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  • 1. van der Auwera, Johan
    et al.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Dočekal, Mojmír
    Typologie negace2017In: Nový encyklopedický slovník češtiny online / [ed] Petr Karlík, Marek Nekula, Jana Pleskalová, Prague: Nakladatelství Lidové noviny , 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Veselinova, Ljuba N.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The negative existential cycle viewed through the lens of comparative data2016In: Cyclical Change Continued / [ed] Elly van Gelderen, John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2016, p. 139-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a family-based sample is used in order to test the model of evolution of standard negation markers from negative existentials suggested by Croft (1991) and known as the Negative Existential Cycle (NEC). The comparative data collected here were analyzed and classified following the definitions of type/stages suggested in the original model. The data collected here were also analyzed from a diachronic perspective and whenever possible also supplied with historical information. It is found that the stages with variation are dominant in the families under study. Consequently they are considered to be far more important for this cycle than the stages without variation. Furthermore, the stages with variation are not only synchronically frequent, they are also diachronically stable as they can be demonstrated to last for very long periods of time. The data collected here also suggest that the NEC is rarely completed within a time span for reasonable reconstruction. This is attributed to the importance of the distinction between negation of actions and negation of existence and its contant renewal in human languages.

  • 3.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Negation in non-verbal and existential predications: a holistic typology2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Not-yet expressions in the languages of the world: a special negator or a separate gram type?2015In: ALT 2015, 11th Conference of the Association for Linguistic Typology: Abstract Booklet, 2015, p. 136-137Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many languages there is a special negation strategy to indicate that an action has not been accomplished or that a state has not been attained. For instance, in Indonesian, verbal predications are negated by the particle tiada (or tidak), cf (1a). Nominal predications, are negated by the particle bukan, cf. (1c). When the speaker intends to communicate that an action has not been carried out yet, cf. (1b), or a particular state has not been reached yet, cf. (1d), the word belum ‘not yet’ is used in verbal and in nominal predications. The perfect marker sudahcannot be combined with belum or tidak, cf. Sneddon (1996: 202). Expressions like belum are typically dubbed in grammars as special negators that differ from the standard negator (SN). They are sporadically mentioned in the comparative literature on negation cf. (Payne 1985, Miestamo 2005).Van der Auwera (1998) analyzes ‘not yet’ expressions in the languages of Europe as continuative negatives and suggests the label nondum for them; it is adopted here too. However, a systematic cross-linguistic study of their distribution does not yet exist. My goals with this work are to obtain a better understanding about their cross-linguistic frequency as well as about their functions and status in the grammar and lexicon of their respective languages. In my sample of 100 unrelated languages, nondum expressions occur in most areas of the world, but are notably absent in Europe in the form of single, bound or semi-bound, grammaticalized negative temporal markers. My sources are grammars and parallel texts. The available data allow for the following generalizations: (i) Nondum expressions can be encoded as affixes cf. (2) and (3) or as particles, cf (1b, 1d); (ii) they can be either univerbations between SN and another word or completely unsegmentable morphemes. (iii) They typically indicate the non-occurrence of an expected action or state but also an anticipation about its imminent realization. Thus they appear to belong to both the temporal and the negative domain; however, as Contini-Morava (1989: 138), notes the negation they indicate is of limited duration. Their cross-linguistic frequency together with their functional similarities in a number of unrelated languages are evidence that nondum expressions should be considered a separate gram. Furthermore, gaining a better knowledge about them also contributes to a deeper understanding of the semantic-pragmatic asymmetry between the tense-aspect systems of the affirmative and the negative domain.

  • 5.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    'Not-yet'-expressions in the languages of the world: special negative adverbs or a separate gram type?2015In: ALT 2015: 11th Conference of the Association for Linguistic Typology: Abstract Booklet, 2015, p. 136-137Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In many languages there is a special negation strategy to indicate that an action has not been accomplished or that a state has not been attained. For instance, in Indonesian, verbal predications are negated by the particle tiada (or tidak), cf (1a). Nominal predications, are negated by the particle bukan, cf. (1c). When the speaker intends to communicate that an action has not been carried out yet, cf. (1b), or a particular state has not been reached yet, cf. (1d), the word belum ‘not yet’ is used in verbal and in nominal predications. The perfect marker sudahcannot be combined with belum or tidak, cf. Sneddon (1996: 202). Expressions like belum are typically dubbed in grammars as special negators that differ from the standard negator (SN). They are sporadically mentioned in the comparative literature on negation cf. (Payne 1985, Miestamo 2005).Van der Auwera (1998) analyzes ‘not yet’ expressions in the languages of Europe as continuative negatives and suggests the label nondum for them; it is adopted here too. However, a systematic cross-linguistic study of their distribution does not yet exist. My goals with this work are to obtain a better understanding about their cross-linguistic frequency as well as about their functions and status in the grammar and lexicon of their respective languages. In my sample of 100 unrelated languages, nondum expressions occur in most areas of the world, but are notably absent in Europe in the form of single, bound or semi-bound, grammaticalized negative temporal markers. My sources are grammars and parallel texts. The available data allow for the following generalizations: (i) Nondum expressions can be encoded as affixes cf. (2) and (3) or as particles, cf (1b, 1d); (ii) they can be either univerbations between SN and another word or completely unsegmentable morphemes. (iii) They typically indicate the non-occurrence of an expected action or state but also an anticipation about its imminent realization. Thus they appear to belong to both the temporal and the negative domain; however, as Contini-Morava (1989: 138), notes the negation they indicate is of limited duration. Their cross-linguistic frequency together with their functional similarities in a number of unrelated languages are evidence that nondum expressions should be considered a separate gram. Furthermore, gaining a better knowledge about them also contributes to a deeper understanding of the semantic-pragmatic asymmetry between the tense-aspect systems of the affirmative and the negative domain.

  • 6.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    'Not-yet'-expressions in the languages of the world: special negators or a separate cross-linguistic category2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Veselinova, Ljuba N.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Special Negators in the Uralic Languages: Synchrony, Diachrony and Interaction with Standard Negation2015In: Negation in Uralic Languages / [ed] Matti Miestamo, Anne Tamm, Beáta Wagner-Nagy, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015, p. 547-600Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study covers data from 26 Uralic languages and has both a synchronic and a diachronic orientation. The synchronic part includes a detailed description of the negation strategies in sentences such as (i) Mary is not a nurse and (ii) There are no wild cats. The negators used in such clauses are referred to as special negators because they often differ from standard negation. Their formal and semantic features are discussed but they are also viewed in a broader typological setting. As regards diachrony, the origin of the special negators is traced and the Negative Existential Cycle (Croft 1991) is tested on the Uralic data. Some modifications of the model are suggested as a result of this application.

  • 8.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The Negative Existential Cycle Revisited2014In: Linguistics, ISSN 2072-8379, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 1327-1389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on crosslinguistic data and the postulation of six language types, the Negative Existential Cycle was proposed by Croft (1991) as a way of modeling the evolution of standard negation markers from existential negators. The current investigation tests this model by applying it to two language families, Slavonic and Polynesian, checking which cycle types are instantiated in these families and outlining pathways of transition between different types. In Slavonic, we observe one type without variation and two types with internal variation. All cycle types are instantiated in Polynesian, which is correlated with characteristics specific to this family. Three pathways are outlined for the partial or complete transfer of negative existentials into the verbal domain. The first is contingent on negative existentials being used in specific constructions and the direct inheritance or expansion of use of these constructions; the second involves negative existentials being used as emphatic negators external to the proposition and their subsequent reanalysis as clause internal negators without any additional pragmatic content. The third pathway, observed in Polynesian only, is through subordination processes leading to the re-interpretation of negative existentials as general markers of negation. Additionally, a time dimension needs to be added when modeling this cycle, as its completion, i.e., the negative existential turning into a full-fledged marker of standard negation, appears to take longer than 2,000 years.

  • 9.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Lexicalization of Negative Senses: A Crosslinguistic Study2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Negative existentials: a cross linguistic study2013In: Rivista di Linguistica = Italian Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 1120-2726, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 107-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to provide a cross-linguistic outline of the negation strategies in existential predications like ‘There are no mice in the basement’. It is found that there is a strong cross-linguistic tendency to use a special negation strategy in these predications. Furthermore, the special negators, labelled here ‘negative existentials’, show a number of similarities in terms of their semantics, morphosyntax, use and diachronic origin. In light of this, it is suggested that they represent a linguistic construction of its own, and in fact, a separate conceptual domain.

  • 11.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Suppletion2013In: Oxford Bibliographies, Oxford University Press, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Applying the Negative Existential Cycle on the Uralic Language Family2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Suppletion in Verb Paradigms2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Typology of negation in existential sentences2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Digitiziting legacy data for linguistic GIS-applications. Presentation at the Language Mapping2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Bond, Oliver
    SOAS.
    Sampling Isolates2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Standard and Special Negators in the Uralic Languages2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The Negative Existential Cycle Revisited2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Standard and Special Negators in the Slavonic Languages: Synchrony and Diachrony2010In: Diachronic Syntax of the Slavonic Languages / [ed] Hansen, Björn and Jasmina Grkovic-Major, Vienna: Wiener Slawistischen Almanach , 2010, p. 197-210Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Standard and Special Negators: their evolution and interaction2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Non-verbal and existential negators: a cross-linguistic and a historical-comparative study2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Booza, Jason
    Studying the Multilingual City: a GIS-based approach2009In: Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, ISSN 0143-4632, E-ISSN 1747-7557, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 145-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Work in two distinct disciplines, urban geography and sociolinguistics, readilypoints out the multiethnic and multilingual character of metropolitan areas.However, there is still demand for studies which establish the language structure of modern cities. For the purposes of this pilot study, we focus on the Detroit Metropolitan Area (DMA), Michigan. GIS technology together with census data were used to arrive at an adequate description of the spatial distribution of languages currently spoken in Detroit and its immediate surroundings. Data from the 2000 US Census are entered into a GIS system and presented visually with a subsequent analysis of the emerging spatial patterns. Due to limitations of the data, we had to restrict the mapping to languages used at home. The study suggests one possible model for the initial stages of mapping the multilingual city; moreover, the data analysed here provide the infra-structure necessary for further research on phenomena such as language shift and language death as well as other aspects of a dynamic multilingual situation.

  • 23.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Allmän språkvetenskap.
    Suppletion in verb paradigms2007In: New Challenges in typology: Broadening the horizons and redefining the foundations, 2007Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The sixteen chapters in this volume are written by typologists and typologically oriented field linguists who have completed their Ph.D. theses in the first four years of this millennium. The authors address selected theoretical questions of general linguistic relevance drawing from a wealth of data hitherto unfamiliar to the general linguistic audience. The general aim is to broaden the horizons of typology by revisiting existing typologies with larger language samples, exploring domains not considered in typology before, taking linguistic diversity more seriously, strengthening the connection between typology and areal linguistics, and bridging the gap to other fields, such as historical linguistics and sociolinguistics.

    The papers cover grammatical phenomena from phonology, morphology up to the syntax of complex sentences. The linguistic phenomena scrutinized include the following: foot and stress, tone, infixation, inflection vs. derivation, word formation, polysynthesis, suppletion, person marking, reflexives, alignment, transitivity, tense-aspect-mood systems, negation, interrogation, converb systems, and complex sentences. More general methodological and theoretical issues, such as reconstruction, markedness, semantic maps, templates, and use of parallel corpora, are also addressed.

    The contributions in this volume draw from many traditional fields of linguistics simultaneously, and show that it is becoming harder and maybe also less desirable to keep them separate, especially when taking a broadly cross-linguistic approach to language. The book is of interest to typologists and field linguists, as well as to any linguists interested in theoretical issues in different subfields of linguistics.

  • 24.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Towards a typology of negation of non-verbal and existential sentences2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. Allmän språkvetenskap.
    Suppletion in verb paradigms: Bits and pieces of a puzzle2006Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This book examines stem change in verb paradigms, as in English go 'go.PRESENT' vs. went 'go.PAST', a phenomenon referred to as suppletion in current linguistic theory. The work is based on a broad sample of 193 languages, and examines this long neglected phenomenon from a typological perspective. In addition to identifying types of suppletion which occur cross-linguistically, the study brings to light areal patterns of the occurrence of suppletive forms in verb paradigms. Several hypotheses as regards the diachronic development of suppletive forms are presented as well. The author also seeks to explore the methodological issues of evaluating the frequency of linguistic features in large language samples by introducing a method of weighting languages according to their genetic relatedness. All figures obtained in this way are compared to the proportions yielded by more familiar counting methods, and the results and implications of the different procedures are compared and discussed throughout.

  • 26.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Cross-linguistic distribution of numeral derivatives2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was inspired by the work of Bauer (2000) where this author presents an overview of the semantic categories commonly expressed by derivational morphology and ranks them as regards their cross-linguistic frequency. In a similar fashion, the current paper explores the domain of derived numerals, that is ordinal, multiplicative, distributive, collective and other words which are derived from a numeral base, typically from a cardinal numeral, as for instance in Modern Greek trís ’three’ vs. trí-tos ’third’, trí-plos ’triples’, tri-áδa ’a group of three’, trí trí ’three by three’ (Joseph and Philipaki-Warburton 1987: 206-9). The purpose of this project is to outline the crosslinguistic distribution of such derivations as well as to give a general description of the strategies used for the expression of derived numeral senses such as ordinal ’Nth in a sequence’, multiplicative ’N number of times’, etc. The sample used for the pilot study is rather small: currently, it consists of 33 languages, each representing a different language family; it can be seen as geographically balanced in that all six geographical areas, outlined in Dryer (1992) are represented by at least five languages (see next page for the language list). The materials used are grammars or equivalent language descriptions.

    The data allow for several generalizations as regards numeral derivatives that have so far (to my knowledge) passed without notice cf. (Hurford 1987, Gvozdanovic 1999). Specifically, some numeral derivatives are very common in that they are observed in a large amount of the investigated languages while others appear to be rare since they are observed in very few languages, typically, only one. In eight languages of the current sample there are no numeral derivatives of any kind.

    The most common numeral derivatives are ordinal numerals as in shown by Modern Greek trí-tos ’third’ above, (22 languages), followed by multiplicatives (19 languages) as in Bagirmi mwot-dokkene ’ten times’, cf. dokkene ’ten’ (Stevenson 1969: 155-7), and finally distributives (14 languages) as in Lezgian q’we-q’we(d) ’two each’, cf. q’we ’two’ (Haspelmath 1993: 235) . For the most part, ordinals as well as multiplicatives are derived by affixation, while the derivational strategies for distributives vary more: the predominant means appears to be suffixation, followed by reduplication as well as semi-bound constructions where postposed clitics or repetition are used.

    Collective numerals, which express the sense ’a group of N’, as in Cahuilla kwansúple-kwal ’a group of six’, cf. kwansúple ’six’ (Seiler 1977: 333), are commonly derived by means of suffixes, and are observed in 10 languages. Expressions for the sense ’almost N’, with a numeral as a head, as in Brahui bīst-as ’twenty or so’ (Bray 1986: 73), are reported in the grammars of 15 languages. However, expressions for the sense ’almost N’ are derived by bound morphological means in 8 of them; in the remaining 7 languages this sense is expressed by various kinds of periphrastic constructions, including juxtapposition of two numerals.

    Numeral derivatives which appear as rare in the current data are those expressing age as in Modern Greek, sarandapend-áris ’forty-five-years old’ cf. sarandapende ’forty-five’ or numeral expressions for the sense ’all of N’, labeled as inclusive numerals as in Lezgian pud-ni ‘three-two’ =’all three’ (Haspelmath 1993: 234).

    The current sample allows for some broad hints as regards the cross-linguistic distribution of numeral derivatives. What appears from the current data is that some ordinals, multiplicatives and distributives are the most common numeral derivations; furthermore, it might be possible to set up an implicational scale for their occurrence in a language but this is contingent on collecting more data. Some areal patterns can be noted, though, again more data are necessary in order to make stronger conclusions in this regard.

  • 27.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Random SamplesIn: WSK Dictionary on Theories and Methods in Linguistics.Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Veselinova, Ljuba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Sampling ProceduresIn: WSK Dictionary on Theories and Methods in LinguisticsArticle, review/survey (Other academic)
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