition on the rate of racemization of (S)-1-phenylethanol was observed on addition of CO. These results support the hypothesis that CO dissociation is a key step in the racemization of sec-alcohols by (η5-Ph5C5)Ru(CO)2Cl, as also predicted by DFT calculations.

  • 1515. Watcharinyanon, Somsakul
    et al.
    Puglia, Carla
    Göthelid, Emmanuelle
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Moons, Ellen
    Johansson, Lars S.O.
    Molecular orientation of thiol-derivatized tetraphenylporphyrin on gold studied by XPS and NEXAFS2009In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 603, no 7, p. 1026-1033Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1516. Wei, Wen-Jie
    et al.
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Liao, Rong-Zhen
    Theoretical Study of the Mechanism of the Nonheme Iron Enzyme EgtB2017In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 56, no 6, p. 3589-3599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    EgtB is a nonheme iron enzyme catalyzing the C - S bond formation between gamma-glutamyl cysteine (gamma GC) and N-alpha-trimethyl histidine (TMH) in the ergothioneine biosynthesis. Density functional calculations were performed to elucidate and delineate the reaction mechanism of this enzyme. Two different mechanisms were considered, depending on whether the sulfoxidation or the S C bond formation takes place first. The calculations suggest that the S - O bond formation occurs first between the thiolate and the ferric superoxide, followed by homolytic O-O bond cleavage, very similar to the case of cysteine dioxygenase. Subsequently, proton transfer from a second-shell residue Tyr377 to the newly generated iron - oxo moiety takes place, which is followed by proton transfer from the TMH imidazole to Tyr377, facilitated by two crystallographically observed water molecules. Next, the S C bond is formed between gamma GC and TMH, followed by proton transfer from the imidazole CH moiety to Tyr377, which was calculated to be the rate-limiting step for the whole reaction, with a barrier of 17.9 kcal/mol in the quintet state. The calculated barrier for the rate-limiting step agrees quite well with experimental kinetic data. Finally, this proton is transferred back to the imidazole nitrogen to form the product. The alternative thiyl radical attack mechanism has a very high barrier, being 25.8 kcal/mol, ruling out this possibility.

  • 1517. Wellens, Adinda
    et al.
    Garofalo, Corinne
    Nguyen, Hien
    Van Gerven, Nani
    Slättegård, Rikard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Hernalsteens, Jean-Pierre
    Wyns, Lode
    Oscarson, Stefan
    De Greve, Henri
    Hultgren, Scott
    Bouckaert, Julie
    Intervening with urinary tract infections using anti-adhesives based on the crystal structure of the FimH-oligomannose-3 complex2008In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 3, no 4, p. e2040; 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1518.
    Wettergren, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Selective transfer hydrogenations: Catalyst development and mechanistic investigations2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    By generating a library of amino acid-based ligands, pseudo-dipeptides, and combining them with transition metals, we have created selective and efficient ruthenium and rhodium catalysts for the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones. The ruthenium-catalyzed reaction was studied in detail, and we found that alkali metals play a crucial role for the reactivity and selectivity of the reaction. Furthermore, we have performed kinetic studies on the catalytic system, and the experimental data does neither support the established inner-sphere nor the classical outer-sphere mechanism. Hence, a novel mechanism for the ruthenium-pseudo-dipeptide-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation is proposed. In this unprecedented outer-sphere mechanism, a hydride and an alkali metal ion are transferred from the donor to the ruthenium complex in the rate determining step.

    In addition, the pseudo-dipeptide ligands were employed in the rhodium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation of aryl alkyl ketones to yield the corresponding alcohols in high yields and excellent enantioselectivities (up to 98% ee). The study revealed that the alkali metals, so important in the ruthenium analogue of the reaction, do not improve the enantioselectivity of the reaction. Deuterium labeling experiments showed that the reaction follows the mono hydridic route.

    Furthermore, a novel method for efficient catalyst screening has been developed. We have demonstrated that ligand synthesis, catalyst formation, and enantioselective catalysis can be performed using an in situ one-pot procedure. The efficacy of the concept was demonstrated in the enantioselective reduction of ketones. In addition to the simplification of the catalyst formation, this approach resulted in improvement of the product ee.

    Finally, the development of a reduction protocol for the transfer hydrogenation of ketones to alcohols without the involvement of transition metal catalysts is described. Using microwave irradiation, a range of ketones was efficiently reduced in high yields using catalytic amounts of lithium 2-propoxide in 2-propanol.

  • 1519.
    Wettergren, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    In Situ Formation of Ligand and Catalyst: Application in Ruthenium-Catalyzed Enantioselective Reduction of Ketones2007In: Regio- and Stereo-Controlled Oxidations and Reductions, Wiley, England , 2007, p. 121-124Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 1520.
    Wettergren, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Buitrago, Elina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ryberg, Per
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mechanistic Investigation on the Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Ketones Catalyzed by Pseudo-Dipeptides Ruthenium complexes2009In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 15, no 23, p. 5709-5718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lithium-powered: A kinetic investigation into the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of non-activated aryl alkyl ketones, catalyzed by N-Boc-protected -amino acid hydroxyamide ruthenium–arene complexes, has revealed that the reactions proceed through an unprecedented bimetallic outer-sphere mechanism. Under optimized conditions, these catalysts provide access to secondary alcohols in high yields and with excellent enantioselectivities (>99 % ee).

    The combination of N-Boc-protected -amino acid hydroxyamides (pseudo-dipeptides) and [{Ru(p-cymene)Cl2}2] resulted in the formation of superior catalysts for the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) of non-activated aryl alkyl ketones in propan-2-ol. The overall kinetics of the ATH of acetophenone to form 1-phenylethanol in the presence of ruthenium pseudo-dipeptide catalysts were studied, and the individual rate constants for the processes were determined. Addition of lithium chloride to the reaction mixtures had a strong influence on the rates and selectivities of the processes. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for the reduction were determined and the results clearly show that the hydride transfer is rate-determining, whereas no KIEs were detected for the proton transfer. From these observations a novel bimetallic outer-sphere-type mechanism for these ATH process is proposed, in which the bifunctional catalysts mediate the transfer of a hydride and an alkali metal ion between the hydrogen donor and the substrate. Furthermore, the use of a mixture of propan-2-ol and THF (1:1) proved to enhance the rates of the ATH reactions. A series of aryl alkyl ketones were reduced under these conditions in the presence of 0.5 mol % of catalyst, and the corresponding secondary alcohols were formed in high yields and with excellent enantioselectivities (>99 % ee) in short reaction times.

  • 1521.
    Wettergren, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Buitrago, Elina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ryberg, Per
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mechanistic investigations into the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones catalyzed by pseudo-dipeptide ruthenium complexes2009In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 15, no 23, p. 5709-5718Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1522.
    Wettergren, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bøgevig, Anders
    Portier, Maude
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Ruthenium-Catalyzed Enantioselective Reduction of Electron-Rich Aryl Alkyl Ketones2006In: Advanced Synthesis and Catalysis, ISSN 1615-4150, Vol. 348, no 10-11, p. 1277-1282Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1523.
    Wettergren, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zaitsev, Alexey
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Rhodium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Aryl Alkyl Ketones Employing Ligands Derived from Amino Acids2007In: Advanced Synthesis and Catalysis, ISSN 1615-4150, Vol. 349, no 17-18, p. 2556-2562Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1524.
    Wettergren, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zaitsev, Alexey B.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones: development of amino acid derived transition metal catalysts2008In: Abstracts of Papers, 235th ACS National Meeting, New Orleans, LA, United States, April 6-10, 2008, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 1525.
    Wettergren, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zaitsev, Alexey B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of aryl alkyl ketones employing ligands derived from amino acids2007In: Advanced Synthesis & Catalysis, ISSN 1615-4150, Vol. 349, p. 2556-2562Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1526.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    A perspective on the primary and three-dimensional structures of carbohydrates2013In: Carbohydrate Research, ISSN 0008-6215, E-ISSN 1873-426X, Vol. 378, p. 123-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbohydrates, in more biologically oriented areas referred to as glycans, constitute one of the four groups of biomolecules. The glycans, often present as glycoproteins or glycolipids, form highly complex structures. In mammals ten monosaccharides are utilized in building glycoconjugates in the form of oligo-(up to about a dozen monomers) and polysaccharides. Subsequent modifications and additions create a large number of different compounds. In bacteria, more than a hundred monosaccharides have been reported to be constituents of lipopolysaccharides, capsular polysaccharides, and exopolysaccharides. Thus, the number of polysaccharide structures possible to create is huge. NMR spectroscopy plays an essential part in elucidating the primary structure, that is, monosaccharide identity and ring size, anomeric configuration, linkage position, and sequence, of the sugar residues. The structural studies may also employ computational approaches for NMR chemical shift predictions (CASPER program). Once the components and sequence of sugar residues have been unraveled, the three-dimensional arrangement of the sugar residues relative to each other (conformation), their flexibility (transitions between and populations of conformational states), together with the dynamics (timescales) should be addressed. To shed light on these aspects we have utilized a combination of experimental liquid state NMR techniques together with molecular dynamics simulations. For the latter a molecular mechanics force field such as our CHARMM-based PARM22/SU01 has been used. The experimental NMR parameters acquired are typically H-1, H-1 cross-relaxation rates (related to NOEs), (3)JCH and (3)JCC trans-glycosidic coupling constants and H-1, C-13-and H-1, H-1-residual dipolar couplings. At a glycosidic linkage two torsion angles phi and psi are defined and for 6-substituted residues also the omega torsion angle is required. Major conformers can be identified for which highly populated states are present. Thus, in many cases a well-defined albeit not rigid structure can be identified. However, on longer timescales, oligosaccharides must be considered as highly flexible molecules since also anti-conformations have been shown to exist with H-C-O-C torsion angles of similar to 180 degrees, compared to syn-conformations in which the protons at the carbon atoms forming the glycosidic linkage are in close proximity. The accessible conformational space governs possible interactions with proteins and both minor changes and significant alterations occur for the oligosaccharides in these interaction processes. Transferred NOE NMR experiments give information on the conformation of the glycan ligand when bound to the proteins whereas saturation transfer difference NMR experiments report on the carbohydrate part in contact with the protein. It is anticipated that the subtle differences in conformational preferences for glycan structures facilitate a means to regulate biochemical processes in different environments. Further developments in the analysis of glycan structure and in particular its role in interactions with other molecules, will lead to clarifications of the importance of structure in biochemical regulation processes essential to health and disease.

  • 1527.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Computational and experimental analysis of oligosaccharide conformation and dynamics2011In: Abstracts of Papers, 241st ACS National Meeting & Exposition, Anaheim, CA, United States, March 27-31, 2011, American Chemical Society (ACS), 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbohydrate structures in the form of glycoconjugates are found in Nature, e.g., as N- and O-linked glycoproteins, glycolipids, short-chain lipopolysaccharides also referred to as lipooligosaccharides and saponins.  The carbohydrate constituent may be studied as part of the glycoconjugate or as oligosaccharides. A number of experimental biophysical techniques are available in order to investigate their conformation and dynamics, in particular, NMR spectroscopy, both in solution and in the solid state, X-ray diffraction on crystals, neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution carried out in the solution state, optical rotation, ultrasonic relaxation and more recently Raman optical activity. Computational approaches including molecular mechanics,1 molecular dynamics simulations,2 ab initio and DFT methods3 may subsequently be employed to study and interpret conformational equilibria based on experimental data. The use of carbon-13 site-specifically synthesized oligosaccharides for obtaining, in particular, conformationally dependent trans-glycosidic homo- and heteronuclear coupling constants and interpretation of conformational equilibria from these based on recently developed Karplus-type relationships for spin-spin coupling constants over three bonds4 will be presented for different oligosaccharides in quest for a description of the population distribution of the torsion angles at the glycosidic linkage.

  • 1528.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    General NMR Spectroscopy of Carbohydrates and Conformational Analysis in Solution2007In: Molecular Interactions Biochemistry of Glycans, Elsevier Ltd , 2007, p. 101-132Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 1529. Wieczorek, Birgit
    et al.
    Träff, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Krumlinde, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Dijkstra, Harm P.
    Egmond, Maarten R.
    van Koten, Gerard
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Klein Gebbink, Robertus J. M.
    Covalent anchoring of a racemization catalyst to CALB-beads: towards dual immobilization of DKR catalysts2011In: Tetrahedron Letters, ISSN 0040-4039, E-ISSN 1359-8562, Vol. 52, no 14, p. 1601-1604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The preparation of a heterogeneous bifunctional catalytic system, combining the catalytic properties of an organometallic catalyst (racemization) with those of an enzyme (enantioselective acylation) is described. A novel ruthenium phosphonate inhibitor was synthesized and covalently anchored to a lipase immobilized on a solid support (CALB, Novozym® 435). The immobilized bifunctional catalytic system showed activity in both racemization of (S)-1-phenylethanol and selective acylation of 1-phenylethanol.

  • 1530. Wieczorek, Birgit
    et al.
    Träff, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Krumlinde, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Dijkstra, Harm P.
    Egmond, Maarten R.
    van Koten, Gerard
    Bäckvall, Jan-Erling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Klein Gebbink, Robertus J.M.
    Site-Specific Covalent Immobilization of a Racemization Catalyst onto Lipase-containing BeadsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis and application of the novel heterogeneous bifunctional catalyst CALB-5 as a racemization and resolution catalyst for the dynamic kinetic resolution is described. The semisynthetic ruthenium lipase hybrid CALB-5 was obtained by inhibiting CALB beads with the novel ruthenium phosphonate complex 5 possessing a lipase active site-directed phosphonate group. By partially inhibiting the lipase beads with 5, a bifunctional catalytic system was obtained. Racemization, by the Ru-catalytic site, gave 0% ee after 24 h, and the kinetic resolution, enzymatic acylation by the uninhibited CALB sites, gave 28% conversion of 1-phenylethanol after 3 h with >99% ee of the acetylated product. A dynamic kinetic resolution experiment of (S)-1-phenylethanol with CALB-5 gave the acylated (R)-product in 18% yield and with >99% ee.

  • 1531.
    Wikmark, Ylva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Engineering Candida antarctica Lipase A for Enantioselective Transformations in Organic Synthesis: Design, Immobilization and Organic Solvent Screening of Smart Enzyme Libraries2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of enzymes as catalysts in organic synthesis constitutes an attractive alternative to conventional chemical catalysis. Enzymes are non-toxic and biodegradable and they can operate under mild reaction conditions. Furthermore, they often display high chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity, enabling specific reactions with single product outcome.

    By the use of protein engineering, enzymes can be altered for the specific needs of the researcher. The major part of this thesis describes engineering of lipase A from Candida antarctica (CalA), for improved enantioselectivity in organic synthetic transformations.

    The first part of the thesis describes a highly combinatorial method for the introduction of mutation sites in an enzyme library. By the simultaneous introduction of nine mutations, we found an enzyme variant with five out of the nine possible mutations. This quintuple variant had an enlarged active site pocket and was enantioselective and active for our model substrate, an ibuprofen ester. This is a bulky substrate for which the wild-type enzyme shows no enantioselectivity and very poor activity.

    In the second part of the thesis, we continued our approach of combinatorial, focused enzyme libraries. This time we aimed at decreasing the alcohol pocket of CalA, in order to increase the enantioselectivity for small and medium-sized secondary alcohols. The enzyme library was bound on microtiter plates and screened by a transacylation reaction in organic solvent. This library yielded an enzyme variant with high enantioselectivity for the model substrate 1-phenyl ethanol, and high to excellent selectivity for other alcohols tested. Screening in organic solvent is advantageous since a potential hit is more synthetically useful.

    In the third part of the thesis, we used manipulated beads of controlled porosity glass (EziG™) for enzyme immobilization, and demonstrated the generality of this carrier for several enzyme classes. EziG™ allowed fast enzyme immobilization with simultaneous purification and yielded active biocatalysts in all cases.

    The last project describes the function of the proposed active site flap in CalA. In our study, we removed this motif. The engineered variant was compared to the wild-type enzyme by testing the amount of interfacial activation and the selectivity for certain alcohols. We showed that the motif is indeed controlling the entrance to the active site and that the flap is not part of the enantioselectivity determining machinery. 

  • 1532.
    Wikmark, Ylva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Engelmark Cassimjee, Karim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lihammar, Richard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Removing the Active-Site Flap in Lipase A from Candida antarctica Produces a Functional Enzyme without Interfacial Activation2016In: ChemBioChem (Print), ISSN 1439-4227, E-ISSN 1439-7633, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 141-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A mobile region is proposed to be a flap that covers the active site of Candida antarctica lipase A. Removal of the mobile region retains the functional properties of the enzyme. Interestingly interfacial activation, required for the wild-type enzyme, was not observed for the truncated variant, although stability, activity, and stereoselectivity were very similar for the wild-type and variant enzymes. The variant followed classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics, unlike the wild type. Both gave the same relative specificity in the transacylation of a primary and a secondary alcohol in organic solvent. Furthermore, both showed the same enantioselectivity in transacylation of alcohols and the hydrolysis of alcohol esters, as well as in the hydrolysis of esters chiral at the acid part.

  • 1533.
    Wikmark, Ylva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Humble, Maria Svedendahl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bäckvall, Jan-E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Combinatorial Library Based Engineering of Candida antarctica Lipase A for Enantioselective Transacylation of sec-Alcohols in Organic Solvent2015In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 54, no 14, p. 4284-4288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method for determining lipase enantioselectivity in the transacylation of sec-alcohols in organic solvent was developed. The method was applied to a model library of Candida antarctica lipase A (CalA) variants for improved enantioselectivity (E values) in the kinetic resolution of 1-phenylethanol in isooctane. A focused combinatorial gene library simultaneously targeting seven positions in the enzyme active site was designed. Enzyme variants were immobilized on nickel-coated 96-well microtiter plates through a histidine tag (His6 -tag), screened for transacylation of 1-phenylethanol in isooctane, and analyzed by GC. The highest enantioselectivity was shown by the double mutant Y93L/L367I. This enzyme variant gave an E value of 100 (R), which is a dramatic improvement on the wild-type CalA (E=3). This variant also showed high to excellent enantioselectivity for other secondary alcohols tested.

  • 1534.
    Willy, Benjamin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Development of pincer complex-catalyzed oxidative C-H activation borylation reactions: Synthetic applications and mechanistic studies2010In: Abstracts of Papers, 239th ACS National Meeting, San Francisco, CA, United States, March 21-25, 2010, Washington D C: American Chemical Society , 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 1535.
    Winqvist, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Studies towards a method for incorporation of 3'-deoxy-3'-C-methylenephosphonate linkages into oligonucleotides2002Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Synthetic strategies towards 3’-deoxy-3’-C-methylenephosphinate building blocks were explored. The key transformations involved stereoselective hydroboration of 1-[2-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl-5-O-(4-methoxytrityl)-3-deoxy-3-C-methylene- ß -D-erythro-pentofuranosyl]uracil to give the corresponding 3’-deoxy-3’-C- hydroxymethyl derivative with ribo-configuration, as well as the further conversion into a precursor with a suitable leaving group, e. g., triflate, for subsequent substitution with the phosphinic acid synthon bis(trimethylsilyl)hypophosphite. Improvements of these steps enabled synthesis of 2’-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl-5’-O-( 4-methoxytrityl)-3’-deoxy-3’-C-methylenephosphinate uridine in a respectable overall yield of 40% over 6 steps, from the corresponding 2’-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl- 5’-O-(4-methoxytrityl)uridine.

    For the introduction of internucleosidic 3’-deoxy-3’-C-methylenephosphonate linkages into oligonucleotides, a preparatory study of the elongation steps, i. e., coupling of the phosphinate building block to the 5’-hydroxyl function of a nucleoside derivative and subsequent oxidation, was performed. Of several coupling reagents studied for the activation of the phosphinate building block prior to coupling, the most promising proved to be N,N-bis(2-oxo-3-oxazolidin-1-yl)phosphinic chloride. The oxidation of the resulting 3’-deoxy-3’-C-methylenephosphinate ester to the corresponding 3’-deoxy-3’-C-methylenephosphonate linkage was achieved using iodine in pyridine-water, in the presence of a catalyst, i. e., either a base (triethylamine) or an acid (pyridinium salt).

  • 1536. Wojcik, Anna
    et al.
    Broclawik, Ewa
    Siegbahn, Per E. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lundberg, Marcus
    Moran, Graham
    Borowski, Tomasz
    Role of Substrate Positioning in the Catalytic Reaction of 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase-A QM/MM Study2014In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 136, no 41, p. 14472-14485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ring hydroxylation and coupled rearrangement reactions catalyzed by 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase were studied with the QM/MM method ONIOM(B3LYP:AMBER). For electrophilic attack of the ferryl species on the aromatic ring, five channels were considered: attacks on the three ring atoms closest to the oxo ligand (C1, C2, C6) and insertion of oxygen across two bonds formed by them (C1-C2, C1-C6). For the subsequent migration of the carboxymethyl substituent, two possible directions were tested (C1-C2, C1-C6), and two different mechanisms were sought (stepwise radical, single-step heterolytic). In addition, formation of an epoxide (side)product and benzylic hydroxylation, as catalyzed by the closely related hydroxymandelate synthase, were investigated. From the computed reaction free energy profiles it follows that the most likely mechanism of 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase involves electrophilic attack on the C1 carbon of the ring and subsequent single-step heterolytic migration of the substituent. Computed values of the kinetic isotope effect for this step are inverse, consistent with available experimental data. Electronic structure arguments for the preferred mechanism of attack on the ring are also presented.

  • 1537.
    Wolpher, Henriette
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ruthenium(II) Polypyridyl Complexes in Supramolecular Systems relevant to Artificial Photosynthesis2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis describes the synthesis and properties of ruthenium complexes relevant to artificial photosynthesis. The work includes preparation of RuIIpolypyridine complexes as well as multi component systems where RuII(bpy)3 or RuII(tpy)2 type complexes are used as photosesnsitizers.

    In the first part, the synthesis and characterisation of bipyridyl(pyridyl)methane type ligands and the corresponding ruthenium(II) bistridentate polypyridyl complexes is described. The bipyridyl-pyridyl methane type ligands were designed to increase the excited state lifetime of ruthenium(II) bisterpyridine-type complexes by altering the ligand field as compared to normal terpyridine ligands.

    In the second part photoinduced electron transfer and formation of charge separated states in donor-photosensitizer dyads or donor-photosensitizer-acceptor triads is studied. The first covalently linked donor-photosensitizer-acceptor triad with tyrosine as electron donor was prepared, and long lived light induced charge separation was observed. RuIIterpyridine complexes linked to carotenoid or tyrosine were also prepared, for studies of light induced charge separation on a TiO2 surface. Tryptofan was covalently linked to Ru(bpy)3 and proton coupled electron transfer from tryptophan to photogenerated ruthenium(III) was demonstrated. A pH-dependent study of the electron transfer rate gave insight into the mechanism of proton coupled electron transfer in amino acids.

    Finally, the last part of the thesis presents the preparation and properties of the first complex containing a photosensitizer covalently linked to a Fe-hydrogenase active site model.

  • 1538.
    Wolpher, Henriette
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Abrahamsson, Maria
    Eriksson, Lars
    Norrby, Per-Ola
    Johansson, Olof
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Hammarström, Leif
    Åkermark, Björn
    Ruthenium complexes of a bipyridyl(pyridyl)methane ligand: Effect of substituents at the methylene group on structure and photophysicsManuscript (Other academic)
  • 1539.
    Wolpher, Henriette
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Borgström, Magnus
    Hammarström, Leif
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Sundström, Villy
    Styring, Stenbjörn
    Sun, Licheng
    Åkermark, Björn
    Synthesis and Properties of an Iron Hydrogenase Active Site Model Linked to Ruthenium tris-Bipyridine Photosensitizer2003In: Inorganic Chemical Communications, Vol. 6, p. 989-991Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1540. Wolpher, Henriette
    et al.
    Johansson, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Abrahamsson, Maria
    Kritikos, Mikael
    Sun, Licheng
    Åkermark, Björn
    A tridentate ligand for preparation of bisterpyridine-like ruthenium(II) complexes with an increased excited state lifetime2004In: Inorganic Chemistry Communications, ISSN 1387-7003, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 337-340Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1541.
    Wolpher, Henriette
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Johansson, Olof
    Abrahamsson, Maria
    Kritikos, Mikael
    Sun, Licheng
    Åkermark, Björn
    A tridentate ligand for preparation of bisterpyridine-like ruthenium(II) complexes with an increased excited state lifetime2004In: Inorganic Chemistry Communications, ISSN 1387-7003, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 337-340Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1542.
    Wolpher, Henriette
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Pan, Jingxi
    Johansson, Anh
    Lundqvist, Maria
    Persson, Petter
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Polivka, Tomas
    Sun, Licheng
    Åkermark, Björn
    Electron transfer studies of terpyridine based ruthenium(II)-donor dyads attached to nanostructured TiO2Manuscript (Other academic)
  • 1543.
    Wolpher, Henriette
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sinha, Subrata
    Pan, Jingxi
    Johansson, Anh
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lundqvist, Maria J.
    Persson, Petter
    Lomoth, Reiner
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Sun, Licheng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sundström, Villy
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Polívka, Tomás
    Synthesis and electron transfer studies of ruthenium-terpyridine-based dyads attached to nanostructured TiO22007In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 638-651Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1544. Wu, Emilia L.
    et al.
    Engström, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jo, Sunhwan
    Stuhlsatz, Danielle
    Yeom, Min Sun
    Klauda, Jeffery B.
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Im, Wonpil
    Molecular Dynamics and NMR Spectroscopy Studies of E. coli Lipopolysaccharide Structure and Dynamics2013In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 105, no 6, p. 1444-1455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacterial outer membranes, comprises three regions: lipid A, core oligosaccharide, and O-antigen polysaccharide. Using the CHARMM36 lipid and carbohydrate force fields, we have constructed a model of an Escherichia coil R1 (core) 06 (antigen) LPS molecule. Several all-atom bilayers are built and simulated with lipid A only (LIPA) and varying lengths of 0 (LPS0), 5 (LPS5), and 10 (LPS10) O6 antigen repeating units; a single unit of 06 antigen contains five sugar residues. From H-1,H-1-NOESY experiments, cross-relaxation rates are obtained from an O-antigen polysaccharide sample. Although some experimental deviations are due to spin-diffusion, the remaining effective proton-proton distances show generally very good agreement between NMR experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results show that increasing the LPS molecular length has an impact on LPS structure and dynamics and also on LPS bilayer properties. Terminal residues in a LPS bilayer are more flexible and extended along the membrane normal. As the core and O-antigen are added, per-lipid area increases and lipid bilayer order decreases. In addition, results from mixed LPS0/5 and LPS0/10 bilayer simulation's show that the LPS O-antigen conformations at a higher concentration of LPS5 and LPS10 are more orthogonal to the membrane and less flexible. The O-antigen concentration of mixed LPS bilayers does not have a significant effect on per-lipid area and hydrophobic thickness. Analysis of ion and water penetration shows that water molecules can penetrate inside the inner core region, and hydration is critical to maintain the integrity of the bilayer structure.

  • 1545. Wu, Emilia L.
    et al.
    Fleming, Patrick J.
    Yeom, Min Sun
    Widmalm, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Klauda, Jeffery B.
    Fleming, Karen G.
    Im, Wonpil
    E. coil Outer Membrane and Interactions with OmpLA2014In: Biophysical Journal, ISSN 0006-3495, E-ISSN 1542-0086, Vol. 106, no 11, p. 2493-2502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is a unique asymmetric lipid bilayer composed of phospholipids (PLs) in the inner leaflet and lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) in the outer leaflet. Its function as a selective barrier is crucial for the survival of bacteria in many distinct environments, and it also renders Gram-negative bacteria more resistant to antibiotics than their Gram-positive counterparts. Here, we report the structural properties of a model of the Escherichia coli outer membrane and its interaction with outer membrane phospholipase A (OmpLA) utilizing molecular dynamics simulations. Our results reveal that given the lipid composition used here, the hydrophobic thickness of the outer membrane is similar to 3 angstrom thinner than the corresponding PL bilayer, mainly because of the thinner LPS leaflet. Further thinning in the vicinity of OmpLA is observed due to hydrophobic matching. The particular shape of the OmpLA barrel induces various interactions between LPS and PL leaflets, resulting in asymmetric thinning around the protein. The interaction between OmpLA extracellular loops and LPS (headgroups and core oligosaccharides) stabilizes the loop conformation with reduced dynamics, which leads to secondary structure variation and loop displacement compared to that in a DLPC bilayer. In addition, we demonstrate that the LPS/PL ratios in asymmetric bilayers can be reliably estimated by the per-lipid surface area of each lipid type, and there is no statistical difference in the overall membrane structure for the outer membranes with one more or less LPS in the outer leaflet, although individual lipid properties vary slightly.

  • 1546. Wångsell, Fredrik
    et al.
    Russo, Francesco
    Sävmarker, Jonas
    Åsa, Rosenquist
    Samuelsson, Bertil
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Larhed, Mats
    Design and synthesis of BACE-1 inhibitors utilizing a tertiary hydroxyl motif as the transition state mimic2009In: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, ISSN 0960-894X, Vol. 19, no 16, p. 4711-4714Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1547. Xia, Ming
    et al.
    Liu, Jianhui
    Gao, Yan
    Åkermark, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Sun, Licheng
    Synthesis and photophysical and electrochemical study of tyrosine covalently linked to high-valent copper(III) and manganese(IV) complexes2007In: Helvetica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0018-019X, Vol. 90, no 3, p. 553-561Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 1548.
    Xu, Chao
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Deiana, Luca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Afewerki, Samson
    Incerti-Pradillos, Celia
    Córdova, Oscar
    Guo, Peng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Córdova, Armando
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry. Mid-Sweden University, Sweden.
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    The Use of Porous Palladium(II)-polyimine in Cooperatively-catalyzed Highly Enantioselective Cascade Transformations2015In: Advanced Synthesis and Catalysis, ISSN 1615-4150, E-ISSN 1615-4169, Vol. 357, no 9, p. 2150-2156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Porous organic polymers have prospects as functional substrates for catalysis, with quite different molecular properties from inorganic substrates. Here we disclose for the first time that porous palladium(II)-polyimines are excellent catalysts for cooperatively catalyzed and enantioselective cascade reactions. In synergy with a chiral amine co-catalyst, polysubstituted cyclopentenes and spirocyclic oxindoles, including the all-carbon quaternary stereocenter, were synthesized in high yields. High diastereo- and enantioselectivities were achieved for these dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformations (DYKAT) of enals with propargylic nucleophiles.

  • 1549.
    Xu, Quan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kerdphon, Sutthichat
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Andersson, Pher G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    C-C Coupling of Ketones with Methanol Catalyzed by a N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Phosphine Iridium Complex2015In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 21, p. 3576-3579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An N-heterocyclic carbene–phosphine iridium complex system was found to be a very efficient catalyst for the methylation of ketone via a hydrogen transfer reaction. Mild conditions together with low catalyst loading (1 mol %) were used for a tandem process which involves the dehydrogenation of methanol, CC bond formation with a ketone, and hydrogenation of the new generated double bond by iridium hydride to give the alkylated product. Using this iridium catalyst system, a number of branched ketones were synthesized with good to excellent conversions and yields.

  • 1550.
    Xu, Quan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Kerdphon, Sutthichat
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Rujirawanich, Janjira
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Krajangsri, Suppachai
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Andersson, Pher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Highly Active Cationic NHC, Phosphine Iridium Catalysts for Base Free Asymmetric Hydrogenation of KetonesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
282930313233 1501 - 1550 of 1639
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