Change search
Refine search result
1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. de la Iglesia, Horacio O.
    et al.
    Moreno, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Louzada, Fernando
    Marqueze, Elaine
    Levandovski, Rosa
    Pilz, Luisa K.
    Valeggia, Claudia
    Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo
    Golombek, Diego A.
    Czeisler, Charles A.
    Skene, Debra J.
    Duffy, Jeanne F.
    Roenneberg, Till
    Ancestral sleep2016In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 26, no 7, p. R271-R272Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While we do not yet understand all the functions of sleep, its critical role for normal physiology and behaviour is evident. Its amount and temporal pattern depend on species and condition. Humans sleep about a third of the day with the longest, consolidated episode during the night. The change in lifestyle from hunter-gatherers via agricultural communities to densely populated industrialized centres has certainly affected sleep, and a major concern in the medical community is the impact of insufficient sleep on health 1 and 2. One of the causal mechanisms leading to insufficient sleep is altered exposure to the natural light–dark cycle. This includes the wide availability of electric light, attenuated exposure to daylight within buildings, and evening use of light-emitting devices, all of which decrease the strength of natural light–dark signals that entrain circadian systems [3].

  • 2. Eckerberg, Berndt
    et al.
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Nagai, Roberta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Melatonin treatment effects on adolescent students' sleep timing and sleepiness in a placebo-controlled crossover study2012In: Chronobiology International, ISSN 0742-0528, E-ISSN 1525-6073, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 1239-1248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last few decades, the incidence of sleep-onset insomnia, due to delay of circadian phase, has increased substantially among adolescents all over the world. We wanted to investigate whether a small dose of melatonin given daily, administered in the afternoon, could advance the sleep timing in teenagers. Twenty-one students, aged 14-19 yrs, with sleep-onset difficulties during school weeks were recruited. The study was a randomized, double blind, placebo (PL)-controlled crossover trial, lasting 5 wks. During the first 6 d in wks 2 and 4, the students received either PL or melatonin (1 mg) capsules between 16:30 and 18:00 h. During the first 6 d of wk 5, all students received melatonin. Wks 1 and 3 were capsule-free. In the last evening of each week and the following morning, the students produced saliva samples at home for later melatonin analysis. The samples were produced the same time each week, as late as possible in the evening and as early as possible in the morning. Both the student and one parent received automatic mobile text messages 15 min before saliva sampling times and capsule intake at agreed times. Diaries with registration of presumed sleep, subjective sleepiness during the day (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale, KSS) and times for capsule intake and saliva samplings were completed each day. Primary analysis over 5 wks gave significant results for melatonin, sleep and KSS. Post hoc analysis showed that reported sleep-onset times were advanced after melatonin school weeks compared with PL school weeks (p  <  .005) and that sleep length was longer (p  <  .05). After the last melatonin school week, the students fell asleep 68 min earlier and slept 62 min longer each night compared with the baseline week. Morning melatonin values in saliva diminished compared with PL (p  <  .001) and evening values increased (p  <  .001), indicating a possible sleep phase advance. Compared with PL school weeks, the students reported less wake up (p  <  .05), less school daytime sleepiness (p  <  .05) and increased evening sleepiness (p  <  .005) during melatonin weeks. We conclude that a small dose of melatonin given daily, administered in the afternoon, could advance the sleep timing and make the students more alert during school days even if they continued their often irregular sleep habits during weekends.

  • 3. Fischer, F M
    et al.
    Radosevic-Vidacek, B
    Koscec, A
    Teixeira, L R
    Moreno, C R C
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Internal and external time conflicts in adolescents: Sleep characteristics and interventions2008In: Mind, Brain, and Education, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 17-23Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Internal and external time conflicts in adolescents: Sleep characteristics and interventions

    Daytime fatigue and lack of sleep seem to increase throughout adolescent years. Several environmental, psychological, and biological factors have been associated with the development of sleep across adolescence. The aim of the present article is to summarize these factors and to give examples of various outcomes in sleep patterns among adolescents studied in different cultural settings. It is obvious from earlier work that many adolescents have displaced circadian rhythms and lack of adaptation to school hours due to an early school start or additional burdens for work.

    Several interventions have aimed to help the adaptation process by supporting sleep processes and changing scheduling, in this way promoting classroom alertness. In summary, adolescents worldwide shorten their sleep due to schoolwork hours and additional work, especially by disturbing their sleep due to circadian misalignment.

  • 4.
    Garefelt, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Insomnia among day and shift workers above the arctic circle – associations with stress, light deprivation and underground work2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5. Kaida, Kosuke
    et al.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Takahashi, Masaya
    Vestergren, Peter
    Gillberg, Mats
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Kecklund, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Portin, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Performance prediction by sleepiness-related subjective symptoms during 26-hour sleep deprivation2008In: Sleep and Biological Rhythms, ISSN 1446-9235, E-ISSN 1479-8425, Vol. 6, p. 234-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sleepiness is a major cause of lower productivity and higher risk of accidents in various work situation. Developing sleepiness monitoring techniques is important to important to improve work efficiency and to reduce accident risk, so that people can take a rest/break in appropriate timing before an accident or a mistake occurs. The aim of the present study are (1) to explain subjective sleepiness using sleep-related symptoms, and (2) to examine which symptoms are useful to predict performance errors. Participants were healthy paid volunteers (six males, six females; mean ± SD, 31.5 ± 10.74 years). Participants took part in 26-h sleep deprivation. During sleep deprivation, they carried out several performance tasks every 3 h and an hourly rating of questionnaires to evaluate subjective symptoms including two types of Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS). The present study confirmed that performance errors can be predicted by subjective symptoms. While mental fatigue was correlated to KSS scores linearly, eye-related subjective symptoms showed quadratic correlation to KSS. By taking into consideration this noteworthy relationskap between subjective symptoms and sleepiness, more accurate introspection of sleepiness and performance errors prediction (detection) may be possible.

  • 6.
    Kecklund, Göran
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Milia, Lee Di
    Axelsson, John
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    20th International Symposium on Shiftwork and Working Time: Biological Mechanisms, Recovery, and Risk Management in the 24-h Society2012In: Chronobiology International, ISSN 0742-0528, E-ISSN 1525-6073, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 531-536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This dedicated issue of Chronobiology International is devoted to the selected proceedings of the 20th International Symposium on Shift Work and Working Time held in Stockholm, Sweden, 28 June to 1 July 2011. It constitutes the fifth such issue of the journal since 2004 dedicated to the selected proceedings to the meetings of the Working Time Society. The key theme of the 20th Symposium was "Biological Mechanisms, Recovery, and Risk Management in the 24-h Society." The collection of papers of this dedicated issue represents the best of contemporary research on the effects of night and rotating shift schedules on worker health and safety. The contents cover such topics as sleep restriction, injuries, health, and performance of night work and rotating shiftwork, plus light treatment as a countermeasure against the circadian disruption of shiftwork. The majority of the papers are observational field studies, including some of large sample size, and three studies are well-designed laboratory experiments. (Author correspondence: goran.kecklund@stress.su.se ).

  • 7.
    Lowden, Arne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Garefelt, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Winter depression among day and shift workers above the arctic circle2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Lowden, Arne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Kecklund, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjorn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Daylight exposure in the in-door working population in Sweden, relation to sleep, wakefulness and health2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Lowden, Arne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Lemos, Nelson A. M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Gonçalves, Bruno S. B.
    Öztürk, Gülçin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Louzada, Fernando
    Pedrazzoli, Mario
    Moreno, Claudia R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Delayed Sleep in Winter Related to Natural Daylight Exposure among Arctic Day Workers2018In: Clocks & Sleep, E-ISSN 2624-5175, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 105-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural daylight exposures in arctic regions vary substantially across seasons. Negative consequences have been observed in self-reports of sleep and daytime functions during the winter but have rarely been studied in detail. The focus of the present study set out to investigate sleep seasonality among indoor workers using objective and subjective measures. Sleep seasonality among daytime office workers (n = 32) in Kiruna (Sweden, 67.86° N, 20.23° E) was studied by comparing the same group of workers in a winter and summer week, including work and days off at the weekend, using actigraphs (motion loggers) and subjective ratings of alertness and mood. Actigraph analyses showed delayed sleep onset of 39 min in winter compared to the corresponding summer week (p < 0.0001) and shorter weekly sleep duration by 12 min (p = 0.0154). A delay of mid-sleep was present in winter at workdays (25 min, p < 0.0001) and more strongly delayed during days off (46 min, p < 0.0001). Sleepiness levels were higher in winter compared to summer (p < 0.05). Increased morning light exposure was associated with earlier mid-sleep (p < 0.001), while increased evening light exposure was associated with delay (p < 0.01). This study confirms earlier work that suggests that lack of natural daylight delays the sleep/wake cycle in a group of indoor workers, despite having access to electric lighting. Photic stimuli resulted in a general advanced sleep/wake rhythm during summer and increased alertness levels.

  • 10.
    Lowden, Arne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Nagai, Roberta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Mild, Kjell Hansson
    Hillert, Lena
    Effects of evening exposure to electromagnetic fields emitted by 3G mobile phones on health and night sleep EEG architecture2019In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 28, no 4, article id UNSP e12813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on sleep after exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields have shown mixed results. We investigated the effects of double-blind radiofrequency exposure to 1,930-1,990 MHz, UMTS 3G signalling standard, time-averaged 10 g specific absorption rate of 1.6 W kg(-1) on self-evaluated sleepiness and objective electroencephalogram architecture during sleep. Eighteen subjects aged 18-19 years underwent 3.0 hr of controlled exposure on two consecutive days 19:45-23:00 hours (including 15-min break); active or sham prior to sleep, followed by full-night 7.5 hr polysomnographic recordings in a sleep laboratory. In a cross-over design, the procedure was repeated a week later with the second condition. The results for sleep electroencephalogram architecture showed no change after radiofrequency exposure in sleep stages compared with sham, but power spectrum analyses showed a reduction of activity within the slow spindle range (11.0-12.75 Hz). No differences were found for self-evaluated health symptoms, performance on the Stroop colour word test during exposure or for sleep quality. These results confirm previous findings that radiofrequency post-exposure in the evening has very little influence on electroencephalogram architecture but possible on spindle range activity.

  • 11.
    Lowden, Arne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    van der Zande, BMI
    Geerdinc, L
    Change to higher illuminance and light colour temperature in open office, implications for sleep and sleepiness in Scandinavian winter2014In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 23, no Suppl., p. 178-179, article id P586Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Lowden, Arne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Assessment of a new dynamic light regimen in a nuclear power control room without windows on quickly rotating shiftworkers-effects on health, wakefulness, and circadian alignment: a pilot study2012In: Chronobiology International, ISSN 0742-0528, E-ISSN 1525-6073, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 641-649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to test whether a new dynamic light regime would improve alertness, sleep, and adaptation to rotating shiftwork. The illumination level in a control room without windows at a nuclear power station was ∼200 lux (straight-forward horizontal gaze) using a weak yellow light of 200 lux, 3000 K (Philips Master TLD 36 W 830). New lighting equipment was installed in one area of the control room above the positions of the reactor operators. The new lights were shielded from the control group by a distance of >6 m, and the other operators worked at desks turned away from the new light. The new lights were designed to give three different light exposures: (i) white/blue strong light of 745 lux, 6000 K; (ii) weak yellow light of 650 lux, 4000 K; and (iii) yellow moderate light of 700 lux, 4000 K. In a crossover design, the normal and new light exposures were given during a sequence of three night shifts, two free days, two morning shifts, and one afternoon shift (NNN + MMA), with 7 wks between sessions. The operators consisted of two groups; seven reactor operators from seven work teams were at one time exposed to the new equipment and 16 other operators were used as controls. The study was conducted during winter with reduced opportunities of daylight exposure during work, after night work, or before morning work. Operators wore actigraphs, filled in a sleep/wake diary, including ratings of sleepiness on the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) every 2 h, and provided saliva samples for analysis of melatonin at work (every 2nd h during one night shift and first 3 h during one morning shift). Results from the wake/sleep diary showed the new light treatment increased alertness during the 2nd night shift (interaction group × light × time, p < .01). Time of waking was delayed in the light condition after the 3rd night shift (group × light, p < .05), but the amount of wake time during the sleep span increased after the 2nd night shift (p < .05), also showing a tendency to affect sleep efficiency (p < .10). Effects on circadian phase were difficult to establish given the small sample size and infrequent sampling of saliva melatonin. Nonetheless, it seems that appropriate dynamic light in rooms without windows during the dark Nordic season may promote alertness, sleep, and better adaptation to quickly rotating shiftwork. (Author correspondence: arne.lowden@stress.su.se ).

  • 13.
    Lowden, Arne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Ingre, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Wiholm, Clairy
    Hillert, Lena
    Kuster, Niels
    Nilsson, Jens P.
    Arnetz, Bengt
    Sleep after mobile phone exposure in subjects with mobile phone-related symptoms2011In: Bioelectromagnetics, ISSN 0197-8462, E-ISSN 1521-186X, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 4-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies show increases in activity for certain frequency bands (10-14 Hz) and visually scored parameters during sleep after exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. A shortened REM latency has also been reported. We investigated the effects of a double-blind radiofrequency exposure (884 MHz, GSM signaling standard including non-DTX and DTX mode, time-averaged 10 g psSAR of 1.4 W/kg) on self-evaluated sleepiness and objective EEG measures during sleep. Forty-eight subjects (mean age 28 years) underwent 3 h of controlled exposure (7:30-10:30 PM; active or sham) prior to sleep, followed by a full-night polysomnographic recording in a sleep laboratory. The results demonstrated that following exposure, time in Stages 3 and 4 sleep (SWS, slow-wave sleep) decreased by 9.5 min (12%) out of a total of 78.6 min, and time in Stage 2 sleep increased by 8.3 min (4%) out of a total of 196.3 min compared to sham. The latency to Stage 3 sleep was also prolonged by 4.8 min after exposure. Power density analysis indicated an enhanced activation in the frequency ranges 0.5-1.5 and 5.75-10.5 Hz during the first 30 min of Stage 2 sleep, with 7.5-11.75 Hz being elevated within the first hour of Stage 2 sleep, and bands 4.75-8.25 Hz elevated during the second hour of Stage 2 sleep. No pronounced power changes were observed in SWS or for the third hour of scored Stage 2 sleep. No differences were found between controls and subjects with prior complaints of mobile phone-related symptoms. The results confirm previous findings that RF exposure increased the EEG alpha range in the sleep EEG, and indicated moderate impairment of SWS. Furthermore, reported differences in sensitivity to mobile phone use were not reflected in sleep parameters.

  • 14.
    Lowden, Arne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Öztürk,, Gülçin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Reynolds, Amy
    Bjorvatn, Bjorn
    Working Time Society consensus statements: Evidence based interventions using light to improve circadian adaptation to working hours2019In: Industrial Health, ISSN 0019-8366, E-ISSN 1880-8026, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 213-227Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interventions and strategies to improve health through the management of circadian (re) adaptation have been explored in the field, and in both human and animal laboratory manipulations of shiftwork. As part of an initiative by the Working Time Society (WTS) and International Committee on Occupational Health (ICOH), this review summarises the literature on the management of circadian (re) adaption using bright light treatment. Recommendations to maximise circadian adaptation are summarised for practitioners based on a variety of shiftwork schedules. In slowly rotating night shift schedules bright light appears most suitable when used in connection with the first three night shifts. These interventions are improved when combined with orange glasses (to block blue-green light exposure) for the commute home. Non-shifting strategies involve a lower dosage of light at night and promoting natural daylight exposure during the day (also recommended for day shifts) in acordance with the phase and amplitude response curves to light in humans.

  • 15. Marqueze, E. C.
    et al.
    Vasconcelos, S.
    Garefelt, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Fischer, Frida M.
    Skene, D. J.
    Moreno, C. R. C.
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Difficulty falling asleep and daylight exposure: differences between Brazilian and Swedish workers2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Marqueze, Elaine Cristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. University of Sao Paulo, Brazil; Catholic University of Santos, Brazil.
    Vasconcelos, Suleima
    Garefelt, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Skene, Debra J.
    Moreno, Claudia Roberta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Natural Light Exposure, Sleep and Depression among Day Workers and Shiftworkers at Arctic and Equatorial Latitudes2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 4, article id e0122078Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between individual natural light exposure, sleep need, and depression at two latitudes, one extreme with a few hours of light per day during winter, and the other with equal hours of light and darkness throughout the year.

    METHODS: This cross-sectional study included a sample of Brazilian workers (Equatorial, n = 488 workers) and a Swedish sample (Arctic, n = 1,273).

    RESULTS: The reported mean total natural light exposure per 4-week cycle differed significantly between the Equatorial and Arctic regions. However, shiftworkers from both sites reported similar hours of natural light exposure. Short light exposure was a predictor for insufficient sleep.

    CONCLUSION: Reduced exposure to natural light appears to increase the perception of obtaining insufficient sleep. Arctic workers were more prone to develop depression than Equatorial workers.

  • 17. Martins, Andressa Juliane
    et al.
    Vasconcelos, Suleima Pedroza
    Skene, Debra Jean
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    de Castro Moreno, Claudia Roberta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Effects of physical activity at work and life-style on sleep in workers from an Amazonian Extractivist Reserve2016In: Sleep Science, ISSN 1984-0659, E-ISSN 1984-0063, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 289-294Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity has been recommended as a strategy for improving sleep. Nevertheless, physical effort at work might not be not the ideal type of activity to promote sleep quality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of type of job (low vs. high physical effort) and life-style on sleep of workers from an Amazonian Extractivist Reserve, Brazil. A cross-sectional study of 148 low physical activity (factory workers) and 340 high physical activity (rubber tappers) was conducted between September and November 2011. The workers filled out questionnaires collecting data on demographics (sex, age, occupation, marital status and children), health (reported morbidities, sleep disturbances, musculoskeletal pain and body mass index) and life-style (smoking, alcohol use and practice of leisure-time physical activity). Logistic regression models were applied with the presence of sleep disturbances as the primary outcome variable. The prevalence of sleep disturbances among factory workers and rubber tappers was 15.5% and 27.9%, respectively. The following independent variables of the analysis were selected based on a univariate model (p<0.20): sex, age, marital status, work type, smoking, morbidities and musculoskeletal pain. The predictors for sleep disturbances were type of job (high physical effort); sex (female); age (>40 years), and having musculoskeletal pain (≥5 symptoms). Rubber tapper work, owing to greater physical effort, pain and musculoskeletal fatigue, was associated with sleep disturbances. Being female and older than 40 years were also predictors of poor sleep. In short, these findings suggest that demanding physical exertion at work may not improve sleep quality.

  • 18.
    Moreno, Claudia R. C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Vasconcelos, Suleima
    Marqueze, Elaine C.
    Musculoskeletal pain and insomnia among workers with different occupations and working hours2016In: Chronobiology International, ISSN 0742-0528, E-ISSN 1525-6073, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 749-753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have shown a bidirectional relationship between insomnia and pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether working hours and type of occupation are associated with insomnia, pain and insomnia plus pain. Insomnia and musculoskeletal pain symptoms were measured in airline pilots, rural workers and factory workers using validated indexes. Rural and night work were predictors for the outcomes (insomnia and pain). However, musculoskeletal pain was found to be a predictor of insomnia but not vice versa. The current findings suggest that working hours and type of occupation play a role in the sleep-pain relationship.

  • 19.
    Moreno, Claudia R. C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Vasconcelos, S.
    Marqueze, E. C.
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Middleton, B.
    Fischer, F. M.
    Louzada, F. M.
    Skene, D. J.
    Impact of electricity on sleep timing of rubber tappers living in the Amazon2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Moreno, Claudia R. C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Vasconcelos, S.
    Marqueze, E. C.
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Middleton, B.
    Fischer, M.
    Louzada, F. M.
    Skene, D. J.
    Sleep patterns in Amazon rubber tappers with and without electric light at home2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 14074Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today's modern society is exposed to artificial electric lighting in addition to the natural light-dark cycle. Studies assessing the impact of electric light exposure on sleep and its relation to work hours are rare due to the ubiquitous presence of electricity. Here we report a unique study conducted in two phases in a homogenous group of rubber tappers living and working in a remote area of the Amazon forest, comparing those living without electric light (n = 243 in first phase; n = 25 in second phase) to those with electric light at home (n = 97 in first phase; n = 17 in second phase). Questionnaire data (Phase 1) revealed that rubber tappers with availability of electric light had significantly shorter sleep on work days (30 min/day less) than those without electric light. Analysis of the data from the Phase 2 sample showed a significant delay in the timing of melatonin onset in workers with electric light compared to those without electric light (p < 0.01). Electric lighting delayed sleep onset and reduced sleep duration during the work week and appears to interfere with alignment of the circadian timing system to the natural light/dark cycle.

  • 21. Møller, S. V.
    et al.
    Axelsson, J.
    Bjorvatn, B.
    Hansen, J.
    Hansen, Å. M.
    Harris, A.
    Hjarsbech, P. U.
    Härmä, M.
    Ingre, M.
    Jensen, M. A.
    Kecklund, Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Kolstad, H. A.
    Lie, J. A. S.
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Matre, D.
    Nabe-Nielsen, K.
    Pallesen, S.
    Puttonen, S.
    Rugulies, R.
    Tucker, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Vistisen, H. T.
    Garde, A. H.
    Co-ordination of research on working hours and health in the Nordic countries: Working hours and Health2015Report (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Nagai-Manelli, Roberta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    de Castro Moreno, Claudia Roberta
    Teixeira, LIliane Reis
    da Luz, Aparecida Andrea
    Mussi, Marina Hurga
    Conceicao, Adriano Balian
    Fischer, Frida Marina
    Sleep length, working hours and socio-demographic variables are associated with time attending evening classes among working college students2012In: Sleep and Biological Rhythms, ISSN 1446-9235, E-ISSN 1479-8425, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 53-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is the aim of the present study to assess factors associated with time spent in class among working college students. Eighty-two working students from 21 to 26 years old participated in this study. They were enrolled in an evening course of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. Participants answered a questionnaire on living and working conditions. During seven consecutive days, they wore an actigraph, filled out daily activity diaries (including time spent in classes) and the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale every three hours from waking until bedtime. Linear regression analyses were performed in order to assess the variables associated with time spent in classes. The results showed that gender, sleep length, excessive sleepiness, alcoholic beverage consumption (during workdays) and working hours were associated factors with time spent in class. Thus, those who spent less time in class were males, slept longer hours, reported excessive sleepiness on Saturdays, worked longer hours, and reported alcohol consumption. The combined effects of long work hours (>40 h/week) and reduced sleep length may affect lifestyles and academic performance. Future studies should aim to look at adverse health effects induced by reduced sleep duration, even among working studentswho spent more time attending evening classes.

  • 23. Stevens, Richard G.
    et al.
    Hansen, Johnni
    Costa, Giovanni
    Haus, Erhard
    Kauppinen, Timo
    Aronson, Kristan J.
    Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma
    Davis, Scott
    Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.
    Fritschi, Lin
    Kogevinas, Manolis
    Kogi, Kazutaka
    Lie, Jenny-Anne
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Peplonska, Beata
    Pesch, Beate
    Pukkala, Eero
    Schernhammer, Eva
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Vermeulen, Roel
    Zheng, Tongzhang
    Cogliano, Vincent
    Straif, Kurt
    Considerations of circadian impact for defining 'shift work' in cancer studies: IARC Working Group Report.2011In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 154-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the idea that electric light at night might account for a portion of the high and rising risk of breast cancer worldwide, it was predicted long ago that women working a non-day shift would be at higher risk compared with day-working women. This hypothesis has been extended more recently to prostate cancer. On the basis of limited human evidence and sufficient evidence in experimental animals, in 2007 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified 'shift work that involves circadian disruption' as a probable human carcinogen, group 2A. A limitation of the epidemiological studies carried out to date is in the definition of 'shift work.' IARC convened a workshop in April 2009 to consider how 'shift work' should be assessed and what domains of occupational history need to be quantified for more valid studies of shift work and cancer in the future. The working group identified several major domains of non-day shifts and shift schedules that should be captured in future studies: (1) shift system (start time of shift, number of hours per day, rotating or permanent, speed and direction of a rotating system, regular or irregular); (2) years on a particular non-day shift schedule (and cumulative exposure to the shift system over the subject's working life); and (3) shift intensity (time off between successive work days on the shift schedule). The group also recognised that for further domains to be identified, more research needs to be conducted on the impact of various shift schedules and routines on physiological and circadian rhythms of workers in real-world environments.

  • 24. Sundman, Joar
    et al.
    Friberg, Danielle
    Bring, Johan
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Nagai, Roberta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Browaldh, Nanna
    Sleep Quality After Modified Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty: Results From the SKUP3 Randomized Controlled Trial2018In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 41, no 1, article id UNSP zsx180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Objectives: To investigate whether uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) improves sleep quality in patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) using the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ) and the Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire (KSQ).

    Methods: Randomized controlled trial used to compare modified UPPP, with controls at baseline and after six months. The controls received delayed surgery and a six-month postoperative follow-up. All operated patients were offered a 24-month follow-up. At each follow-up, patients underwent polysomnography and vigilance testing and completed questionnaires. Nine scales were evaluated: five subscales and the total score in the FOSQ and three subscales in the KSQ.

    Results: Sixty-five patients, mean 42.3 years (SD 11.5), Friedman stage I and II, BMI <36 kg/m 2, moderate to severe OSA, were randomized to intervention (n = 32) or control (n = 33). In the FOSQ and in the KSQ, the mean rate of missing values was 6.2% (range 0-19%) and 20.5% (3-38%), respectively. In 8 of 9 scales, significant differences were observed between the groups in favor of UPPP. There were significant correlations between results from the questionnaires and objective measures from polysomnography and the vigilance test. At the six and 24-month postoperative follow-ups, 8 of 9 scales were significantly improved compared to baseline.

    Conclusions: In selected patients with OSA, subjective sleep quality was significantly improved six months after UPPP compared to controls, with stable improvements 24 months postoperatively. The correlations between subjective and objective outcomes, and the long-term stability suggest a beneficial effect from surgery, although a placebo effect cannot be excluded.

  • 25. Teixeira, Liliane
    et al.
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    da Luz, Andrea Aparecida
    Turte, Samantha Lemos
    Valente, Daniel
    Matsumura, Roberto Jun
    de Paula, Leticia Pickersgill
    Takara, Meire Yuri
    Nagai-Manelli, Roberta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Fischer, Frida Marina
    Sleep patterns and sleepiness of working college students2012In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 41, p. 5550-5552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The double journey (work and study) may result or aggravate health problems, including sleep disturbances, as observed in previous studies with high school students. The aim of this study is to analyze the sleep-wake cycle and perceived sleepiness of working college students during weekdays. Twenty-three healthy college male students, 21-24 years old, working during the day and attending classes in the evening, participated in this study. During five consecutive days, the students filled out daily activities logs and wore actigraphs. Mean sleeping time was lower than 6 hours per night. No significant differences were observed in the sleep-wake cycle during the weekdays. The observed lack of changes in the sleep-wake cycle of these college students might occur as participants were not on a free schedule, but exposed to social constraints, as was the regular attendance to evening college and day work activities. Sleepiness worsened over the evening school hours. Those results show the burden carried by College students who perform double activities - work and study.

  • 26. Teixeira, Liliane
    et al.
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    da Luz, Andréa Aparecida
    Turte, Samantha Lemos
    Moreno, Claudia Roberta
    Valente, Daniel
    Nagai-Manelli, Roberta
    Louzada, Fernando Mazzilli
    Fischer, Frida Marina
    Exposure to bright light during evening class hours increases alertness among working college students2013In: Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1389-9457, E-ISSN 1878-5506, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 91-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of exposure to bright light on sleepiness during evening hours among college students. METHODS: Twenty-seven healthy college students, all males, with ages ranging from 21 to 24years, working during the day and studying in the evening, participated in this study. During the 3week study, the students wore actigraphs and recorded levels of sleepiness. In a crossover design, on the second and third weeks, the students were exposed to bright light (BL) at either 19:00 or 21:00h. Salivary melatonin samples were collected before and after BL exposure. ANOVA test for repeated measurements were performed. RESULTS: After BL exposure, sleepiness levels were reduced at 20:30 and 22:00h (F=2.2; p<0.05). ANOVA showed statistical differences between time (F=4.84; p=0.04) and between day and time of BL exposure (F=4.24; p=0.05). The results showed effects of melatonin onset at 20:00 and 21:30h and sleepiness levels (F=7.67; p=0.02) and perception of sleepiness and intervention time (F=6.52; p=0.01). CONCLUSION: Controlled exposure to BL during evening hours increased alertness among college students. The effects of BL on sleepiness varied according to the time of melatonin onset.

  • 27. Teixeira, Liliane
    et al.
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Roberta Moreno, Claudia
    Turte, Samantha
    Nagai, Roberta
    Do Rosário Latorre, Maria
    Valente, Daniel
    Marina Fischer, Frida
    Work and excessive sleepiness among Brazilian evning high school students: Effects on Days Off2010In: International journal of occupational and environmental health, ISSN 1077-3525, E-ISSN 2049-3967, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 172-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have revealed that students who work and study build up sleep deficits during the workweek, which can trigger a sleep rebound during days off. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of working/non-working on sleepiness during days off among high school students. The study population, aged 14-21 years, attended evening classes in São Paulo, Brazil. For the study, the students completed questionnaires on living conditions, health, and work; wore actigraphs; and completed the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS). To predict sleepiness, a logistic regression analysis was performed. Excessive sleepiness was observed on the first day off among working students. Results suggest that working is a significant predictor for sleepiness and that two shifts of daily systematic activities, study and work, might lead to excessive daytime sleepiness on the first day off. Further, this observed excessive sleepiness may reflect the sleep debt accumulated during the workweek

  • 28. Vasconcelos, S.
    et al.
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Skene, D. J.
    Fischer, Frida M.
    Marqueze, E.
    Moreno, Claudia
    Satisfaction with work schedules is a contributing factor to reported sleep disturbances2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Wey, Daniela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. São Paulo University, Brazil; Faculdades Metropolitanas Unidas, Brazil.
    Garefelt, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Fischer, Frida M.
    Moreno, Claudia R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. São Paulo University, Brazil.
    Lowden, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Individual differences in the sleep/wake cycle of Arctic flexitime workers2016In: Chronobiology International, ISSN 0742-0528, E-ISSN 1525-6073, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1422-1432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Daytime workers tend to have shorter sleep duration and earlier sleep onset during work days than on days off. Large individual differences in sleep onset and sleep duration may be observed on work days, but work usually synchronizes sleep offset to a similar time. The present study describes individual differences in sleep behaviour of 48 daytime workers (25 men, aged 20-58 years) from an iron ore mine in Northern Sweden. The aim of the study was to determine whether differences in sleep patterns during work days were associated with the outcomes of sleepiness and sleep complaints. Cluster analysis was used to group workers into two categories of sleep onset and sleep duration. The "Late Sleep Onset" cluster comprised workers who slept 1.30 h later than the "Early Sleep Onset" cluster (p < 0.0001 for all weekdays). The "Long Sleep Duration" cluster slept 1.10 h longer than the "Short Sleep Duration" cluster (p < 0.0002 for work nights). The "Late Sleep Onset" cluster reported less refreshing sleep (p < 0.01) and had lower sufficient sleep scores (p < 0.01) than the "Early Sleep Onset" cluster. The "Short Sleep Duration" cluster also reported lower scores for sufficient sleep (p < 0.04) than the "Long Sleep Duration" cluster. For combined characteristics (phase and duration), workers with a late phase and short sleep duration reported greater sleep debt and sleepiness than workers with an early phase and short sleep duration (p < 0.02). Work schedule and commuting time modulate both sleep phase and sleep duration independently. Workers, classified as having an intermediate sleep phase preference, can organize their sleep time in order to minimize sleep debt and sleepiness symptoms. Individual differences in sleep phase and duration should be considered when promoting well-being at work even among groups with similar sleep needs. In order to minimize sleep debt and sleepiness symptoms, successful sleep behaviour could be promoted involving extend use of flexitime arrangement (i.e. later starting times) and reduce use of alarm clocks.

1 - 29 of 29
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf